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Spin Models XLG-225 Medak sailplane

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  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: western North Carolina
Spin Models XLG-225 Medak sailplane
Posted by kensar on Saturday, July 28, 2018 8:26 AM

A simple, low parts count model that takes a lot of work to make presentable:

Spin Models 1/48 XLG-225 Medak

This was one of the first sailplanes to use a laminar airfoil. There was only one prototype made to develop laminar airfoils for sailplanes in the early fifties.   Information is very scarce for this one.

This Spin Models resin kit has very low number of parts and minimal detail.  Lots of putty was used on the fuse as it was badly warped and attempts to straighten it out were less than completely successful.  Tamiya Chrome yellow paint.

 

 





This is the second of a few 1/48 scale sailplanes I will build eventually.

 

Tags: Medak , Spin models

Kensar

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Saturday, July 28, 2018 11:20 PM

Well done, Kensar.  The yellow looks great.

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, July 29, 2018 1:43 AM

I was thinking the same - really nicely laid down brilliant yellow.  Interesting subject.  I have a friend the flys real sail planes and scale R/C. 

BTW I know next to nothing about aircraft design, but I'm curious why such a substantial rudder on that plane?

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: western North Carolina
Posted by kensar on Sunday, July 29, 2018 5:34 AM

I've wondered that also about many classic glider designs.  Based on my knowledge of RC sailplane design and comparing to new designs, I would say that the fuse length is short compared to modern designs, and so they need a lot of rudder authority to circle and manuever at slow speed in thermals.  New designs have longer fuses and so need less torque from the tail (rudder and elevator) for manuvering.

Kensar

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, July 29, 2018 8:01 AM

Ah ! 

 Thank You , Kensar ! I get so tired of folks calling them gliders . Yes , the monstrous things used in WW-2 were indeed Gliders . What these are indeed are  Sail - Planes .

 Going up in one and flying with the birds .( you have to use the same tactics to remain aloft as they do ) is akin to Diving the Great Barrier reef twenty Years ago . Sheer exhileration and freedom ! 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, July 29, 2018 11:09 AM

High aspect ratio wings and slow speed can create problems!  Gliders in general require large rudders, the lower the speed the more problem and the more rudder authority you need.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: western North Carolina
Posted by kensar on Monday, July 30, 2018 6:39 AM

Thanks to all of you who commented.  This was a model that was worked on in-between other builds or when paint or glue was drying on other builds.

This is indeed a sailplane as the glide ratio is high enough.

Kensar

 

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