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AMT Star Trek Mr. Spock

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  • Member since
    April, 2015
AMT Star Trek Mr. Spock
Posted by Mark Lookabaugh on Saturday, October 06, 2018 6:31 PM

This is my 4th attempt at this kit.  I tried it twice in the 70's as a young child (with the results you might expect), and then again about 5 years ago when I became so frustrated with the fit of the snakes that I gave up.

The end of the phaser was drilled out with a pin vise and a bit of thin copper wire was inserted to form a proper "barrel" to the phaser.  The communicator lid has decals printed on an ink jet - with many attempts made until the scale of the dots looked OK.  I debated for a long time whether to do "reptilian" eyes for the snakes, or simple dots.  In the end, the dots seemed to convey the evil snake look better.  It was painted with Citadel colors and washes, and finished with a mix of gloss coat and dull coat as appropriate.

One of the nicest things about this build was taking the pictures.  I highly recommend the "AmazonBasics Portable Photo Studio".  It was about $140, and was exactly as advertised: a super quick and easy way to take decent pics.  Here's a link the page (for some reason, searching "AmazonBasics Portable Photo Studio" doesn't bring this up as the top item... who knows why):  https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-EP53-010723-Portable-Photo-Studio/dp/B01GIL6EU4/

This was a lot of fun to build, and brought back a lot of good memories. 

Thanks for looking!

Mark

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, October 06, 2018 8:28 PM

A+ for persistence, Mark.

And you did a fine job, too. I couldn't paint a figure to save my soul. You have here a fine tribute to Leonard Nimoy, far as I'm concerned.

On your new lightbox, I have thousands of dollars of lighting equipment downstairs, your pics from your new box put mine to shame. Simplicity wins again. Thanks for the link.

-Greg

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, October 07, 2018 12:00 PM

Looking good, better than my "all new" Star Trek: The Motion Picture Mr. Spock kit I had. Which I believe was a retool of the original without the alien snake. He was in a different suit.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Sunday, October 07, 2018 1:25 PM

That's excellent!  

Good work!

 

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  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mark Lookabaugh on Sunday, October 07, 2018 2:46 PM

Thank you!

Rob, I always wondered about that.  After they retooled the original molds, how did they get them back in shape to reproduce the first version again?  Those molds must be expensive!

There was a good article a while back on converting the "new" spock to a classic version for a bridge diorama in the mag a while back.  Hope you were able to catch that one.

Mark

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, October 07, 2018 3:21 PM

Mark Lookabaugh
After they retooled the original molds, how did they get them back in shape to reproduce the first version again?

There's to kinds of "retooling" in the injection moulding industry.

There's "production run" tooling.  Thene there is "product change" tooling.

To create the moulds, there's usually a master set of tooling generated whic his the master from which the production tooling can be cut.  These are typically steel blocks which have index points where they mate to plastic injection ports, and quite often, water cooling channels).  The tooling is then fit into the injection moulding machines and a production run.  When the run is complete, the mould are pulled out for the next run of moulds.

Back in the day, the tool and die makers would plan for where the ersion of the moulding process could be cleaned up to increase the life of the moulds. 

But, all moulds wear.

Sometimes that wear is factored in and that determines the number of moulds cut.  Sometimes it is not.  In our modern era where CNC machinery can help automate cutting of moulds, a factry can achieve some ecomomies.  Like the master mould model can be digital and not physical, so the master des not suffer from pantograph wear.  Also, if your process engineering has identified that you need to make 88,000 "shots" to get the correct number of shots through QC, you can get 8 CNC-cut moulds rather than 10, perhaps.

To keep this complicated, there are technological changes in the injection moulding machines themselves.  So, when we read that Company X has bought the tooling frmerly used by Company Q, it's not always obvious whether that includes moulding machines or just the moulds, or the whle kit and kaboodle.

This industrial stuff gets deep pretty quick.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, October 07, 2018 6:06 PM

Mark Lookabaugh

Thank you!

Rob, I always wondered about that.  After they retooled the original molds, how did they get them back in shape to reproduce the first version again?  Those molds must be expensive!

There was a good article a while back on converting the "new" spock to a classic version for a bridge diorama in the mag a while back.  Hope you were able to catch that one.

Mark

 

A lot of reverse molding was done to recreate old molds that were destroyed or changed. Like the ancient Aurora Spider-Man kit, one of the ones I think Monogram scrapped, was recreated by finding a copy of the old Aurora kit and making a new mold from it.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, October 07, 2018 6:06 PM

Beautiful job on the classic kit there Mark!

 

Kudos!!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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