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Order of Rigging

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  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Order of Rigging
Posted by BigJim on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 9:51 PM

I am looking for ideas on what is the best order to do sailing ship rigging so that one doesn't get all tangled up? Starting point,working which way?

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 11:39 PM

I put all the lower mast's in , then your fore, main , mizzen stay's , then the shroud's , fore to mizzen , and rat line's , I find this give's you a very steady base , then work up , fore to mizzen .

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, February 08, 2018 7:07 AM

What Steve mentioned is stuff called the standing rigging.  It is permanent and usually tarred, so it is the black rigging.  The white or tan stuff is called the running rigging, which are the lines used daily to run the ship.  The normal order is to do all the standing stuff first, then move on to the running rigging.

This will not prevent all tricky conflicts- the lines for a lot of the running rigging terminates near the mast on the decks, and this area can be a little hard to get to when the standing rigging is in place, but the general rule above does simplify life.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, February 08, 2018 7:25 AM

I fully concur with Steve and Don. I also recommend having good references for rigging.  The rigging plans usually provided by kit manufacturers are frequently very general and incorrect. Also, it is important to understand that different nations generally had their preferred techniques, and that techniques varied between time periods. But, there are general similiarities as well.  For example, British and French parrels differed in detail, but a parrel had the same purpose in both navies. Running rigging often attaches to belaying pins in the 18th and 19th centuries, but belaying pins were not common in the 17th century and before.

There are many references that you can use for rigging, but be sure to match references to the period and nationality of the ship you are rigging if possible.

Bill Morrison

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Thursday, February 08, 2018 7:59 AM

Good tips.
Thank you all!

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, February 08, 2018 8:51 AM

Jim,

I will send a list or references if you would like later today. I have one book that contains detailed drawings of all aspects of rigging.

Bill

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:40 AM

Add to the above a very general rule that it helps on ships to work "up and out", and that a lot of folks work "front to back".

So that'd be standing before running, up and out, front to back. Got it?

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, February 08, 2018 10:03 AM

Hmm;

 Good advice " G "  Even on modern ships there's a way to do this .Hull , deck , Houses and then Hardware . Then What rigging there is . Now , there is the step of rigging the lifeboats .That is only for ships before rescue Pods !

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Thursday, February 08, 2018 12:41 PM

warshipguy

Jim,

I will send a list or references if you would like later today. I have one book that contains detailed drawings of all aspects of rigging.

Bill

 

Thank you Bill, that would be very gracious of you.

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Thursday, February 08, 2018 2:26 PM

bill

 could I ask what book would that be please .

 

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, February 08, 2018 5:41 PM

Okay, here goes . . .

1. Historic Ship Models by Wolfram zu Mondfeld

2. The Rigging of Ships in the Days of the Spritsail Topmast, 1600-1720 (mostly text with limited pictures)

3. The Art of Rigging by George Biddlecombe (mostly 19th century, text and illustrations)

4. Rigging Period Ship Models by Lennarth Petersson (all detail drawings - MOST Highly Recommended)

5. The Masting and Rigging of English Ships of War by James Lees (Text and illustrations)

6. Eighteenth-Century Rigs & Rigging by Karl Heinz Marquardt (Text and illustrations)

I hope that this short list helps!

Bill

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Thursday, February 08, 2018 7:35 PM

Thank you Bill.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, February 08, 2018 8:28 PM

I vary abit from Steve.

I set shrouds first, then stays going forward.

This emulates the way the lines lay upon the mast.

So, I'm actually going bottom to top.

I also do not set the ratlines in the shrouds, as that leave the spaces between the shrouds more free to set running rigging through. 

I also set running rigging "backwards," starting from the belaying pin and then going aloft to the bitter end of the line.

Just my 2¢

  • Member since
    May, 2006
  • From: Irmo, South Carolina
Posted by Shipwreck on Sunday, February 11, 2018 6:58 AM
So when is a good time to install the masts?

On the Bench:

Revell 1/96 USS Constitution

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:42 PM

Shipwreck
So when is a good time to install the masts?

That's going to get a bunch of different answers.

Ideally, after you are finished fiddling about with the hull and after the uppermost deck is installed.

For me, the masts are in and out through out hull construction.  This to check rake of the masts, and also to track how much the chainplate reinforcements moulded into the hull are off line (some is pretty typical).  Also, stowing the masts in the hull between building sessions is a handy way to kepp them out of mischeif.

My 2¢

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:55 PM

If the design of the kit allows it, erect the masts in steps.

Mast (lower if there are multiples), top and topgallant.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, February 12, 2018 6:35 AM

GMorrison

If the design of the kit allows it, erect the masts in steps.

Mast (lower if there are multiples), top and topgallant.

 

Definitely.  Keeps the more fragile upper masts out of the way while you work the lower ones.  Rig the standing rigging on the lower masts before you add the topmasts, etc.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2006
  • From: Irmo, South Carolina
Posted by Shipwreck on Monday, February 12, 2018 6:53 AM
Thanks to all who responded to my mast question. That begs another question. The yards, would they be installed after the standing rigging is complete?

On the Bench:

Revell 1/96 USS Constitution

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Monday, February 12, 2018 7:23 AM

I always try to get the standing rigging done before installing the yards and running rigging.

Bill

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Russia, St.Peterburg
Posted by kirill4 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 12:43 AM

Good day, 

Shipwreck,

by my experience , better do it as You suggested -first, standing rigging, than  ,yards installation...I would like to add - with sail and all possible blocks and running rigging attached to the yard in advance!

All the best!

ps

personaly , I used to rigg masts one by one ...everything ...standing ,sails,running rigging ,try to rigg as much ropes as possible...when one mast entire completed  , than next could be started....

this rigging sequence  provide more free space around mast for rigging works...

Kirill

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 6:30 AM

Jim,

There is a fantastic thread over on that www.modelshipworld.com of a scratch build of HMS Pandora in which the builder has just started his rigging.  May I recommend that you check it out?  He is doing a wonderful job.

Bill

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 8:42 AM

Bill,
Your link does not work and I can't find anything searching for it. Would you have a better link?
Thank you

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 9:06 AM

Jim,

I don't know why the link isn't working. I tried it and it doesn't work for me either.  However, it does work if you simply type it in a web search.  You can also access it by doing a search for the Nautical Research Guild and click into Model Ship World Forums at the top of the page.  From there, simply click into the Scratch-Built section and the  Pandora.

Please let me know if you still can't find it.

Bill

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 9:22 PM

Bill,
I may have found it, however, whatever I found it says that I do not permission to view there.

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:47 AM

Jim,

You might have to create an account.  If you like, I'll try to find out for you.

Bill

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Thursday, February 15, 2018 7:21 PM

warshipguy
You might have to create an account.


Bill,
I think you are right. However, the $50/yr. membership fee is a little steep.

  • Member since
    June, 2011
  • From: St.Peters,Mo.
Posted by Mark Carroll on Thursday, February 15, 2018 9:37 PM

This is a much needed post,a lot of us,myself included,  get frustrated at rigging because there is so much to do and its the monotony of it also. I will keep a close eye on this!

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Thursday, February 15, 2018 10:39 PM

Bill,

I'm not sure if this is the thread you are talking about but give this link a try.

Steve

 

https://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/7073-pandora-by-marsalv-152/&

 

 

       

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Friday, February 16, 2018 6:11 AM

Jim,

There is no membership fee to access and use the forums. The $50.00 fee is to join the Nautical Research Guild.  The Forums are associated with the Guild, but it is not necessary to join in order to create an account for the forums.

Bill

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Friday, February 16, 2018 4:21 PM

OK, got 'er done! That was like pulling eye teeth! Wink
Thank you all for your patience.

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