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Minicraft (Airfix) 1/144 Boeing 314

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  • Member since
    September, 2012
Minicraft (Airfix) 1/144 Boeing 314
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, August 11, 2018 11:20 PM

 

This kit is next in my builds, partial build from the mid war era. Going through the SoD and boxes of started but not finished.

 Rather than do another Pan Am Clipper, I have a "what if" in mind.

It's a decent kit, a lot of sink marks and ejector plugs in bad places.

She's about to go into prime and putty, more soon.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, August 12, 2018 12:03 AM

That is one pristine work surface!  Looking forward to where you going to take this. 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, August 12, 2018 12:07 AM

I have a plan for a what if aircraft. A real airline that bought this aircraft for competition on the SFO-HNL route against Pan Am and United.

  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: western North Carolina
Posted by kensar on Sunday, August 12, 2018 8:55 AM

Cool idea.  I'll be following along.

Kensar

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, August 12, 2018 11:37 AM

I and several of my friends call this the Classic Era.  Do a lot of it.  I have a partially finished Boeing, and a Martin still in the box (also a Sikorski S40 on my shelf of doom- needs a lot of seam filling but I need to get back to it one of these days).

For that era, we still need a decent Ford Trimotor!

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, August 12, 2018 12:38 PM

Don Stauffer

I and several of my friends call this the Classic Era.  Do a lot of it.  I have a partially finished Boeing, and a Martin still in the box (also a Sikorski S40 on my shelf of doom- needs a lot of seam filling but I need to get back to it one of these days).

For that era, we still need a decent Ford Trimotor!

 

 

Did you ever build the old Frog Fokker F7 Southern Cross ?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, August 13, 2018 8:28 AM

GMorrison

 

 
Don Stauffer

I and several of my friends call this the Classic Era.  Do a lot of it.  I have a partially finished Boeing, and a Martin still in the box (also a Sikorski S40 on my shelf of doom- needs a lot of seam filling but I need to get back to it one of these days).

For that era, we still need a decent Ford Trimotor!

 

 

 

 

Did you ever build the old Frog Fokker F7 Southern Cross ?

 

 

Nope.  Have two Fokkers in my stash, but not SC.  Been wanting to scratch a Fokker, however, the Army plane that set the endurance record- forget the name.  One hanging in museum.  Lots of photos available.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Monday, August 13, 2018 9:38 AM

Fokker T-2 flown by Kelley and McCready,  Fokker called it the F.IV, Don.

Do us proud, Bill!

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 10:06 AM

Things are going together well. Generally the fit is nice, just a few hairline gaps and some sink marks.

This shows my method for sealing small gaps. Left to right- tape close on both sides of gap and apply putty with a blade, using the thickness of the tape as a "screed".

Sand putty down to top of tape, if needed.

Remove tape.

Finish sanding/ smoothing.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, September 05, 2018 11:11 PM
A little actual history and a little revisionist history.
 
Following World War 2, a number of surface carriers in the United States invested in aircraft and formed airlines for faster service overseas. Companies like Matson, Moore-McCormick and Grace Lines already had overseas offices, agents and a knowledge of foreign business regulations. They were well placed to take advantage of the new airfields and air traffic control systems built all over the world during the war.
Others, like Santa Fe railroad, (ATSF), had established domestic routes, sources of supplies of perishable products, and looked to augment their rail service with high speed refrigerated perishable air freight service. But that’s another story and another build.
 
Matson Lines was a well established passenger and freight operation headquartered in San Francisco, and making good money with the luxury ship service to Hawaii. In 1946 the line started to operate two DC-4s on non-scheduled routes to Hawaii, and up and down the West Coast. The aircraft, Sky Matsonia and Sky Royal Hawaiian, were all-first-class and presented fierce competition for Pan Am and United on the Hawaii routes. The attraction was to travel one way on the surface in one of the Matson cruise liners such as the SS Matsonia, Lurline, Monterey or Mariposa. Return by air. And stay at one of the luxury Matson hotels on Waikiki Beach; the Moana or the Royal Hawaiian.
Pan Am could never make any money with their Clippers on account of operating costs and difficulties, and United was struggling with unreliable aircraft types.
Matson set up their airline by hiring American Airlines’ No. 1 Captain, E.L. Sloniger. He in turn brought his favorite AA pilots, including Ernest Gann. Gann later wrote well about this and other experiences, some of which I’ve included here.
Inevitably, Pan Am, United and TWA exerted their influence in Washington and with the CAB, and surface carriers were ruled ineligible for airline certification. Matson Airlines struggled through 1947 and stopped operations in 1948. Santa Fe went through a similar series of problems, a story to be related in another post.
Here my story takes a turn. Pan Am had purchased six Boeing B-314s and started Pacific service in 1939. Initial success led to purchase of an additional six 314As, however when they started service in 1941 the hostilities already threatened the Pacific routes. PAA sold three to BOAC, who operated them through the war and on until 1948 on Atlantic routes.
When the US entered the war, the Clippers were purchased by the Navy for use as transports, and leased back to PAA who operated them. Several were lost during the war, and by 1945 they were obsolete as the DC-4 and the Constellation became available. Pan Am sold the ones they got back from the Navy to World Airways or scrapped them for parts.
 
“What if” Matson had bought one in 1946 with the aim of extending their airline routes from Hawaii to Micronesia, Hong Kong and the Indian Ocean? Again, they could have doubled up on their existing surface operations, making use of their Pacific Asian business operations, Not all business decisions are successful of course, but down on Market Street it sounded like a good opportunity to stick a twig in Juan Tripp’s eye.
Matson received the former Clipper Bombay, NC18616 at Alameda, CA on April 1, 1946. After conversion back to it’s luxury level of comfort, she became the aircraft of choice of now full-Captain Ernest Gann, and was based in Honolulu.
Gann moved his family from their townhouse on Washington Street in San Francisco’s toney Pacific Heights, to a 5 bedroom mansion in Kahala.
She was renamed Sky Lurline and flew Honolulu- Hong Kong- Guam- Jakarta for several years. Following the dissolution of Matson Airlines, Syd de Kantzow and his gang of pirates at Cathay Pacific bought her. She never flew any more passengers, instead becoming a floating casino in Macao Harbor.
 
Back to factual history: Gann retired from flying and got to work writing The High and The Mighty. But that’s beyond the scope of this story, which is already too long.
I’ve had this model for quite a while and recently became interested in finishing it. In the box, the fuselage halves were glued together, the decals are in good condition, and all of the other parts seemed to be there.
However, the world doesn’t need another Pan Am Clipper model, or at least one from me, so I decided to do something a little different.
There’s a great source of custom decals I’ve found. Vintage Flyer Decals, his site is easy to find. They sell a Matson Airlines set for the DC-4, which I looked at while looking for another DC-4 scheme. Rather than fill a shelf with DC-4s which would not be a bad thing, I thought of the story of the Sky Lurline.
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, September 06, 2018 2:27 PM

Bill, I think I have an extra set of the Matson decals that I was going to use on a Mach 2 DC-4, but now I have the Revell kit and Mike made a specific set of Matson decals which I bought.  So if you want the Mach 2 set let me know and I'll send them to you.

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, September 10, 2018 3:15 PM

Thanks, John. I'm set.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, September 10, 2018 3:19 PM

Decals are a mix of the kit ones for the NC numbers, and the Vintage Flyer 1/144 Matson Airlines set for the DC-4. Well, that was fun! 

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Monday, September 10, 2018 3:21 PM

Very nice, Bill.  Ernie looks happy there in the left front.

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Winter Park, FL
Posted by fotofrank on Monday, September 10, 2018 8:53 PM

Really cool. A not-a-Pan Am clipper!

OK. On the bench:

Way too much to build in one lifetime...

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, September 10, 2018 11:44 PM

Thanks Frank. Matson, United and Hawaii were all a part of my childhood travel in the 1950's.

I also spent my career down at the end of Market Street working on headquarters buildings for the transpacific trade.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, September 10, 2018 11:50 PM

Hey John, thanks. Do you have any info on whatever SP got themselves into in the airline business?

As a lifetime member of the SP Historic Society, I got nuttin'.

My Revell C-54. Isn't that a nice kit?

It will be the ATSF Sky Chief Taos. I think it's NC90863 but I'm not sure. 

She ended up down in the lower latitudes, even was hijacked by Argentine radicals to the Falkland Islands.

 I liked the idea of Sky Lurline

I first went over there in 1959 at the old age of three, but I remember it well.

We flew all-coach in a DC-7 as dad had maybe 6 years seniority.

My godparents, who the wife was my mothers best friend in college; the husband was in submarines at PH.

It really was the time of bonfires on the beach, Duke riding his surfboard onto Waikiki beach for hotel luaus.

We later flew down to the Big Island on a DC-3 with paratroop seats.

The only other passengers were a chain gang of islanders returning from road building on Oahu, and the guards.

Dad, being dad, made friends with them.

A couple of days later we went down to the pen, near Kilaueu, where he bought out the prison industry store of Kalua wood salad bowls.

Got them sent back on a UAL freight flight.

Allk to say I've loved the islands my entire life, and it was fun to imagine a Clipper service out of there.

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 12:28 AM

All I can share about SP and the airlines is ignorance, Bill.  Other than knowing they attempted it.

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: western North Carolina
Posted by kensar on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 6:36 AM

I had never heard of Matson Lines before your build, but I am not that up on airlines and freight lines.  Nice livery, though.

Fictional liveries (and aircraft) make the hobby more interesting.

Good looking build.

Kensar

 

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