I carve model aircraft is there an intrest here?

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I carve model aircraft is there an intrest here?

  • Hello all!

               I am wondering if there is an intrest in model carving? I mainly build civilian aircraft types airliners/helicopters/and home builts.I wish to post photos if I can Al of Spokane Wa

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  • Al, there are a couple of people here who also carve, but not very many. There is a new civilian aircraft section, and I bet that your pics would be very welcome!

    After all, it's FineScale forums, not FinePlasticScale! If you need help posting images I have a tutorial in the Community Assistance section, should be right up close to the top, look for the gold star.

    So long folks!

  • Actually, some modelers may not know this, but in the collector market, aircraft are well represented by carved wooden models.  A major toy soldier manufacturer, King & Country, has a series of WWII aircraft called Warbirds, whose models are made of mahogany.

    And as far as carving goes, there's a subject that I want to build in 1/48, and there's no plastic kit available.  I thought about vacuforming it, but I've never vacuformed anything, and I'd have to assemble the necessary tools to do it.  I've been thinking about carving the major components, instead.  I mean, vacuforming would probably mean making wooden masters, anyway, so why not just carve it, instead.

    So, sure, why not?  Please, let us see your work!

    Regards,

    Brad

    The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

     

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • i wanna see!!!!!! . particularly how you layout the model to start.

    thark you, stupid warhoons
  • Carving basswood has been my normal method of scratchbuilding.  However, the drawback for fuselage is the difficulty of hollowing out and providing detal in cockpit or cabin area.  I am starting to use a method similar to a brand of balsa wood scale race cars I used to build as a kid.  The fuselage is glued together from a number of blocks so there is a large hollow area in cockpit or cabin area. In some cases I am planning to use tubing structure in this area with no side block .  Nose and tail area will still be basswood.

    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • a picture is worth a thousand words.Smile

    thark you, stupid warhoons
  • The material doesn't matter, just build em and post pics so we can see them.


    " I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • I think seeing pics and may be some instruction would be nice.  I have taken a break from the plastic model building for awhile and am trying to get into scratchbuilding RC size aircraft and flying them.  Very little success at the building and flying but I am still trying and determined.  I would like to see some pics of finished and process pics.

  • I'll try to describe the process- don't have pictures handy.  If you have never done it, start with one that has solid interior, painted on windows/windshield.  Okay, start with a block of balsa, basswood, or whatever, length equal to length of fuselage, width and height just a little bigger than width and height of fuselage.  Trace profile onto side of block, planform onto top.  Use bandsaw to cut planform into block.  SAVE THE TWO PIECES THAT YOU SAW OFF.  Now, glue those scrap pieces back on with just a couple of dots of white glue.  Now saw the profile.

    You now have a block with planform and profile of fuselage, but not cross section.  Now, with the aid of the section templates, round off edges of block, checking frequently against templates.

    Present era of computer printers and home scanners has sure helped carving models.  Scan the sheet of drawings that has the section templates, print out on card (cover) stock and cut them out.  A little flimsey but much quicker than printing on paper, gluing to thick cardboard and cutting out.

    There are a couple of old books from TAB publishers that cover this kind of scratch modeling.  Also, if you can get ahold of any copy of a model airplane magazine from the fifties, almost every issue they published plans to make such "solid" models, with a writeup on how to do it.

     

    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Thanks Don.  I start my research on those books or older model airpplane magazines.  This looks fun to do.  I hope I have the necessary skill to pull this off.

    -Scott

  • I was thinking back to my Pinewood Derby days in Cub Scouts.  I was going to use a solid block and carve away the outline, and for the interior, drill out most of the material.  That's how I used to add back the weight on the derby cars (drill holes and glue in lead weights).  Once I had the area hollowed out, I was planning on using some fine chisels to remove the rest, and drop in a cockpit tub made of styrene.

    Maybe I'll move this project up and add it to my list of projects for 2010...

    The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

     

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • I wouldn't carve the outlines (profile and planform).  Too much work.  A bandsaw is the way to go.  I find a bandsaw essential if you do much scratch work.  In addition to cutting wood, I cut thicker plastic with it too (carefully so I don't burn it).  For smaller scale a jig saw will also do okay, but since buying a bandsaw I hardly ever use my jigsaw anymore.

    I first bought a well-used jig saw.  It had some problems.  Bought a new one about a year ago for under a hundred bucks. I feel it was a good investment.

    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Thanks for the tip!  A bandsaw would save time, true, but unfortunately, I don't have one in my shop, or a jigsaw.  But I do have a very good pocketknife, though, and a merit badge Smile  plus some good carving chisels.

    For my project, it won't be too much effort to carve away the main waste, down to a level where I'll switch to rasps and sandpaper.  It's a single-engined aircraft in 1/48.

    Regards,

    Brad

    The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

     

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • I second the bandsaw as a great scratchbuilding tool. I used to run out to the wood shop to use my big 105" Delta bandsaw but I finally broke down and bought a bench top model for my hobby room.


    " I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Woody

    I second the bandsaw as a great scratchbuilding tool. I used to run out to the wood shop to use my big 105" Delta bandsaw but I finally broke down and bought a bench top model for my hobby room.

    And they are cheaper than those top of line 1:32 scale jets that are coming out. I got my most recent one for ninety bucks about a year ago at Lowes (on sale- regularly just over a hundred).  You save enough when scratch building that you can buy tools Smile

    Don Stauffer in Minnesota