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Away all boats!

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Philippines
Away all boats!
Posted by constructor on Thursday, June 02, 2011 5:31 PM

I was looking at the painting instruction of my USS Montrose/Randall and the waterline paint only ask for flat black. Are they not painted hull red below the anti-fouling black?

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Carmel, CA
Posted by bondoman on Thursday, June 02, 2011 6:39 PM

Ah but there's the rub. That model is sort of "light" in the water. Since it is not realistically a full hull, you have to decide whether any of the anti-fouling shows, if you are putting it on a water base.

These pictures are from Navsource, taken February 1964 at Richmond, CA.

I've usually cut the Revell flat bottoms down some to represent the loaded waterline, in which case the boot just shows.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Philippines
Posted by constructor on Thursday, June 02, 2011 11:51 PM

Looking all the way down to the bottom, it looks like it really is painted black.

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Carmel, CA
Posted by bondoman on Friday, June 03, 2011 1:05 AM

Could be. looks red to me, or more correctly all over scummy.

Which is a whole other discussion re: ship models.

But the Revell flat bottoms- the T2, the C3, the VC2 (your model) and the seaplane tender all look stupid on those girder stands. Best to model them in the water. In which case about all you see in pictures of APA's is a black boot.

My T2

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Friday, June 03, 2011 1:13 AM

bondoman

Could be. looks red to me, or more correctly all over scummy.

 

I concur with "scummy". After leaving drydock, all nice and freshly painted, a ship's hull paint quickly goes South. It doesn't take long at all to go from red to dead (as in dead seagrowth).

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, June 03, 2011 8:58 AM

I think the black applies to the "boot topping" a strip of black that goes between the upper hull color and the anti-fouling color of the bottom.  The boot topping is right at the waterline, and varies in width from ship to ship.  On some ships it is pretty wide.  So on a waterline model it may be the only thing you see other than the hull color.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Friday, June 03, 2011 2:53 PM

Exactly.

The boot topping is there to "cover" the range of drafts a vessel has operationally.  On a ship, like an oiler, or  APA or AKA, which is designed to go out loaded and come back empty, for Naval purposes, that ship needs a very wide boot top.

This is less significant in commercial shipping, where the boot top is just a "cheater" to neaten up the color demarcation.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Philippines
Posted by constructor on Friday, June 03, 2011 6:27 PM

On the model USS Montrose, the rudder could be seen, which means is not waterline nor is it full hull. So how far up based on the rudder should the boot topping be?

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Carmel, CA
Posted by bondoman on Friday, June 03, 2011 6:53 PM

Here's somewhat funky little drawing, but it looks about right to me.

http://www.ussmenard.com/shipsclass.html

I did a simple little on-screen scaling exercise and I got 18' of freeboard the way that it is drawn.

You can also see just the post and top of the rudder.

  • Member since
    May, 2010
Posted by amphib on Tuesday, June 14, 2011 10:20 AM

Constructor

Been away for a while so I just caught your discussion. Having been part of the crew of a Haskell class APA I can tell you that on our ship the top of the boot toppiing was about on line with the top of the rudder and extended down about six feet. The model is missing approximately the bottom 12 feet of the hull and Revell saw fit to eliminate the screw and move the rudder forward into the space it normally occupied. That screw by the way was about 20 feet in diameter

Amphib

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by cwbandbuff on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:57 AM

CHECKING PHOTOS GOOGLED OF BOTH RANDALL PA-24 AND MONTROSE PA-212IT APPEARS THAT THE MODEL(S) HAVE THE MOLDED IN WATERLINE ABOUT 10 FEET TOO LOW, COMPARED TO THE DISTANCE OF THE REAL SHIPS' BOOT TOPPING TO LOWEST MIDSHP DECK.  IF THE TOPPING WERE 6-8 SCALE FEET UP FROM THE MOLDED WATERLINE IT WOULD IT DEEPER AND MORE REALISTICALLY.

BOB PHILBIN

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, February 15, 2018 8:24 AM

Hi Bob ;

 Hey  ,thanks for the input .Could you please not yell ? ( Printing in all caps is yelling on the page ). I always cut the bottoms off and re glued the very bottom back on so the ships sit lower . The Ocala Victory looked like that at half load . T.B

  • Member since
    May, 2010
Posted by amphib on Thursday, February 15, 2018 9:06 AM

T.B

Having the Marad lines drawing I went back and did it another way. I added back the 12' that that was missing. Interestingly the Marad drawings show the full load water line for a Victory as 28'. I distinctly remember the draft for the  Haskell APA I was on as being somewhere between 19' and 21'. So she would be riding 7' higher in the water than a full loaded Victory. That would probably make the boot toping lower and more of the side of the ship haze gray which is what the photos seem to show.

Amphib

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