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Bakers Waggonette - 1/12th scale

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  • Member since
    March 2014
Bakers Waggonette - 1/12th scale
Posted by Graham Green on Friday, September 13, 2019 3:51 AM

Just finished this one today, it’s a 1/12th scale Bakers Waggonette.
It had taken me just over 6 months of graft to get it finished, sometimes life just gets in the way of a decent hobby, eh.

The original full sized vehicle is on display at the Redlands Museum in Cleveland, Qld.
This vehicle was originally used around the Redlands District for bread deliveries, so now it’s where it belongs, in the local Museum. It was reconditioned and given a liquid overhaul many years ago by an expert carriage builder by the name of Alex Hamilton.
He was the last of the old time carriage builders from around Brisbane, Qld.
His family had been Carriage-makers at Kedron, Qld for about a century, that’s his grandfather and then his father joined the business, so Alex just had too follow along into the same business.

I had to do a series of drawings before I could start to make the model, I didn’t have a drawing similar, so plenty of photo’s and lot’s of measurements with a lot more time spent at the computer doing the drawings.

Mostly timber construction, with a few bits of sheet acrylic used for the wheel fellies and used Acrylic for the shafts as well. A lot of brass was used for most of the metal work, then a bit of steel turned down for the tyres and key-steel used for the axles.
All nuts and bolts are hand made using bronzing rods for the bolts and K & S square brass section  for the nuts.
Paint is just ordinary enamel house paint and the decals are all done in house using an ALPS MD 5500 printer, bloody magic bit of gear that ALPS printer, you can make a much better decal than what you could ever do with a Laser or Inkjet printer.
Each wheel has 67 decals added to it, so for the four wheels that’s 248 decals, don’t ask how many on the complete model as I have never bothered to count each and every one of them. It took me about a week, to put all the decals onto the model.
Plenty of photo’s showing what medium I used for the construction and then lot’s more showing the finished model.


 The last two are of the full sized vehicle at the Museum.

So have a look and any questions, then please ask.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, September 13, 2019 9:33 AM

Oh wow that's beautiful!!! 

Am I only one here that thinks it's almost a shame to paint them and cover up all that gorgous wood and metal work? 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March 2014
Posted by Graham Green on Sunday, September 15, 2019 6:40 AM

Gamera

Oh wow that's beautiful!!! 

Am I only one here that thinks it's almost a shame to paint them and cover up all that gorgous wood and metal work? 

 

 

Some persons like to make their wooden models and only give them a coat of clear varnish, but that to me seems a bit on the lazy side. Most horse drawn vehicles were painted originally, to protect the wood from the ravages of time, only problem was the paint that was used, wasn't very good at staying on.

What I have attempted to do, is re-create in miniature what is allready there.

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Brisbane Australia
Posted by Josh_the_painter on Sunday, September 15, 2019 7:00 AM

Fascinating Graham! The paint work is amazingly realistic. Have you done the scroll work as a decal/ transfer?

I wasn't even aware we had a museum out at Cleveland! However besides the occasional job in Capalaba I dont head in that general direction all too often. I will have to check it out.

If I may, the wagon is an interesting prototype to build. Is this the type of object you would usually model? Or a one off that sparked your interest?

Josh

  • Member since
    March 2014
Posted by Graham Green on Sunday, September 15, 2019 6:28 PM

Josh, check your "Messages" on this site, a message has been sent.

 

"Paint is just ordinary enamel house paint and the decals are all done in house using an ALPS MD 5500 printer, bloody magic bit of gear that ALPS printer, you can make a much better decal than what you could ever do with a Laser or Inkjet printer".

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, September 18, 2019 11:27 AM

Graham Green

 

 
Gamera

Oh wow that's beautiful!!! 

Am I only one here that thinks it's almost a shame to paint them and cover up all that gorgous wood and metal work? 

 

 

 

 

Some persons like to make their wooden models and only give them a coat of clear varnish, but that to me seems a bit on the lazy side. Most horse drawn vehicles were painted originally, to protect the wood from the ravages of time, only problem was the paint that was used, wasn't very good at staying on.

What I have attempted to do, is re-create in miniature what is allready there.

 

I know what you mean, I think most of us try to duplicate the look of the real thing. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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