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Nuclear Weapons

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  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Nuclear Weapons
Posted by Hodakamax on Tuesday, July 12, 2016 8:18 PM

Here's a new one I'll bet, scratch building Americas largest nuclear weapon of the times, the Mark 17 Hydrogen bomb. After almost completing the Monogram 1/72 B-36H bomber I decided to replace the conventional bomb configuration with the weapon that it really carried, the Mark 17 Nuclear weapon. A little research revealed some scary facts. The Mark 17 Nuclear weapon weighed in at 21 tons and was 24' long and 5' in diameter and had a yield of 10-15 megatons. A bit of measuring matched the scale diameter to that of a marking pen. Cut to length the nose was fabricated with body filler and turned down to scale. Fins were fabricated from wood. Decals were added from various kits. The one I liked was "loaded". The compression rings were fabricated from wire and pre-painted. Everything is tied from the top. A little fabrication completed the model as it should be.

Max

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 9:53 AM

Wow, I was going to say that's da bomb! 

Maybe I should just say nice work! Embarrassed

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 10:12 AM

Not a big project but a fun one. The research was the interesting part and then figuring out the scale. It did nicely finish out the Peacemaker, (strange name for a carrier of mass destruction.) Indifferent

Thanks! 

Max

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:02 PM

In A PeaceMaker ?

      Seems kind of like an oxymoron doesn't it . Would that fit in a B.U.F.F. ?  T.B.

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Tucson, AZ
Posted by Archangel Shooter on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:09 PM

Yep! That looks better than the conventional bomb load Yes. I seen the one that was on display at Wright Pat and the size of that beast is awesome. There was a company that made various 1/72 nukes in resin, but they were always out of stock. I would like to see Hasegawa come out with a nuclear weapons set. 

 Your image is loading...

 On the bench: Trumpeter Ticongeroga

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:25 PM

The aircraft was built in Fort Worth.

Peacemaker, Texas style.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:37 PM

Nice scratch work! Toast

 

When I see those old big H-Bombs, I get visions of this....

 

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:45 PM

"Where in the hell is Major Kong?"

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:54 PM

Hey TB. In answer to your question about fitting in a BUFF (B-52) I just read a bit more about it. Evidently the B-36 was the only carrier of the Mark 17. They were discontinued before the B-52 was in service. By then Thermonuclear weapons had been reduced in size. They made 200 Mark 17s. Scary huh!

Max

PS--That was a funny movie with Slim Pickens riding the Nuke! LOL, Oh, and there was also a Peacemaker ballistic missle to blow up non-believers with multiple warheads.

  • Member since
    February, 2012
Posted by Liegghio on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 6:17 PM

I was in SAC during the Cold War. The biggest bomb loaded in B-52's was the newer B-53 which was about half the size and weight of this bomb, but almost the same yield at 9 megatons. It was a specialized bunker buster and not normally loaded. Typical nuclear load for alert was the B-61 in racks of four. Sub-megaton in yield, but they weighed no more than a typical iron bomb, so you could load a bunch if you wanted and sprinkle them liberally about. The B-61, also produced in a streamlined package for underwing carry by tactical fighters, was pretty much the work-horse of the nuclear arsenal.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 7:32 PM

Good report Liegghio, I find this stuff facinating (and all scary). I have a 1/72 B-47 model that I also added nukes but only with my speculation which was all wrong. I need to do some reasearch and get that one straightend out. The USAF air museum in Dayton has dozens of nukes that I found most interesting.

Thanks! 

Max

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, July 14, 2016 11:44 AM

Just for fun a photo of me with the  GBU-43/B MOAB - Massive Ordinance Air Blast Bomb or more colourfully the Mother of All Bombs at the USAF Ordinance Museum near Pensicola Florida...

As I understand this sucka so big it won't fit in any bomber- it and the pallot are slid off the back ramp of a C-130..... Indifferent

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, July 14, 2016 12:47 PM

Wow! Cool for sure! I'll bet the reciever gets a bang outta that. Hey, thanks for posting. 

Max

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, July 14, 2016 12:59 PM

OK, Max, I think I'm going to start calling you MacGyver! You built a nuclear weapon out of a highlight marker, a paper clip, and some paint! Big Smile

Great, great, job! Your ingenuity is outstanding!

Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, July 14, 2016 1:11 PM

Hey Bruce, tell me more about motorcycling, I see your picture shows one of my favorite sports also.

Max

PS--I've been trying to figure the yield (I always liked that term) of the 1/72 Mark 17. If it is 1/72 of 15 megatons it would be only 208.3 Kilotons. Am I figuring this right? That sounds to high, maybe it would be based on weight---- Help, lol

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, July 14, 2016 1:23 PM

Hodakamax

Hey Bruce, tell me more about motorcycling, I see your picture shows one of my favorite sports also.

 

Max,

Are you interested in motorcycle racing, or do you mean motorcycling in general? Personally, I rode streetbikes for 20 years, then got hooked on trackdays. That picture you see is me at Palm Beach International Raceway in West Palm Beach, Florida. About month after that picture I crashed at Homestead Raceway and broke my colarbone and wrist. After that, I hung up the leathers, and haven't been back on a bike since.

Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, July 14, 2016 1:44 PM

Just wondered, I'm 73 and getting too old for such things. I did ride a national vintage cross country almost two years ago which we called "The Last Great Race" and survived. I have built several 1/1 competition motorcycles as you would in modeling with lots of details. Same mindset I guess. I even have one hanging in the house along with my favorite models. I've been posting my 1/1 motorcycle projects on the Strictly Hodaka site/Forum. Anyway, Back to modeling!

Max

Here's a picture from younger days--What fun!

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, July 14, 2016 1:51 PM

I like the picture Max! And very nice Yamaha 2 stroke! What track are you running on?

Edit: Sorry for the small threadjack, but I love talking bikes!

Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, July 14, 2016 2:02 PM

Yes, motorcycles are cool also! That was at Topeka Kansas Raceway about 25 years ago. The modified RZ-350 was a hoot to ride! Being a modeler you might like the current 1/1 project on the above website. Talk about scratch build, almost everthing has been modified. It's called the Day One Project by Hodakamax of course. Its documented from day one as we do models on this site.

Max 

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: 29° 58' N 95° 21' W
Posted by seasick on Monday, August 01, 2016 2:29 PM

The Czar bomb is next? Is there a 1/72 Tu-95 kit out there?

Chasing the ultimate build.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Monday, August 01, 2016 5:03 PM

Wow, that would be a neat model with the biggest bomb ever dropped, the RDS-202 which was about 50MT as I remember. It scared the pilot so bad that he never flew again. Keep us posted if you find one!

Max

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, August 03, 2016 7:44 AM

Yeah !

 The scary thing is the miniaturising of those things . Oh well , nobody make any mistakes , Please ?   T.B.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Wednesday, August 03, 2016 9:26 AM

Let's see if we can find some pictures of "The Bomb."

Max

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Wednesday, August 03, 2016 12:03 PM

Wow, A bit of Googling and here it is with picture and dimensions. RDS-202 50MT Nuclear weapon. 26' long, 6.9' in dia., 27 metric tons. The Tu-95 (if we find one in 1/72) will have to have bomb bay doors and internal fuel tanks removed. 

That's my report!

Max

  • Member since
    June, 2003
  • From: Rowland Heights, California
Posted by Duke Maddog on Wednesday, August 03, 2016 1:29 PM

Hodakamax

Wow, A bit of Googling and here it is with picture and dimensions. RDS-202 50MT Nuclear weapon. 26' long, 6.9' in dia., 27 metric tons. The Tu-95 (if we find one in 1/72) will have to have bomb bay doors and internal fuel tanks removed. 

That's my report!

Max

 

 

 

So that's what that beastie looks like. Trumpeter makes a 1/72 scale kit of the Tu-95 bomber; it's an expensive beast though. I have the Tu-142 variant in 1/72 scale. I do need to try and build that someday.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Sunday, August 07, 2016 2:10 PM

Speaking of nuclear weapons, I did find the dimensions along with a pictures of the bombs needed for my B-47 posted under the Aircraft header. Looks like I may be back in the Nuke business soon! Yikes!

Max

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Monday, August 08, 2016 7:14 AM

This is the next scratch build project, a 1/72 B41 nuclear weapon for my B-47 to replace the bogus pair I dreamed up in the original build. I'm going with the single whopper for the 1/72 B-47. The dimensions were 12' 4" long x 4' 4" diameter. Weight 10,670 pounds and a yield of 25 Megatons, KER-BOOM! (of course at 1/72 it will have a much lower yield.) It came in silver, green and white which I'm going for.

Reporting,

Max

 

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Charleston, SC
Posted by kg4kpg on Friday, October 28, 2016 12:11 PM

I believe there is a kit in 1/72 of the Tsar Bomba. Amodel maybe, but not sure.

Speaking of yield, open this up and pretent to destroy the cities of your choice. You pick the location, yield, air or ground burst, and a host of other choices.

http://nuclearsecrecy.com/nukemap/

 

I was on 155mm SP artillery in Germany back in the late 80's. I spent a year on what we called SWAT (Special Weapons Attack Team), and our job was to meet an ammo unit who would come in by CH-47 and deliver us a 155mm M-45 casing containing a W-48 .072 kiloton warhead. If the East Germans were to attack (our AO was the Fulda Gap), then we would take over one of the guns from our parent battery and fire this baby into their ranks. A typical 155 round weighs about 98 pounds. This roundwas over 100 and in it's shielded carry case was 495 lbs. To train with it we had a matching dummy round and case. Our training room was on the 4th floor so we six-man carried that darn thing up and down twice a day. Never got to handle the live weapon though.

From the Wiki world:

The W48 was an American nuclear artillery shell, capable of being fired from any standard 155 mm (6.1 inch) howitzer, e.g. the M114, M198 or M109. It was manufactured starting in 1963, and all units were retired in 1992.

The W48 was 6.1 inches (155 mm) in diameter and 33.3 inches long. It came in two models, Mod 0 and Mod 1, which are reported to have weighed 118 and 128 pounds respectively. It had an explosive yield equivalent to 72 tons of TNT (0.072 kiloton), which is very small for a nuclear weapon.

W-48 nuke round

Pardon my rambling, just love nukes. Wink

Chris

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Saturday, October 29, 2016 8:10 AM

Cool stuff Chris! A fascinating subject for sure. In the 1950s a scientist that worked on the Manhatten Project came to our school and gave a lecture on the building of the Atomic bomb. I was in early high school and several of us "science nerds" were chosen to attend the classroom lecture. I was in awe. Everything I wanted to know about atomic bombs was being told to me over a one hour period.

At about the same period my uncle was a B-47 pilot in SAC. When he would come home, I'd drill him for all possible info on the subject and he would tell everything he could about  SAC, B-47s and nukes. I was hooked. I even studied Nuclear enginering as a career and began to assemble hours in enginering until I finally realized my mathmatical limitations were insufficient for such a career. Even though that road eventually ended , I was still hooked.

It seems I too am rambling, but I still find the subject fascinating. What a strange weapon, one that is incredibly powerful that in truth that can never be used without changing the history of mankind and not for the better. Scary is the word. Trillions of dollars have been spent on an unusable deterrent. Strange thinking for a civilization.

The USAF Muesum ay Dayton has an amazing array of Nuclear weapons on display that I once could only imagine what they looked like. After building my 1/72 B-36, the next thing on the list was to scratch build the monster weapon that it carried. I also have a 1/72 B-47 that needs to be correctly weaponized that is on my list of things to do. 

Thanks for your story Chris, I read every word twice. It is an interesting subject that makes you think, "what were they thinking?"

Max

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Friday, November 04, 2016 7:47 AM

Hodakamax

This is the next scratch build project, a 1/72 B41 nuclear weapon for my B-47 to replace the bogus pair I dreamed up in the original build. I'm going with the single whopper for the 1/72 B-47. The dimensions were 12' 4" long x 4' 4" diameter. Weight 10,670 pounds and a yield of 25 Megatons, KER-BOOM! (of course at 1/72 it will have a much lower yield.) It came in silver, green and white which I'm going for.

 

A bit of progress. I've measured everything in the shop and house to find a 1/72 B-41 nuclear bomb casing. With the help of my wife and her infinite supply of make-up, this lip stick tube is the perfect diameter. It's a start!  Smile

Max

  

 

 

 

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