SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Trumpy's 1/350 USS Cole

1303 views
13 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Trumpy's 1/350 USS Cole
Posted by ridleusmc on Friday, January 05, 2018 10:33 AM

Hello everybody,

This project was a challenge.  I started it in September, so it's only been about 3 and a half months.  Ships are tough.  Trumpeter makes a nicely detailed kit.  The fit is pretty good, but not quite perfect.

  

 IMG_2335 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

I had challenges with a large step between the upper and lower hull.  There was some filling and sanding.  The base was cut from poplar, and the supporting columns are lamp finial extensions.  Bolts go up from the bottom of the base, the finial extensions run from the base to the ship, and nuts in the hull mate with the finials.  The nuts are held in the hull with milliput.    

 

 IMG_2386 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2387 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2385 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

    

 IMG_2384 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The main deck fit well,

 

 IMG_2388 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

but there were minor gaps at the aft end of the main deck.

 

 IMG_2390 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

Regardless of their complexity, the superstructures went together well.  I used some slower setting cement to give me time to install and align all of the sides of the structure.  

 

 IMG_2453 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

It's starting to look like a boat!  

 

 IMG_2456 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

Honestly, basic construction was the easy part.  Painting was challenging, so was touch-up painting.  Applying PE was challenging, and so was re-applying PE.  I'm not good with gluing PE "just once."  I gave everything a black base.  

 

 IMG_2462 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2463 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

Blackhawk Seahawk (SH-60B from Trumpeter). 

 

 IMG_2497 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The hull is painted with about a 50:50 mix of Tamiya Red (XF-7) and Hull Red (XF-9).  Horizontal surfaces were painted with German Grey (XF-63).  

 

 IMG_2496 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

There was a whole lot of masking.  

 

 IMG_2502 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The vertical surfaces got Sky Grey (XF-19).  

 

 IMG_2504 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 IMG_2505 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2506 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2507 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The deck marking were masked and airbrushed with white and red.  

 

 IMG_2585 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

Some convincing was needed to make the forward superstructure sit flush on the main deck.  

 

 IMG_2608 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

There were still seams to be filled, sanded, and repainted.

 

 IMG_2609 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

I did the multitude of little detail parts in batches.  There was the forward deck details, aft deck details, forward superstructure details, and aft superstructure details.  

 

 IMG_2625 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The mast was a fun little assembly, and it benefited greatly from the Gold Medal Models PE.  

 

 IMG_2632 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

After painting, EZ Line rigging was installed.  I assured I left plenty of extra line.  Holes were drilled in the plastic "Flag Bags" to be an anchor point for the rigging.  The mast was glued to the superstructure.  I ran the forward lines over their appropriate horns with a minimum of tension in the line.  An alligator clip tool held the line in place while the CA glue dried.  

 

 IMG_2680 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The aft lines were run through the holes in the "Flag bags."  Again, they were held with a minimum of tension while the glue dried.  

 

 IMG_2688 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2690 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The flight deck netting was glued to a brass rod.  The rod depicts the hinged tube to which the netting mounts.  

 

 IMG_2692 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The flight deck netting took some creative supports to facilitate gluing.  

 

 IMG_2696 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2697 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

My buddy Sherman was happy to review the ship's construction and painting.

 

 IMG_2693 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

She's getting close.

 

 IMG_2699 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2701 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

I applied some Pledge Floor Care (Future) and moved on to the decals.

 

PFC (Future) was applied to seal the decals.  I used a little AK Interactive Streaking Grime for Light Grey Ships (AK 305) for weathering.  It was diluted with AK's thinner (049).  I let it rest in deck and bulkhead details, and it was streaked down bilge outlets on the hull.  I didn't want to go too heavy on the weathering.  I was going for a new but active ship.  

 

 IMG_2709 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

I used Model Master Lusterless (Flat) Laquer Overcoat from a rattle can to apply the final dull coats.  This is my old stand-by.  I've experimented with other dull-coats, but MM is still my favorite.  I very carefully installed the lamp finials to the ship, then I applied the ship to the base.  

 

 IMG_2712 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

I guess I'm done.  There's a name plate coming from Crown Awards.  It should show up tomorrow.  She really looks good to my eye, but constructive criticism is welcome.  

 

 IMG_2713 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2715 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2716 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2717 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2718 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2719 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2720 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2721 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2722 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2723 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2724 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2725 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2726 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2727 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2728 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2729 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2730 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2731 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2732 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2734 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2735 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

DD-670 and DDG-67, USS Dortch and USS Cole, look great together.  

 

 IMG_2739 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

 IMG_2740 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

The flag commemorates my Great Uncle.  He served the US Navy from 1940 to 1970.  He spent the Second World War on the Dortch.  He passed before the USS Cole was commissioned, but I think he'd approve.

 

 IMG_2741 by Christopher Ridle, on Flickr

 

I think I'll switch gears for the next build.  It may be an Fw 190, Tiger 1, or CH-46.  I'm thinking my next ship may be a Dreadnought, but I'll take some time to think about it.

 

Thank you for looking,  

 

Chris 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Friday, January 05, 2018 12:13 PM

Nicely done on both. Rigging drives me totally nuts.  Your Great Uncle is smiling down from above.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Friday, January 05, 2018 12:23 PM

Chris,

Wow! She looks spectacular! I see you painted the deck markings; did you use a pre-made mask, or did you create your own mask? 

 Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Friday, January 05, 2018 12:29 PM

Thank you Goldhammer, thank you Hogfanfs,

The deck markings were masked with Tamiya masking tape.  I have a small circle cutter.  It came in handy for the helicopter pad.  I did have some underspray which I cleaned up with the paintbrush.    

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, January 05, 2018 1:26 PM

Very nice!  Really striking visual

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Friday, January 05, 2018 6:35 PM

Very clean, meticulous work! You nailed the PE railings - I usually bend the heck out of some sections and pray they don't break while I'm trying to glue down a line. I also admire the very subtle weathering/dirt/rust from the scuppers. Looks very real to me.

I need to add that your rigging is top notch as well. I'm not sure if the line you used is correct scale-wise though. Looks a bit large in diameter to me.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Friday, January 05, 2018 9:35 PM

Hi,

Your build looks great Surprise

Pat

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Friday, January 05, 2018 9:42 PM

Chris, take it from a Navy Vet. Your Great Uncle is very impressed as I am. Only one little jab at ya, all in fun.  You referred to it as a "Boat"  to us Navy guys, Boats sink, Ships float Big Smile

I have this same model in my pile of to do eventually, after several Tall ships and numerous 1/32 warbirds. Your build is an inspiration for me.   Dale

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Friday, January 05, 2018 11:56 PM

Thank you keavdog, 1943Mike, PFJN and LIVIT,

1943Mike, you have a point.  EZ Line was originally produced to represent electrical and telephone cables for HO train layouts.  It was all the rage for ship rigging about 10 years ago.  It actually has more of a rectangular cross section as opposed to circular.  It seems a bit thick, but its cross section and elasticity make it easy with which to work.  I can check out different products for my next ship.  I also use it for antenna aerial wire on aircraft.  I've use a few feet, but there are miles left on the roll.  Your constructive criticism is noted, and I will definately keep it in mind for future builds.  Thank you. 

LIVIT, You know us jarheads.  If it's big, grey, and floats, we'll stick our thumbs up for a ride.  We use to call deployments on gator freighters as going on, "The Boat."  I'll correct that, the Arleigh-Burkes are beautful Ships.      

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, January 06, 2018 2:59 AM

A beautiful build.
Sadly, Trumpy led you astray as to how the rigging works.

In reality, all of the signal halyards go back to the flag bags at the aft end of the bridge.

There are no guy cables or the like supporting the mast at all.

Looks good as is.  Just a tad odd if you've walked the decks of an OHP.

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • From: providence ,r.i.
Posted by templar1099 on Saturday, January 06, 2018 5:31 AM

Outstanding job, nicely weathered.  Got a couple of ships but won't even look at them yet.

"le plaisir delicieux et toujours nouveau d'une occupation inutile"

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Saturday, January 06, 2018 3:18 PM

Thank you Templar, Thank you CapnMac, 

CapnMac, 

I appreciate your constructive criticism.  Your eye and knowledge are certainly valuable.  You pointed out the missing sonar fairing on the USS Dortch a few months ago.  However, I believe you may be mistaken in this case.  From the picture you posted, at greatest possible size, I can make out the lines running from the upper yard arms to "horns" just above the bridge windows.  It's difficult to make out because the lines are so thin on the actual ships.  I do want to take constructive criticism as a grown up, but I think we are seeing two different things.  

Thank you CapnMac, I do appreciate your input.  

Chris

  • Member since
    June, 2017
Posted by Chemteacher on Saturday, January 06, 2018 8:18 PM
Wow! She looks great! Beautiful work.

On the bench: Revell/Monogram A-10 (trying to rescue from the shelf of doom)

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Saturday, January 06, 2018 8:47 PM

Thank you Chemteacher!

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.