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1/700 Ship Models

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  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Lebanon
1/700 Ship Models
Posted by jeffriesr on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:07 PM

I find that since I have grown older (retirement), it is almost impossible to find the dexterity in my fingers to handle the small parts associated with 1/700 ship models.  I use tweezers, small forceps, and opti-magnifiers, but it is still frustrating. The parts still get away from me.

I guess I'll stick to 1/72, 1/48, and 1/35 aircraft and armored vehicles. At least if a part from a military vehicle gets lost, I can claim battle damage.

1/350 and larger ship models cost too much.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:46 PM

 Jeff,

I have become interested in larger scale models of smaller ships.

Like you, I can't build at 1/700 to my satisfaction. And 1/350 are basically warships, which I have a limited interest in.

But with the suggestion of the late Dr. Tilley, I've dipped into things like fishing schooners. I'm currently building the 1/60 yacht America, and the1/144  Snowberry corvette. I'm working on drawings for a 76 foot purse seiner, which at 1/60 scale is about 15 inches long.

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 7:49 PM

Hi,

Along the lines of what GMorrison says above, I too have started looking into larger scale models of smaller ships.  Currently I have;

1/72 scale Flower class corvette

1/125 scale Minesweeper 

1/130 scale USS Defiance (Gunboat) 

1/144 scale Type 143 Fast Attack Craft

1/200 scale Le Suriot Research Vessel

1/285 scale USCG Ice Breaker

1/288 scale USS Landing Ship Dock

1/300 scale RV Meteor Research Vessel

All waiting to be built.  Although I haven't started any of these kits yet, in looking them over, the larger sized pieces and components really appeal to me and look like they have lots of potential either straight out of the box, or as kits you can modify and detail as much as you wish Smile

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, November 09, 2017 6:55 AM

I, too, have shifted to larger models of smaller ships.  However, I am into warships of all eras, so much of my building lately has focused on plank-on-bulkhead and solid hull sailing ships.  Yes, I am aware that there are accuracy problems with many of these kits, but correcting these is part of the fun.  I am also into the 1/72 U-Boats and submarines.  I might try that 1/48 U-Boat, but I haven't yet decided.  Also, I like the 1/144 to 1/180 sailing ships by Revell, Airfix, and some by Heller (as long as they are of historic ships and are not  fantasies).

Bill

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Thursday, November 09, 2017 8:32 AM

The older I get, the harder it seems to build in 1/700, but I do not have the space to display or store anything larger.  At present, I am on a roll with wanting to build in 1/700.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, November 09, 2017 8:54 AM

I have become a believer in the "use it or loose it" theory.  I have run out of display space, and that makes me want to build smaller scale stuff.  I have decided to build more 1:700 ships and 1:72 aircraft.  I have been noticing some loss of manual dexterity, but finding I can make up for it by doing more of the fine detail work. I believe this is helping.

Vision problems are easier to fix- good optical aids and brighter lighting help.  But the dexterity is a tougher nut to crack.  But I remember something that happened a number of years ago.  I was trying to learn to play piano, and found that I got along fine as long as I was just using my right hand.  I thought I would never be able to do much with my left hand.  But then a friend pointed out that I am a touch typist, and use both hands for that!  He was right.  Okay, it takes a lot of practice to build and maintain fine motor skills.  So as I am fumbling with those tweezers, I think I just need to do more of that kind of work, not less.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Lebanon
Posted by jeffriesr on Thursday, November 09, 2017 9:24 AM
Doing more and using fingers more make a lot of sense. If you don't use it, you lose it principle. Thanks Don.
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Lebanon
Posted by jeffriesr on Thursday, November 09, 2017 9:26 AM
Space is a problem in my office, and my wife won't give me more space(imagine that). I guess I'm sticking to 1/700. I'll just have to build more to keep my skills sharp. Thanks Scott.
  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Hokey on Thursday, November 09, 2017 10:20 AM

Don Stauffer

I have become a believer in the "use it or loose it" theory.  I have run out of display space, and that makes me want to build smaller scale stuff.  I have decided to build more 1:700 ships and 1:72 aircraft.  I have been noticing some loss of manual dexterity, but finding I can make up for it by doing more of the fine detail work. I believe this is helping.

Vision problems are easier to fix- good optical aids and brighter lighting help.  But the dexterity is a tougher nut to crack.  But I remember something that happened a number of years ago.  I was trying to learn to play piano, and found that I got along fine as long as I was just using my right hand.  I thought I would never be able to do much with my left hand.  But then a friend pointed out that I am a touch typist, and use both hands for that!  He was right.  Okay, it takes a lot of practice to build and maintain fine motor skills.  So as I am fumbling with those tweezers, I think I just need to do more of that kind of work, not less.

 

After fumbling with tiny phot etch parts yesterday I'm going out of my mind! 67 yeards old and all thumbs!

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, November 09, 2017 1:11 PM

All the repitition and practice won't help those of us suffering from arthritis in the fingers and knuckles.  Believe me, I have tried.  There are some things that my fingers will no longer do. That is one of the reasons I have shifted to larger models.  Oh, well . . .

Bill

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Friday, November 10, 2017 3:04 AM

Since I'm just a young 64 with bifocals and still in the early stages of the return of Dupuytren's Contracture (look it up) in the hands, I am still delighted to work with 1/700 ships.

For the small parts, I have a special pair of very soft-action tweezers to minimize the cross-room launches, Optivisor to see up close and three desk lamps to maximize the light.

:-)

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, November 10, 2017 9:03 AM

warshipguy

All the repitition and practice won't help those of us suffering from arthritis in the fingers and knuckles.  Believe me, I have tried.  There are some things that my fingers will no longer do. That is one of the reasons I have shifted to larger models.  Oh, well . . .

Bill

 

I do have osteoarthritis in the fingers- maybe not as bad as yours. I do find, if I take a trip or for some reason stop modeling for a week or two, then getting back at it is hard.  Winter is harder too.  I found I need to have a heater in my basement shop and keep the temp up.  I can still rig planes and ships with 5 mil monofilament though I practice my expletives pronounciation when I do. 

Cataract removal sure helped my eyesight, though with thread that size I still need to insert appropriate background behind model to get enough contrast to see it.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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