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Worst kit I ever built!

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  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Worst kit I ever built!
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Monday, February 15, 2021 8:14 PM

I recently bought a vintage Star Trek kit at a cheap clearance price.  The vendor was very up-front in describing possible problems because of its age, but I decided to buy it just for something to do, while hiding from the virus.

This is a model of Capt. Piquard's NCC-1701-D Enterprise, made by AMT / ERTL circa 1995.  It has a fiber optic lighting feature.  Believe me, this would be impossible to install as directed.  1000 (or so) glass fibers, about the diameter of a human hair, need to be inserted one by one into tiny holes that you must drill all over the hulls!  Then you must glue each one of them with CA or whatever, and trim off the excess on the outside after you paint the model!  Poor design at the least, along with many other crude problems and design flaws.

Anyhow, I made a plausible model out of it, without the fiber optics but with incandescent bulbs in the warp engine.  

I'm not complaining because I knew what I was getting into, but I had no idea the fiber optics would be an impossible situation.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, February 16, 2021 11:55 AM

Oh gee friggin' whiz! I think I have the kit of DS9 with the same fiber optics cables and tiny battery powered drill around somewhere. And yes it's horrible too. I mean both NCC-1701D and DS9 have oval shaped portholes/windows and the cable gives you just a tiny light- I guess it might look okay from a distance and in the dark but I don't see how it would work that well any other way. 

Would love to see what you did with her! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Tuesday, February 16, 2021 1:48 PM

Well, it ended up in weathered, blended shades of blue and green.  I used Doc O'Brien's weathering powders.  It is supposed to be a "duck egg blue", similar to the color of the plastic, but I got carried away, and it looks pretty wild.  It is definitely not "monochrome".  There are huge gaps on the top and bottom of the saucer where the neck connects- the whole thing was such a crappy kit that I didn't want to waste paint, nor filler, nor further effort.  I'll display it for awhile and then probably stash it away.

I cannot believe any company would market a kit with that fiber optic arrangement.  I'll bet no one, including the designers, ever actually built one.  They give you one tiny drill bit with a special shank and a recessed pin drive in the drill to spin it.  I have never seen a shank/chuck/collet like that before.  If you could drill 5 holes before breaking off the drill, you'd be lucky.  They were kind enough to include a postcard that allowed the buyer to purchase additional drill bits, at $5.00 each!

Anyhow, I got a good laugh out of the whole experience and it kept me busy for awhile.

(Sorry, I don't do the photo posting thing.)

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, February 17, 2021 11:22 AM

Yeah the drill is horrible and the fiber optic cable hardly even workable. I can't see anyone going though the trouble of setting whole thing up. 

Personally I think I'd just hang her from the ceiling and call it a day! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Wednesday, February 17, 2021 1:39 PM

Agreed!  Or, you could bronze it and call it an antique.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, February 17, 2021 6:44 PM

Hi;

 I can name you one just as bad. Before the Titanic flurry I bought the very old first release of her."Oh, what a nice T.V. light she would make" Quoteth the then Wifey.

 So Diligently I drilled out All the portholes and windows. Even some spots (Hidden) to show light on the stacks. So a couple of bucks later she got her lit portholes. And everything else! It took me seven months.

    I will NEVER do that kind of thing again!!

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Saturday, February 20, 2021 11:12 AM

The base kit, The Next Generation Enterprise-D is actually from 1988. I built one as a young lieutenant in Germany. While it was a superior Star Trek model than AMT/Ertl made for the original series, it still was not what was considered a "good" model even by 1980s standards.

There wasn't a "good" Star Trek starship model until Monogram got the license to produce the USS Voyager and a couple of the enemy vessels from that series in 1996.

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