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Finished RX-78-2 weathered 1/48

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  • Member since
    December, 2014
Finished RX-78-2 weathered 1/48
Posted by tacocat on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 6:48 PM

Finished off this 1/48th RX-78-2 finally. Weathering got a bit heavy-handed, but fun trying new techniques. Tamiya Acrylics with AK weathering products; streaking grime, engine grime, pigments, etc.

 Finished RX-78-2 by Robb Gibbs, on Flickr

Tags: gundam , gunpla , mecha
  • Member since
    October, 2010
Posted by hypertex on Wednesday, February 08, 2017 7:38 AM

I like it!

  • Member since
    December, 2014
Posted by tacocat on Wednesday, February 08, 2017 8:45 PM

Thanks a ton, hypertex! Cheers.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Wednesday, February 08, 2017 9:23 PM
Nice!
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, February 12, 2017 6:59 PM

I know nothing about mecha but that's some really nice work! Love the weathering.

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    April, 2011
  • From: Silver Spring, MD
Posted by badlanguage on Monday, February 13, 2017 2:32 PM

Hey Tacocat, I saw this thing on gundamforums and was just like damn. I meant to ask you about your weathering - what's your technique? I haven't really attempted a seriously grimy, lived-in mobile suit yet but would love to do it right!

  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: Washington State
Posted by leemitcheltree on Sunday, April 16, 2017 5:43 PM

Gundam really isn't a genre I'm interested in.....but THAT thing....is beautifully painted and weathered.  Well done, mate.  That looks great!

Thanks for sharing the pics!

Hey - any hints or tips on what you've done?  What paints?  What washes?  I'd love to hear more about what you've done.  I have a Votoms Brutishdog that is 50% built (and a bunch of Maschinen Krieger in the stash) and I'd LOVE some hints and tips on how to reproduce your great look.

Cheers, LeeTree Remember, Safety Fast!!!
  • Member since
    December, 2014
Posted by tacocat on Monday, April 17, 2017 11:50 AM

Hey leemitcheltree + badlanguage – Thanks for the nice words. Really appreciate it!

To be honest, I leaned pretty heavily on the steps outlined in Mig Jimenez's book, "In Combat: Painting Mechas".

http://www.migjimenez.com/en/books/457--in-combat-painting-mechas.html

But to break it down really briefly, I'd say:

1.) Prime with Mr. Surfacer 1500

2.) Mix Tamiya colors until you're happy w/ the color combination and lay down clean colors of the mech's base colors

3.) Preserve base coat w/ layer of Future

4.) Chip heavily w/ brown paint and silver paint (depending on the area of the mech), using tiny, tiny brush and trying to place chips in places where they'd occur naturally, ie, along protruding edges, near seams, places where it'd get banged up. Also try to not make them uniform all over, although I wish I'd have taken my own advice a bit more for that...

5.) Lay down some hairspray on places where you wanna do the streaking grime effect (i did it on the upper legs/crotch) and then spray some streaking grime from your airbrush on these spots and chip it off a bit (with a stiff brush and some water) to have a nice contrast in weathering from all the chips you painted all over the place

6.) Do some engine grime, streaking grime, wherever it looks natural to have the dripping down, grimey effect. Do this by painting it near chips or seams or whever and then wiping it downward w/ some spirits and a clean brush to soften the edge and make it look like it's running downward w/ gravity. I probably should have done this a bit more, you can see it a bit on the yellow squares near his crotch – The drips beneath them. I'm not the best at this so tend to not do it too much.

7.) Throw some rust/dirt colored dust pigment in joints or near the feet where dirt/dust would accumulate at the end for another contrast in weathering technique to the chips and grime.

The bulk of the work on this model came from getting the base colors looking the way I wanted them to and all the masking (w/ tamiya tape) that that required. The model came in colored plastic already, but the colors were a bit gross so it was a big decision to commit to all the masking. Also had to wipe parts back to bare plastic a few times due to poor masking. Bleh. But once I was happy w/ the base colors, I tried to lock them in w/ a solid coat of future which made the model pretty durable for the weathering ahead. The next most time-consuming part came from painting all the chips w/ the tiniest brush. This was easily a few solid days. Yikes. And from there, the engine grime and pigments were pretty quick little touches at the end the bring contrast the all the chips (which in my case, were a bit too monotonous and uniform, allowing the grime and pigments to hopefully lend some contrast).

Hope that helps! Let me know if you have any questions. And totally check out Mig's book because I was really just pulling from his techniques all along.

Cheers and thanks again!

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