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Completed Hindenburg with Pics

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  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Newfoundland, Canada
Completed Hindenburg with Pics
Posted by rodc on Tuesday, September 21, 2010 10:52 AM

I was going to post in the other wingy thingy category but thought it may be better off here.  Pics below are of an eBay gem I got a couple of weeks ago - the old AMT Hindenburg.  Although kit was opened, no parts missing and although decals looked a little yellow and frail, a dip in Future did the trick.

Silver color for body was Krylon spray and the black for the stand was also Krylon.  Tamiya Silver was used for stand accents and some Testors brown for the props.  This was a fun build - one of those no brainer builds and kit went together amazingly well.  There was only one spot on the dirigible body I had to smear a little putty.  Once decals were snuggled down, I gave it a coat of Testors Gloss.

I hope that the swastikas do not offend anyone!  They certainly were not affixed to the model to do that but their presence gives a sense of historical accuracy to the finished product.

Thanks for looking!

RODC

all parts washed and drying before assembly.......

closeup of the stand and thick, chunky props.....

full view of the entire model.....

On the Bench:

  • 1/32 Revell Bell 206 Jet Ranger (80% completed)
  • 1/1000 Polar Lights USS Reliant (80% Completed)
  • 1/144 Revell Airbus A300 Beluga Super Transporter (90% completed)
  • 1/48 Revell P-61 Black Widow (90% completed)
  • 1/35 Academy M50A1 Ontos (25% completed)
  • 1/48 Academy BF109G-14 (85% completed)
  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Wednesday, September 22, 2010 11:18 PM

Good job on an AMT Classic! I like airships too!    

  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by stcat on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:21 AM

Great job.  I doubt the markings offend anyone (Euro PC governments to the contrary).   I always thought it was silly that historical markings can be banned in some areas.  It's not like we're a target group for neo-nazi's.

Someone told me that the Hindenburg had to use hydrogen because we wouldn't sell them sufficient helium.  Anyone know if this is true?

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:32 AM

Where's the flames?

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:46 AM

stcat

Great job.  I doubt the markings offend anyone (Euro PC governments to the contrary).   I always thought it was silly that historical markings can be banned in some areas.  It's not like we're a target group for neo-nazi's.

A clarification--the laws against displaying Nazi symbols publicly aren't PC in the current sense, which might suggest that they've been passed at some recent time, but rather, they date back to the immediate post-war period and have their origins in restrictions which we imposed as the victors, and which were taken up by the governments that were established in Germany and Austria, and later in other European states.  That is to say, it's not like they were passed, to protect some kind of "right not to be offended", but rather, to prevent the renaissance of the Nazi movement.  Full disclosure--I fully believe in our Constitution, I don't believe in laws restricting political speech, and I'm glad I was born here and nowhere else.  I just wanted to offer that clarification on the origin of the European laws.  Sorry for offering a lecture!

stcat

Someone told me that the Hindenburg had to use hydrogen because we wouldn't sell them sufficient helium.  Anyone know if this is true?

That is correct.  The US was the premier producer of helium in the 30s, and as our relations with the Third Reich soured, sale of the gas to Germany was banned.  The Germans were forced to use the much more available but inflammible hydrogen.

Best regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:47 AM

Now, to the subject at hand--well done!  I built this as a kid, and it's one that I'd like to pick up today and rebuild.  It's not such a bad kit.  Yours has turned out very nicely.

Best regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 9:33 AM

Okay, as long as folks are showing other airships, here is my Lindberg Graf Zeppelin I finished this summer.  Photographed it hanging from a piece of wood outside my house, cut out just the Zeppelin part of the image, and pasted it against one of my stock sky images.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by shoot&scoot on Thursday, December 16, 2010 4:38 AM

stcat

Great job.  I doubt the markings offend anyone (Euro PC governments to the contrary).   I always thought it was silly that historical markings can be banned in some areas.  It's not like we're a target group for neo-nazi's.

Someone told me that the Hindenburg had to use hydrogen because we wouldn't sell them sufficient helium.  Anyone know if this is true?

Not only is it true but the Germans had planned on adding an 80 foot long length to the Hindenburg if the US had allowed the sale of the helium to go through.  They needed the extra volume because helium doesn't have quite as much lift as hydrogen.

This was demonstrated very well in the Los Angeles.  The Los Angeles was built for the US by the Zeppellin works in Friedrickshafen.  It was basically the Graf Zeppellin with an added bay for the necessary volume of helium.

I always wanted to do up a model of the famous Los Angeles "weathervane" incident but figured it would take two kits to get the correct length.  Tried to get the link to post but no luck.  If you google "Los Angeles weathervane incident" you'll get several links.  At one point the ship was perfectly verticle from the top of the mooring mast.

                                                                                          Pat.

                                                                                           

  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by stcat on Thursday, December 16, 2010 7:33 AM

Neat work on the coloring.  It shows off how they must of constructed it in sheets.  Your model really looks to scale.  Great job!

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Charleston, SC
Posted by kg4kpg on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 2:22 PM

Nice build.  Thanks for sharing.  Chris

I remember many years ago doing the Revell Hindenburg.  Not too long ago I made the mistake of buying an old Hawk Graf Zeppelin.  Guy ripped me off in my opinion as the kit wasn't in very good shape and my fault because I didn't research it enough.  I don't do anything vacuform, just don't like it.   

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: Springfield, MA
Posted by TigerEP1 on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 2:35 PM

Nice little kit there, and by little i mean it has so few parts it must of been a blast to put together!

I fear that a lot of people still see the Swastika as a bad omen when in fact its actually a symbol for good luck:

The word swastika is derived from the Sanskrit word svastika, meaning any lucky or auspicious object, and in particular a mark made on persons and things to denote good luck. It is composed of su- meaning "good, well" and asti "to be" svasti thus means "well-being." The suffix -ka either forms a diminutive or intensifies the verbal meaning, and svastika might thus be translated literally as "that which is associated with well-being," corresponding to "lucky charm" or "thing that is auspicious."

Excerpt from Wikipida:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika    (just copy and pastre the link if you would like to read more =)

Dave

 

On the bench:

 1/35th Tamiya Steyr 1500A /01 ,1/35th Tamiya 2 1/2ton 6x6 U.S. Cargo Truck , 1/35th  Dragon Sd.Kfz. 250/10 

Dave is my name, models are my game.

      

  • Member since
    August, 2006
  • From: Neenah, WI
Posted by HawkeyeHobbies on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 3:08 PM

Add some panel lines...the ship was covered by several large fabric panels, not one giant tube sock.

 

Here is a few of mine.

 

Gerald "Hawkeye" Voigt

http://hawkeyes-squawkbox.com/

 

 

"Its not the workbench that makes the model, it is the modeler at the workbench."

  • Member since
    February, 2017
Posted by Hansemann on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 2:48 AM

I am living in Germany close to Lake of constance and I work as a guide in the "Zeppelon Museum".

I just got the box Lindberg Graf Zeppelin. Before I start I collect now all informations about this airship, so for example the positions of the lights as I build in working electricity.

 

I have access to all informations as we have a large information center in the museum with thousand of books and plans.

 

See you later when I have finished my model,

 

Best from here

 

Hans

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: West Chester,Ohio
Posted by roger_wilco on Monday, February 20, 2017 9:32 AM
Great job on it RODC! I have the same kit (the reissued one from Round 2 Models.) I remember when this kit was originally issued by AMT in the late 1970's.

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