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Bret Build: MaK 44 Type MK44 Ammoknights - Now With Rivets!

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  • Member since
    June, 2016
  • From: Portland, OR
Bret Build: MaK 44 Type MK44 Ammoknights - Now With Rivets!
Posted by Boxcar_Bret on Sunday, June 19, 2016 12:22 AM

I'm new to the world of MaK and I'm totally fascinated with the armor/vehicles. As some of you know I've just recently gotten back into this obsession we call a hobby and I'm still honing my chops and my intention was to ease into by building something familiar. The plan was The Easy Eight Sherman from "Fury" since a lot of the painting and weathering techniques would crossover. I was also hoping to have purchased an airbrush by then. Well all that went out the window!

Happy Father's Day to me! After work today I went to the local independent hobby store that was having a 15% off sale. Much to my surprise they had a lone Hasegawa MaK MK44 Ammoknights Smarten Equipment Type kit. 

I got home, opened the box, looked at the sprues, looked at the instructions and put the lid back on the box. I might have to stick the previous plan. Of course I could begin sub-assemblies, filling gaps. Regardless, I anticipate this being a slow build and any suggestions are welcome.

  • Member since
    October, 2009
  • From: South La
Posted by Ti4019 on Sunday, June 19, 2016 12:53 PM

i just got mine last week.  I dont know your background but Im going to go off the presumption that you dont have a big background in Mech or walking mech.   Think of it as a light armored fighting vehicle with legs. 

Ive built the Wave and Nitto kit, and they have their typical issues of puttying seams like every other kit. 

the Mk 44 is a Hase kit, and I expect Hase level of engineering on it. With the many Gundam kits i have built from Bandai (Master Grade kits) there is VERY little putty used---this is my expectation on this kit. 

 

My advice....enjoy the kit.  This is a split suit kit , which means that it opens up for driver entry.  Determine if you want to go this route, or more of the "buttoned up" look. Mine will be split with two drivers talking to each other.  

Follow the insructions--they are clearly laid out, and systematic.  I always tart with the feet and work my way up. Use an egg carton with labels so you  know which is the left leg, left foot, left arm, etc. 

I always use liquid glue, and Tenax 7r is my new favorite applied with a small brush. I also use Tamiya thin liquid and Testors liquid. Given the engineering of this kit I expect it to fall together.  

A word about the locator pins--on Gundam kits they are supposed to be a tight press fit, and othr than the hips which I always glue for extra strength.  I always cut my locator pins at an angle, and cut them short so I can get it apart for panting individual parts . I glue anyway even tho they are supposed to be press fit. I just run glue along the seam, and it seeps in.  

 

When it comes to weathering, paint and weather it like armor. Im not too hot on the kit paint schemes.  MOST Ma.K. uses WWII style paint, especially Luft style paint for the Strahl ground forces.  The mercenary forces use this WWII paint style too, but tend to dress their machines up more (like the SAFS Snowman) I will play with some colors and find out what I like, and use the provided sheet as a mix and match for the way I want my Mk44 to look. 

There are a couple of great sites out there and I have links in my own uild topic here in this forum. They are helpful and inspirational. 

 

have fun with it, and dont let it sit in the box.  Build it--you will learn and have some fun at the same time. 

If you aren't having fun, you're doing it wrong! Build to please yourself and they will flame you every time!

  • Member since
    June, 2016
  • From: Portland, OR
Posted by Boxcar_Bret on Sunday, June 19, 2016 3:43 PM

Thanks, Ti4019 for the pointers! 

Using an egg carton to separate parts out is one of those simple obvious tips I love. Cutting the locator pins at an angle is something I've never heard of and it makes perfect sense! 

I'm using the Tamiya Extra Thin. I'm excited because I've never used it before. When I was younger I used the Testors liquid cement all the time. When I sw the extra thin demonstrated my head almost exploded.

I figured out why this kit seems so intimitating to me; I don't have any point of reference. All the kits I've built in the past have either been armor, aviation or based off a movie. There's no real world reference (pictures, articles, footage) to subconsciously draw from and put it in context. 

In a lot of ways it can be daunting but in others its exciting and challenging. I'm starting today and I can't wait to see how it turns out. 

I'll do a search for your builds.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, June 20, 2016 7:30 AM

Looks very cool, please keep us updated. I'd love to see how this goes together. 

I know what you mean about point of reference. I've been staring at a dinosaur kit here for a month. You'd think being able to paint it anyway I want would be liberating but I keep thinking up ways to paint him and then discarding them- need to make up my mind on something! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    October, 2009
  • From: South La
Posted by Ti4019 on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 11:16 PM

Gamera I'll go OT just for a sec here, then I'll get back on topic. Ray Rommel produced a great book on building Dino's and IIRC  Kalmbaach published it.

 

Brett I'm glad your going to build it. Treat it like armor and you'll have fun with the build. Tomorrow I plan to test paint schemes.

 

If you aren't having fun, you're doing it wrong! Build to please yourself and they will flame you every time!

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:07 AM

Thanks for the tip, I think I've seen the ads for the book around the magazine. I'll check it out! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    June, 2016
  • From: Portland, OR
Posted by Boxcar_Bret on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:26 AM

I jumped in hip deep last night and continued with the sub-assemblies. I'm really losing myself building this kit. Last night I sat down but my entire iTunes library on shuffle and had about an hour and a half of Bret-time.

My gripe about mold marks was limited to the aforementioned parts and assembly was a dream. The idea of assembling as you go and then tearing it down for paint and reassembling is still a new concept to me for model until I realized it's what you do with custom motorcycles.

I discovered two powerful new tools. One is taking pictures to discover seams or other areas that aren't quite as nice as you think and need some more love.That said, I don't think I've given a project so much attention in the sanding department.

The other discovery I'll put in a separate post. Oh, and Tamiya Extra Thin Cement rocks. Cheers!

  • Member since
    June, 2016
  • From: Portland, OR
Posted by Boxcar_Bret on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 11:56 PM

Glued those little rivets on tonight. You know what's fun? Trying to trim those little bastards without sending them flying into oblivion.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, June 23, 2016 11:07 AM

Ohhhhhhhhhh, looking really cool so far!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    June, 2016
  • From: Portland, OR
Posted by Boxcar_Bret on Saturday, June 25, 2016 2:58 PM

Taking a suggestion from Mike J. Rather than suffering from an emotional breakdown cutting, trimming, sanding and gluing the tiny rivets that came with the kit I opted to use pinheads. This idea was fairly simple and for having never done it before the process I came up with seemed pretty intuitive. Here's how I did it...

1. Using a pin vise I drilled a hole slightly smaller than the straight pin itself.




2. Carefully pushed the pin though the plastic.




3. A drop of Insta-Cure+ CA and shot of kicker to glue it in place.




4. Once the glue was set I snipped of the extra length of pin. BE CAREFUL with this step! The excess will fly off. Hindsight being 20/20 next time I do this I'll put a little blob of Blu-Tac on the end of the pin to prevent it from flying.





It looks really cool and I think the varying shapes of the heads give it some visual interest and texture to the surface. I can't wait to see it primed. Thanks Mike J. for the suggestion!

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: California
Posted by SprueOne on Saturday, June 25, 2016 3:11 PM

Nice technique predrilling the hole for the pin shank Idea 

Anyone with a good car don't need to be justified - Hazel Motes

 

Iron Rails 2015 by Wayne Cassell Weekend Madness sprueone

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, June 26, 2016 8:32 AM

Oh those look neat, much more even and regular than just cementing knobs to the surface. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    October, 2009
  • From: South La
Posted by Ti4019 on Sunday, June 26, 2016 2:10 PM

Looks great. I love pinheads and use jewelry seed beads as well as a jewelry pin that has a flat vs rounded head. It varies the shape and is easier to cut than straight sewing pins. 

 

Please continue the progress photos I'm looking forward to starting mine. 

 

If you aren't having fun, you're doing it wrong! Build to please yourself and they will flame you every time!

  • Member since
    August, 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 2:42 PM

I don't build this kind of stuff, so was going to skip the post; Boy glad I didn't.

This looks really cool and your excitement is contagious. Count me in to be looking in and taking notes Yes

 

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    June, 2016
  • From: Portland, OR
Posted by Boxcar_Bret on Sunday, July 17, 2016 6:42 PM

DUSTER

I don't build this kind of stuff, so was going to skip the post; Boy glad I didn't.

This looks really cool and your excitement is contagious. Count me in to be looking in and taking notes Yes

 

Thanks, Duster! I appreciate that. I've been working on another kit to practice my painting chops but I hope to have an update on this build soon.

 

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by RinnyR on Sunday, February 25, 2018 8:31 PM

Great idea with the pin heads for rivets, brett! I've also used something I found at Hobby Lobby called "Steampunk Dust". It's a bag chock full of tiny mechancial parts...really small stuff, and many tiny rivet shaped pieces. Take a look if you see in on the shelf! Really cool stuff!

 

Hey Bret, I'm just reading this for the first time and want to see the finished Mech! Don't leave me hanging! Did you get it done? I have a MK mech in my stash that I'm both eager and intimidated to work on, so I'd love to see your finished result! Appreciate your enthusiasm!

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Sunday, February 25, 2018 11:42 PM

I have one too! Let's do it!  Yes

 

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/6/t/175575.aspx

 

 

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