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I carve model aircraft is there an intrest here?

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
I carve model aircraft is there an intrest here?
Posted by artworks2 on Thursday, November 19, 2009 7:51 PM

Hello all!

           I am wondering if there is an intrest in model carving? I mainly build civilian aircraft types airliners/helicopters/and home builts.I wish to post photos if I can Al of Spokane Wa

  • Member since
    May, 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Thursday, November 19, 2009 11:48 PM

Al, there are a couple of people here who also carve, but not very many. There is a new civilian aircraft section, and I bet that your pics would be very welcome!

After all, it's FineScale forums, not FinePlasticScale! If you need help posting images I have a tutorial in the Community Assistance section, should be right up close to the top, look for the gold star.

So long folks!

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, November 20, 2009 11:29 AM

Actually, some modelers may not know this, but in the collector market, aircraft are well represented by carved wooden models.  A major toy soldier manufacturer, King & Country, has a series of WWII aircraft called Warbirds, whose models are made of mahogany.

And as far as carving goes, there's a subject that I want to build in 1/48, and there's no plastic kit available.  I thought about vacuforming it, but I've never vacuformed anything, and I'd have to assemble the necessary tools to do it.  I've been thinking about carving the major components, instead.  I mean, vacuforming would probably mean making wooden masters, anyway, so why not just carve it, instead.

So, sure, why not?  Please, let us see your work!

Regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: atlanta, ga, usa
Posted by qarloclobrigny on Thursday, December 10, 2009 1:52 PM

i wanna see!!!!!! . particularly how you layout the model to start.

thark you, stupid warhoons
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, December 11, 2009 9:10 AM

Carving basswood has been my normal method of scratchbuilding.  However, the drawback for fuselage is the difficulty of hollowing out and providing detal in cockpit or cabin area.  I am starting to use a method similar to a brand of balsa wood scale race cars I used to build as a kid.  The fuselage is glued together from a number of blocks so there is a large hollow area in cockpit or cabin area. In some cases I am planning to use tubing structure in this area with no side block .  Nose and tail area will still be basswood.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: atlanta, ga, usa
Posted by qarloclobrigny on Friday, December 11, 2009 12:25 PM

a picture is worth a thousand words.Smile

thark you, stupid warhoons
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Friday, December 11, 2009 12:48 PM

The material doesn't matter, just build em and post pics so we can see them.


" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by SNOOPY on Sunday, December 13, 2009 12:24 PM

I think seeing pics and may be some instruction would be nice.  I have taken a break from the plastic model building for awhile and am trying to get into scratchbuilding RC size aircraft and flying them.  Very little success at the building and flying but I am still trying and determined.  I would like to see some pics of finished and process pics.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, December 14, 2009 8:52 AM

I'll try to describe the process- don't have pictures handy.  If you have never done it, start with one that has solid interior, painted on windows/windshield.  Okay, start with a block of balsa, basswood, or whatever, length equal to length of fuselage, width and height just a little bigger than width and height of fuselage.  Trace profile onto side of block, planform onto top.  Use bandsaw to cut planform into block.  SAVE THE TWO PIECES THAT YOU SAW OFF.  Now, glue those scrap pieces back on with just a couple of dots of white glue.  Now saw the profile.

You now have a block with planform and profile of fuselage, but not cross section.  Now, with the aid of the section templates, round off edges of block, checking frequently against templates.

Present era of computer printers and home scanners has sure helped carving models.  Scan the sheet of drawings that has the section templates, print out on card (cover) stock and cut them out.  A little flimsey but much quicker than printing on paper, gluing to thick cardboard and cutting out.

There are a couple of old books from TAB publishers that cover this kind of scratch modeling.  Also, if you can get ahold of any copy of a model airplane magazine from the fifties, almost every issue they published plans to make such "solid" models, with a writeup on how to do it.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by SNOOPY on Monday, December 14, 2009 4:38 PM

Thanks Don.  I start my research on those books or older model airpplane magazines.  This looks fun to do.  I hope I have the necessary skill to pull this off.

-Scott

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 9:48 AM

I was thinking back to my Pinewood Derby days in Cub Scouts.  I was going to use a solid block and carve away the outline, and for the interior, drill out most of the material.  That's how I used to add back the weight on the derby cars (drill holes and glue in lead weights).  Once I had the area hollowed out, I was planning on using some fine chisels to remove the rest, and drop in a cockpit tub made of styrene.

Maybe I'll move this project up and add it to my list of projects for 2010...

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 9:55 AM

I wouldn't carve the outlines (profile and planform).  Too much work.  A bandsaw is the way to go.  I find a bandsaw essential if you do much scratch work.  In addition to cutting wood, I cut thicker plastic with it too (carefully so I don't burn it).  For smaller scale a jig saw will also do okay, but since buying a bandsaw I hardly ever use my jigsaw anymore.

I first bought a well-used jig saw.  It had some problems.  Bought a new one about a year ago for under a hundred bucks. I feel it was a good investment.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 11:00 AM

Thanks for the tip!  A bandsaw would save time, true, but unfortunately, I don't have one in my shop, or a jigsaw.  But I do have a very good pocketknife, though, and a merit badge Smile  plus some good carving chisels.

For my project, it won't be too much effort to carve away the main waste, down to a level where I'll switch to rasps and sandpaper.  It's a single-engined aircraft in 1/48.

Regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 12:27 PM

I second the bandsaw as a great scratchbuilding tool. I used to run out to the wood shop to use my big 105" Delta bandsaw but I finally broke down and bought a bench top model for my hobby room.


" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 9:47 AM

Woody

I second the bandsaw as a great scratchbuilding tool. I used to run out to the wood shop to use my big 105" Delta bandsaw but I finally broke down and bought a bench top model for my hobby room.

And they are cheaper than those top of line 1:32 scale jets that are coming out. I got my most recent one for ninety bucks about a year ago at Lowes (on sale- regularly just over a hundred).  You save enough when scratch building that you can buy tools Smile

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 9:47 AM

Woody

I second the bandsaw as a great scratchbuilding tool. I used to run out to the wood shop to use my big 105" Delta bandsaw but I finally broke down and bought a bench top model for my hobby room.

And they are cheaper than those top of line 1:32 scale jets that are coming out. I got my most recent one for ninety bucks about a year ago at Lowes (on sale- regularly just over a hundred).  You save enough when scratch building that you can buy tools Smile

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: South Africa
Posted by Skyguy101 on Thursday, December 31, 2009 2:50 AM

Hey,

I m busy building a Bell 206 out of balsa.  Would that be considered carving and would any one be interested to see my progress?

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: atlanta, ga, usa
Posted by qarloclobrigny on Friday, January 01, 2010 9:25 AM

i would love to pictures of any work like that. id like to star carving some simple shapes for vac forming and photos would be appreciated. dave

thark you, stupid warhoons
  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: South Africa
Posted by Skyguy101 on Friday, January 01, 2010 11:32 PM

Thanx Dave.  Please take a look at the scratchbuild forum under "scratchbuild Bell 206 B3 - My First".  Thats mine.  Carved out of balsa waffers stuck together.  Sanded smooth and then covered with resin.

Please let me know what you think.  Theo

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, January 05, 2010 11:55 AM

Skyguy101

Hey,

I m busy building a Bell 206 out of balsa.  Would that be considered carving and would any one be interested to see my progress?

 

Absolutely!  Please post some pics!

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: South Africa
Posted by Skyguy101 on Tuesday, January 05, 2010 11:00 PM

Here is some pictures.  The last ones are where I was this weekend in terms of progress

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, January 06, 2010 11:32 AM

Wow, that is outstanding!

Is the whole shell of the 'copter carved from balsa?  I mean, the nose, bottom, top, tail, and framing?  I'm impressed at your results.

Regards,

brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: South Africa
Posted by Skyguy101 on Wednesday, January 06, 2010 3:10 PM

Hey brad,

Yes EVERYTHING is balsa.  Even the skids!  I started by cutting a lengthwise frame off 2mm thick balsa of the side view of the machine.  Cut out the openings for the cabin and main transmission.  Then I cut waffers of balsa of the profile at that station as seen from the front and top.  Glued these to the lenghtwise frame at the appropriate spots.

Then I filled up the spaces between the waffers with rough pieces of balsa.  Then spent few hours (phew) carving and sanding until the shape came to live.  Then I filled up any small imperfections with spot filler (body puty).  Then covered that with two layers of resin.  Lots of sanding and a coat of actual aircraft primer.

I m busy making the doors next.  Will show you the weekend what that comes to.  I have already made the interionr paneling and carpets.  Hope it works.  I basically found some old shirts that has the correct grain pattern. Dye one set cream and the other one dark grey with water color paint.  Dryed it and iron it for bout an hour while spraying starch on it.  so now its stiff ;like plastic but with a scale matching grain to it.

I still have no idea of what color or pattern to spray the exterior as I work on helicopters I see alot of them and one thing most of them has incomen is that they are painted very very BORING.  I want it ot pop but at the same time be stunning but not American Chopper (If you get my meaning).

Damm thats a lot!  Sorry if I was rambling!  Its a real passion of mine and I am VERY proud of her!  Never thought my first would come out like this!!!!

anyway please feel free to give advise or critique!  Paint scheme?  I would love to communicate with you more.  If you want you can mail me at tvniekerk@hotmail.com.  Anyone can!

Regards

Theo

  • Member since
    September, 2015
  • From: The Redwood Empire
Posted by Aaronw on Wednesday, January 06, 2010 3:45 PM

Sure they would be welcome.

There is a member who goes by the user name Solid, that does some really nice wood models. I know he has been trying to work up interest and a forum for wood model building.

 

Here are a few of his posts

/forums/p/77046/758490.aspx#758490

/forums/p/79731/780850.aspx#780850

/forums/p/80500/787734.aspx#787734

 

He has done a lots more, these were just the first couple I found with a search.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, January 07, 2010 11:47 AM

Skyguy101

Hey brad,

Yes EVERYTHING is balsa.  Even the skids!  I started by cutting a lengthwise frame off 2mm thick balsa of the side view of the machine.  Cut out the openings for the cabin and main transmission.  Then I cut waffers of balsa of the profile at that station as seen from the front and top.  Glued these to the lenghtwise frame at the appropriate spots.

Then I filled up the spaces between the waffers with rough pieces of balsa.  Then spent few hours (phew) carving and sanding until the shape came to live.  Then I filled up any small imperfections with spot filler (body puty).  Then covered that with two layers of resin.  Lots of sanding and a coat of actual aircraft primer.

I m busy making the doors next.  Will show you the weekend what that comes to.  I have already made the interionr paneling and carpets.  Hope it works.  I basically found some old shirts that has the correct grain pattern. Dye one set cream and the other one dark grey with water color paint.  Dryed it and iron it for bout an hour while spraying starch on it.  so now its stiff ;like plastic but with a scale matching grain to it.

I still have no idea of what color or pattern to spray the exterior as I work on helicopters I see alot of them and one thing most of them has incomen is that they are painted very very BORING.  I want it ot pop but at the same time be stunning but not American Chopper (If you get my meaning).

Damm thats a lot!  Sorry if I was rambling!  Its a real passion of mine and I am VERY proud of her!  Never thought my first would come out like this!!!!

anyway please feel free to give advise or critique!  Paint scheme?  I would love to communicate with you more.  If you want you can mail me at tvniekerk@hotmail.com.  Anyone can!

Regards

Theo

Very impressive, Theo!   And you're helping me think about the project I want to carve.

As far as a paint scheme goes, how about a rescue vehicle?  I seem to recall seeing either Swiss or German choppers used in Alpine rescue and recovery that had some bright schemes, like yellow with markings.

Regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: South Africa
Posted by Skyguy101 on Thursday, January 07, 2010 12:25 PM

Why dont we start a forum?  I showed my uncompleted model to a couple of people today!  WOW what a response.  I even got offered an insane amount of money for it when its done as well got a few orders at a very good price!  Never thought my hobby could be so populor!

 

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Rothesay, NB Canada
Posted by VanceCrozier on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 11:34 AM

That chopper is a great piece of work. And probably "greener" than using plastic shiopped to us from who-knows-where! (Well, untill you break out the spray lacquer anyway!!!) I've got a couple of kits on the go right now, but at some point in the near future I am hoping to scratchbuild one of the WW2-era Horten flying wings using balsa or something similar, finishing with plastic parts from the spares box. As somebody mentioned earlier, I could try to vac-form something... but if I'm only going to build one, why not just use that "master" as the actual model.

I'll keep an eye out for anyone posting wooden builds, I may pick up a thing or two!

On the bench: Italeri 1/72 Henschel 126; Heller 1/72 Curtiss Hawk H.75; Airfix 1/72 Supermarine Swift. And probably a cat when I'm not looking...

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Rothesay, NB Canada
Posted by VanceCrozier on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 11:37 AM

...and the Baron may be on to something. Canadian SAR helos are brightly coloured too, mostly yellow with some red. Not sure if your type is in their inventory though:

On the bench: Italeri 1/72 Henschel 126; Heller 1/72 Curtiss Hawk H.75; Airfix 1/72 Supermarine Swift. And probably a cat when I'm not looking...

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Monday, September 19, 2011 12:45 PM

Wow I completely forgot that I made this postTongue Tied. I guess as I get into fall 2011 is as good a time as any to move forward. There are 27 replies and one fellow who made a Bell 206 that is a cut above my workCrying. That litte model must have taken 100's of hours to create??? Could somebody help me with posting my photos? Thanks for the intrest and I think this winter will be great for our hobbyWink

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Monday, September 19, 2011 5:13 PM

I suppose if I'm trying to impress afew modelers this one might do. There isn't much to scratch building other than a set of line drawings and refrence photos. I began building my own 15 years ago as I couldn't find good models of this subject and I have an extencive wood shop. For me this model is very easy to fabricate and could be completed in a couple of weekends. I use a scrollsaw to make the parts and motor tool to carve contours. Waterbased Acrylic will finish the model. I hope you enjoy and have questions. Alph AKA ArtworksIII

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