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weathering techniques please

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  • Member since
    November 2005
weathering techniques please
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 31, 2003 2:48 PM
I need some weathering techniques for armor models
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by crossracer on Friday, January 31, 2003 8:47 PM
Gee, there are so many to chose from, here are just a few. After you paint your model seal it with a ackrilic clear coat (note you don't have to if you've used tamiya akrilics). After you let this dry a couple of days you can use a "wash" of sierra oil paint (or any color you think will look good). After that has dried you will need to tone it down with a flat clear coat again. THen you can dry brush to raise the detail. After this there are the pastel chalks, or dilute them in thinner and apply like a wash. When these dry they look very convincing. Try to have an idea of what you are looking for before you start waethering into the blue. Is your model going to be like new, medium wear, old hunk of junk. Tony Greenlands book is very helpfull as he goes for the "clean" look. There are so many combinations that it'[s hard to go wrong. If your worried by a inexpensive kit (acedemy, old tamiya) and practice on them before you start your masterpiece. Good luck and if you have any questions e-mail me Happy Bill
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, February 1, 2003 5:52 PM
I can only agree with what I read in the prior suggestion, but would like to add the following: Try not to make your tank look rusty. Rust on an operational tank is rare, with a couple of exceptions. The first one, of course, are the tracks. End connectors will rust overnight on an operational vehicle. The second biggie is the lower bow plate, it takes A LOT of abuse. The third exception, which almost everyone ignores, is bullet strikes. If you look at old pictures of WWII tanks, you will notice that many of them are covered with "freckles". These are bullet strikes on the armor. Small arms fire won't even dent the armor on a tank, but it will chip the paint off. After awhile, the bare metal will oxidize and form a dark reddish brown patina at that spot. If you want a "combat vet", don't forget the freckles. The best way to apply freckles is to take the darkest brown you have and mix in a little black to make it even darker. Then dip the tip of a round pointed toothpick into the mixture, tap it once on a different surface than the model to get rid of excess, then tap the tip of the toothpick over the surface of the model so that little dark spots appear. This should be the last thing you do to the vehicle, otherwise they might disappear under your drybrushing and pastels. Have fun detailing.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 2, 2003 11:59 AM
Hello,
For armor you probably want to use a dremal tool. You can achieve literally hundredes of different weathering effects with it. The way I get my best effect is to first drill holes in the fenders and sand away parts of them. then I use a small dremal head and just tap at my model to make it look like it has taken a real beating but not to much damage. Also break off small parts occasionally such has headlamps. use paint and pastels to rust it and look like it has gone through the field. finally use a little bit of mud on and around the tracks and anywhere else you feel would make a nice touch. I hope this is some help to you, if not then sry

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