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HEY how do you paint tanks? airbrush or by hand

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  • Member since
    November 2005
HEY how do you paint tanks? airbrush or by hand
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 1:55 PM
how do you guys paint tanks especially german armor im a young gun in the model world only 17 so i dont exactly have everything down yet but if its better to air brush ill pick one up thanks for your input
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 4:29 PM
For the larger part of the painting it is best done br airbrush. That way youy can get your shading and camo patterns. Your sammler pieces like the tools and other add-ons I do by brush. HTH
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 8:43 PM
me personally i do all my camo by hand and have found that it really comes out good if u are looking to do ur own camo patterns. i usally dry brush and then camo...for smaler parts i paint individually. but armor is gennerally od green and a mix of other colors. i f u use a base of od u can paint over it with sand or ather colors depending on ur taste
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 11, 2002 3:03 AM
I paint all my tanks, plain or cammo with an air brush. Air brushing makes for a much smoother finish than a brush and takes less time. I use a Model Master air brush. For the individual add on parts and equipment ( BII ) I usually paint them by hand. But this is just the way I do it. There are a lot of ways of painting. You just need to find a technique that you like, but I do recommend a air brush along with a good air source.
Good luck,
Pat
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 11, 2002 3:33 PM
I paint with an airbrush. The idea is to get a GOOD double action brush( I'm currently using a Badger 155 Anthem) then become familliar with the tool so that you think of it as your bristle brush. The finish will ALWAYS be smoother and more leveled with an airbrush. The end result will be what is called a "scale finish." I have found airbrushes and high quality compressors for almost 50% off the regular price with sale coupons from Michaels craft stores.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 12, 2002 7:05 PM
Like a number of the other posters, I use an airbrush for 90% of the model and then use a brush for the really small stuff, (I model 1/72) and for shading, dry brushing, weathering etc. I've found that the airbrush gives me a more uniform finish than painting by hand.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 1:48 PM
I always use airbrush .
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 9:04 PM
I use the big spray cans of the appropriate color for the base coats. I paint the treads by hand and then over coat with some brown or dirt color they drybrush some rust color lightly over the coats underneath. If you do the treads wet without waiting to dry you can get a spectacular effect. I model 1/15 scale and since the stuff gets a great deal of attention I focus on a few high detail points as well. I thurn my barrels on a lathe and use brass and scratch the machine guns or gear that is draped on the turret and main tank body. Using auto primer from a distance of two feet or more gives the effect of road dust or dirty snow and several coats of matte holds it all together. Nothing scientific but the effect is great. In my business office I have been routinely offered two to three grand for the items on display but they are for my grandchildren. Hope this helps.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 9:05 PM
I use the big spray cans of the appropriate color for the base coats. I paint the treads by hand and then over coat with some brown or dirt color they drybrush some rust color lightly over the coats underneath. If you do the treads wet without waiting to dry you can get a spectacular effect. I model 1/15 scale and since the stuff gets a great deal of attention I focus on a few high detail points as well. I thurn my barrels on a lathe and use brass and scratch the machine guns or gear that is draped on the turret and main tank body. Using auto primer from a distance of two feet or more gives the effect of road dust or dirty snow and several coats of matte holds it all together. Nothing scientific but the effect is great. In my business office I have been routinely offered two to three grand for the items on display but they are for my grandchildren. Hope this helps.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Wednesday, December 18, 2002 10:07 AM
There are situations where the airbrush is not usable, either because of cost or space or ventilation issues. I have found that if you handbrush with good quality paints and brushes you can get good results. It helps to use a gloss overcoat followed by a flat coat to get even reflectance from the different colors. Solvent based enamels seem to be easier to handbrush smoothly, but the Acryl and Polly Scale acrylics brush well, though they may need two coats to cover.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 31, 2002 9:42 AM
Air brush is the only way to go. To economically get started, a couple of suggestions:
1. Go to Wal-mart and pick up a Cambell-Hausfeld air compression. The model I have has a small air tank and cost around $90.00.
2. Find Dixie Art on the internet and get yourself a Badger 360 airbrush. They ship for free, you avoid sales tax, and their prices are about 1/2 usual retail (I recently picked up the new 20/200 detail brush for $40.00 delivered). I used a pasche and one of the new aztec brushes, the 360 puts them to shame with operation and ease of cleaning, especially if you use acrylic paint. I thought the aztec was the best until I tried the 360, after using it I gave my aztect away.
3. Get rubber surgical gloves and a good 3-M air mask, not just a dust mask. Paint and its fumes can be very harmful, even if it only is on your skin.
4. Paint booth. I know they are expensive, but it's hard to put a price on healthly lungs, as you only get one set.
5. Don't be afraid to screw up a model and practice, practice, practice. I keep my older models around as guinne pigs for camo scheme practice.
6. Have fun with it. I have the tendency to be so focused on the end result and perfection of the painting job that I forget to have fun painting. Relax and do your best. You'll get better and your work will improve.

For around $170.00 you'll get a good compressor and excellent airbrush. Also, I would recommend to you use acrylic paint. I washes up in water, as clean up is the big head ache for me, and is much less toxic than enamel paint.

I am far from an expert, probably alot closer to you in skill level than not. If you get the 360 and need any advise, send me a message.

rrennick2000@yahoo.com
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 5, 2003 10:08 AM
Patriot that sounds very interesting, how do you do these treads and well your superdetailing on tanks of 1/15 scale? I have been wanting to begin a 1/15 scale diorama of a sherman with crew but have been unable to find 1/15 figures or a 1/15 scale sherman, all are 1/16. My email is mb240@hotmail.com. I am very intersted in how you complete these large scale models.
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