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Question about scratchbuilding

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  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Question about scratchbuilding
Posted by Hunter on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 3:50 PM

Hello everyone,

I know typically this forum is dedicated towards plastic scratchbuilding. My question is it ok to display basswood scratchbuilding. I am getting ready to build a shop on my property and I was going to build a full scale version of it to have a "visual" aid and wanted to kinda do a WiP on it. Your thoughts and opinions are greatly appreciated.

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 4:14 PM

No mention of 'plastic' in the title---just 'scale.' We've had builds of wood, paper, metal and other stuff as well; there are just more plastic projects 'by volume.'

By all means show your stuff. We'd love to see it!

Greg

 

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 4:26 PM

gregbale,

Thank you sir....I'll be posting soon

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:09 PM

First of all Hunter, if it's OK with YOU it's OK.

There was a member, sadly not around, named Vespa Boy.

He did the most amazing models of streets. A section of sidewalk, a gutter, a drain, a little street paving and markings. Just great stuff. Lots of plaster, paper, netal, wood.

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/19/t/111460.aspx?page=1

 

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:18 PM

Bill,

Oh my gosh....that man has immense talent. That dio was absolutely amazing! The only reason I asked was I didn't want to post something that no one would want in this forum, or redirect it to the "Diorama" forum.

Thank you for sharing the link to Vespa Boy's creation...it was perfect. 

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:23 PM

Hello!

I'm with Greg - it doesn't matter hat you have built it out of as long as it looks cool!

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:27 PM

Hunter,

 

Here's his Fotki gallery

http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:41 PM

GMorrison

Hunter,

 

Here's his Fotki gallery

http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/

 

That is something else...I would love to have half his talent. I really liked the "Bigelow Street" dio, some much time and detail is put into his builds and it definitely shows.

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:42 PM

Thank you Pawel....it's great to hear from you friend!

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 8:56 AM

Here is a bit of history.  The IPMS used to require a certain percentage of a model entered into contests be plastic.  I frequently built models from wood and metal, so did not enter, nor did I join IPMS.  After years of complaint, and the growth of aftermarket resin and photo-etch, the IPMS dropped that rule.  Now folks can build out of anything they want, and still enter them into contests. If you didn't want to enter IPMS-sanctioned contests, no one could tell you what material you could build a model from.  I might point out that I have seen a contest where the gold metal for ships was won by a paper model!

I started out in the old days before plastic kits, when all kits were wood.  I find friends of my age who built wood models are more likely to scratch build a model than younger folks.  Wood is a wonderful material for scratch building or for modifying plastic kits.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:11 AM

Hi Hunter !

 I just have to pipe in here . I build models and dios out of just about anything . Paper , wood , Plastic and yes , aluminum cans too . Many I won't display , they were experiments in the material .

 You can do what you want . I find rules over materials to be Like a woman's bad fitting girdle ! Very Confining and serving no good purpose really . My wood Carving group went to a Juried Show . Even the sea grass around my fish had to be dyed wood . Whatta pain !

 Can you imagine skiving ( making wood shavings ) straightening them , shaping them and dyeing them to fit a rule when all the craft stores sell artificial grass ? Well , I did it in a pinch ( the night before the show ) Got Gold in  "Novice Sea Life Carving "  "Silver in Birds ( I did a flying style Hummingbird  ) , And last  ,but not least " Silver in Novice  Figures  ". I carved a self portrait Figurine in Navy Uniform , Right down to Ships badge and Medals !

    I have never done that again .The rules are to strict for me . I prefer a relaxed atmosphere where you have fun , B.S. with like minded modelers and just have fun there and over at the vendors tables . T.B.   P.S. I did another figure in Marine Dress Uniform but never finished him .

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:33 AM

Don & T-B,

Thank you gentlemen for the encouraging words. I will be starting this build here in the near future. I hope you drop in and look at it. Would love your imput or suggestions.

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, October 19, 2017 8:33 AM

I should say that there remain some die-hards in plastic modeling who do not like scratchbuilt models.  They feel the role of the model builder in plastic modeling is to take a kit and do the best job they can building it.  These guys often enter kits in out of box category contests if there is one.  That is fine.  What I do object to is when these guys serve as judges at contests, and mark down scratchbuilt, or heavily modified models, because it does not meet their idea of what plastic modeling is.

This is rare, however, so as long as you are not a rabid contest builder, don't worry about it.  In this day of multi-media kits, there is a new open-ness to materials. Indeed, there are those who feel a model is not really complete unless it has lots of PE and resin aftermarket.  So build what you like, scratchbuild to meet your own ideas and preferences.  Me- I still think wood is still the best model building material ever!

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, October 19, 2017 1:43 PM

Still remember my drafting classes in HS, had to make a drawing of said object, then use the drawing to build out of balsa.  Turn in both to instructor for grade.  Neat learning experience for my later forays into fabbing things for my vehicles and such.

Too bad most of those experiences are in long lost history for today's youth in school.

Will look for you build as you progress with it Hunter. Will take me back to days of old.

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Thursday, October 19, 2017 2:10 PM

goldhammer

Still remember my drafting classes in HS, had to make a drawing of said object, then use the drawing to build out of balsa.  Turn in both to instructor for grade.  Neat learning experience for my later forays into fabbing things for my vehicles and such.

Too bad most of those experiences are in long lost history for today's youth in school.

Will look for you build as you progress with it Hunter. Will take me back to days of old.

 

Hello GH,

I also took 3 years of drafting in high school and had to draw and contruct a 1400 square foot home for my final grade in the class. Sadly, high school drafting classes are done on a computer with a CAD program anymore. The days of hand drawing are long gone. Thank you, and I hope you look in on my build.

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, October 19, 2017 2:12 PM

Back when I built model railroads, it was always very helpful to model the thing at 1" = 1'-0". Working out kinks in cardboard and basswood sure beats doing it in plywood and 2 x 4s!

IMHO balsa has no real use in modeling unless the thing flies. By all means try it if you care to, but I get much better results with basswood. I have a little baby table saw which lets me make the sizes I need, but it's readily available in the back at most hardware stores.

Sands, glues, paints and cuts so much better than balsa.

I just made a mast for my Compass Rose Corvette out of a piece of basswood. My own preference for making round or tapered stuff is to start with square stock, other people start with round.

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Thursday, October 19, 2017 2:18 PM

GMorrison

Back when I built model railroads, it was always very helpful to model the thing at 1" = 1'-0". Working out kinks in cardboard and basswood sure beats doing it in plywood and 2 x 4s!

IMHO balsa has no real use in modeling unless the thing flies. By all means try it if you care to, but I get much better results with basswood. I have a little baby table saw which lets me make the sizes I need, but it's readily available in the back at most hardware stores.

Sands, glues, paints and cuts so much better than balsa.

I just made a mast for my Compass Rose Corvette out of a piece of basswood. My own preference for making round or tapered stuff is to start with square stock, other people start with round.

 

I could not agree with you more Bill. As in my opening comments I will be useing basswood. I have never been a fan of balsa wood. I to have a small proxxon miter and table saw that is great for basswood. I hope once I get started you will look in and give me your thoughts and suggestions. 

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, October 19, 2017 4:09 PM

Sure! I am an architect after all.

I've seen a lot of new fire fighting technology come online since 9/11. 

I work on highrise buildings.

We've had plug-in firefighter phones for a while, then air supply stations, photo-luminescent evacuation signs, firefighter elevators, and remote intercom stations. 

The latest are fireproof elevators for tenant evacuation. 

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Thursday, October 19, 2017 4:19 PM

Advancements in those areas never stop short of amazing. I am finishing up on my BS in fire science, techniques and management. I am up to speed on those areas you have outlined.

I forgot you are an architect, and advisor in "The City"...I look forward to your thoughts sir.

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, October 20, 2017 8:52 AM

GMorrison

Back when I built model railroads, it was always very helpful to model the thing at 1" = 1'-0". Working out kinks in cardboard and basswood sure beats doing it in plywood and 2 x 4s!

IMHO balsa has no real use in modeling unless the thing flies. By all means try it if you care to, but I get much better results with basswood. I have a little baby table saw which lets me make the sizes I need, but it's readily available in the back at most hardware stores.

Sands, glues, paints and cuts so much better than balsa.

I just made a mast for my Compass Rose Corvette out of a piece of basswood. My own preference for making round or tapered stuff is to start with square stock, other people start with round.

 

Amen!  I never make a non-flying model out of balsa.  To much work with primer, filler, sanding, etc.  When I was a Freshman in college I made a car for the old Fisher Body contest.  They strongly suggested not using balsa.  Since I had built mostly flying models up till that time, I ignored the advice.  I did get a decent finish on it- after over sixty coats of primer and model airplane dope! Two coats of primer and two of color usually suffice for me on basswood.

I think basswood is God's gift to woodcarvers and modelers.  If a model is, say 12 inches length or less, I will use basswood.  I have done a number of larger scale Great Lakes ship models, ranging from 30 to 40+ inches.  For those I did use a cheaper carving wood- poplar or aspen carve well.  Even then I did use basswood for deckhouses and such. 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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