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737 bodies on rail cars.

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  • Member since
    February, 2011
737 bodies on rail cars.
Posted by knox on Friday, May 18, 2018 10:15 PM

I saw three of these on the way home from work yesterday. I don’t know why I still get excited about seeing stuff like this , but I do.  

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:58 PM

Hello!

That sure is an interesting cargo! You don't get to see anything like that in Europe (Or at least I didn't see anything like it!). Thanks for sharing and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    June, 2010
  • From: Australia
Posted by OctaneOrange on Sunday, May 27, 2018 4:19 AM

Pawel
You don't get to see anything like that in Europe

airbus send their planes by road across the many countries

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGVe0xOMywE

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 27, 2018 8:30 AM

And others build giant cargo planes to carry major assemblies!

 

And I wonder, worldwide, how many aircraft fuselages have ended up as diners.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Sunday, May 27, 2018 1:23 PM

Hello!

That's what I meant - by road, yes, by plane - yes, but not by rail. I believe in Europe the loading gauge wouldn't allow that.

Don - it would be interesting to see such a statistics.

Have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Monday, May 28, 2018 2:59 PM

It's my understanding that European rail guages are all pretty similar; just different by a significant couple of centimeters.

Now, what I know about European rail would fit in one hand with room to spare for a biscuit or two.

But, as a guess, I'd wager it's the height clearances.  Even in the US, there are distinctions between height clearances for east of the Mississippi and west thereof (greater clearance to west).

There can be issue with track radii, too--which becomes an issue for over-length items.

But, as a further guess, I'll wager it's easier to clear roads in the middle of the night than rail traffic.

 

All of which is a flat-out guess, and worth about 2¢ (€0.0172)

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, May 28, 2018 3:53 PM

Hello Capn!

You like going into detail, don't you? It'd be my pleasure to provide you some!

Here's the loading gauge for the european railroad (G1 is international, G2 is Germany):

European railroad loading gauge

We're talking so called normal track gauge which is for most of Europe 1435mm - the Russians have wider gauge to prevent the invaders from using their network.

As you see the widest space on a rail car would be 3150mm. At the same time I read that the widest space in the cabin of a 737 is 3530mm. That would mean the fuselage is a tad wider, ergo it wouldn't fit by at least 400mm. If they absolutely can't fly it, they will put it on a barge, or take it on the Autobahn.

Thanks for reading and have a nice day!

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:42 AM

If they can't fly it on existing large transport aircraft, they need to build a bigger one yet.  Call it the Ultra-Guppy.

Wonder how the Dreamlifter is working out.  Is it still flying aircraft parts around?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Charleston, SC
Posted by kg4kpg on Thursday, May 31, 2018 7:27 AM

Dreamlifters are in and out of Charleston daily. Since they started production on the 787-10 Boeing has really gotten busy. Lots of colorful tails on their finishing line outside.

 

Don Stauffer

If they can't fly it on existing large transport aircraft, they need to build a bigger one yet.  Call it the Ultra-Guppy.

Wonder how the Dreamlifter is working out.  Is it still flying aircraft parts around?

 

  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: Washington State
Posted by leemitcheltree on Thursday, May 31, 2018 5:47 PM

Those beasties are made by Spirit Aerosystems in Witchita, Kansas, and are railed to Renton in WA, where they're turned into 737's and the P-8 Poseidon.

Imagine....a light gray 737 with hardpoints for Harpoons and a bomb bay!!!!!

Awesome.

Cheers, LeeTree Remember, Safety Fast!!!
  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Thursday, May 31, 2018 10:30 PM

And then, there was the time a few years ago when a train derailment resulted in three 7437 fuselages in the river in Montana.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/todayinthesky/2014/07/05/train-derailment-spills-boeing-737-fueslages-into-river/12258639/

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, June 01, 2018 5:02 AM

Hello!

Well, that photo should also land in the "Dioramas I'd like to build" thread:

Have a nice day!

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    June, 2017
Posted by jmoran426 on Friday, June 01, 2018 9:49 AM

If you are thinking of modeling the Boeing 737 on railroad flat car, it is already being done in HO (1/87) scale.  Follow link:

https://www.shapeways.com/product/FLJKL39CS/1-87-boeing-fuselage-icebreaker-cradles-for-flat

jmoran426

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Friday, June 01, 2018 10:11 PM

I work for a company that makes very big, commercial aircraft engines.  Our largest engines require two trucks.  The fan assembly goes on one, and the propulsor assembly goes on another.  There have been mishaps which have put engines in muddy corn fields. 

This is in Australia, but it happens in the US on occasion. 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-06/aircraft-engine-falls-off-truck-in-sydney-oversize-load/7819876

 

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, June 02, 2018 5:26 PM

leemitcheltree
and a bomb bay

I imagine said bay is forward of the wing spar, since the center fuel tank and landing gear occupy most of that space. 

Trivia:  737 main landing gear tires are exposed when retracted.  There's a flexible seal that inflates around the tire's circumference to close up the bay.

Given the vast dimension of the 737-800 rear cargo area, it would seem like an internal bay for Harpoon and/or torpedoes would be simpler than wing hard points.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
Posted by jmcquate on Sunday, June 03, 2018 12:27 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkyIwyyAywo&t=125s

  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: Washington State
Posted by leemitcheltree on Tuesday, June 05, 2018 4:14 PM

My wife watches these beasties being craned off the flatcars every morning from her office windows in Renton.
And imagine.....more than 45 of these things roll off the assembly line....EVERY MONTH.

Amazing.

Cheers, LeeTree Remember, Safety Fast!!!

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