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Securing boats, and torpedo nets

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Securing boats, and torpedo nets
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, February 08, 2018 10:43 AM

Working on my Lord Nelson, a pre-dreadnought battleship, and a couple of questions came up.

First, securing the ships boats.  This thing has three pretty good sized steam launches secured to chocks on upper deck.  Would these have been secured by wrapping lines around them like smaller boats, or would there have been some fancier method of securing them?

Second, color of torpedo nets.  There are PE nets, secured, but no color suggestions.  On my Dreadnought I painted the nets a rust color, a reddish brown, but I forget why.  Any opinions on what color those things were?  I assume these nets were made something like chain mail.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, February 08, 2018 10:57 AM

Take a look at the wiki article, for starters. I didn't know any of this, so will suggest there's probably more to it.

That article describes the use of something called a "Bullivant" net. It is described as 6.5" rings bound together with smaller rings, and weighing 1 lb. per square foot.

A little math figuring four rings per foot, times pi and throw in a little for the links, I figure 8 ft of wire per sq. ft. Cranked through a wire table, 8 ft of 0.2 inch wire weighs 1 lb.

It must have been rusty.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, February 08, 2018 11:17 AM

Here's a picture of Mikasa. She was built in England as well, about 10 years earlier.

I don't see anything like lashings over the boats. They are sitting in really deep cradles.

It reminds me that on these pre-dreads, the boats typically were handled by large cranes braced to the masts, not davits.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:18 PM

I would not be surprised if those cradles had a line that passed over them to keep the boats down in the chocks--far too small to be seen on a model (barring a microscope).

Torpedo nets seem to generate a lot of heated hyperbole, to no great good end.

My guess would be that the nets would have resembled oiled steel cables--call it Tamyia Gunmetal with a few drops of Black Chrome, then dry brushed (super lightly) with the hull color (mostly for some scale effect).

One of the more heated debate topics is to how the nets would have affected the hul paint by rubbing against it.  Some champion that the area under the nets ought be heavily scuffed and highly red rusty.  I'm willing to gues somebody in Naval Service thought about that, and sorted a solution which did not resemble a neglected garbage scow.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, February 09, 2018 7:01 AM

CapnMac82

 

My guess would be that the nets would have resembled oiled steel cables--call it Tamyia Gunmetal with a few drops of Black Chrome, then dry brushed (super lightly) with the hull color (mostly for some scale effect).

One of the more heated debate topics is to how the nets would have affected the hul paint by rubbing against it.  Some champion that the area under the nets ought be heavily scuffed and highly red rusty.  I'm willing to gues somebody in Naval Service thought about that, and sorted a solution which did not resemble a neglected garbage scow.

 

Thanks.  That was my original idea but I thought I'd better check.  I will put some very slight rust wash from the nets, probably a wet wash.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, February 09, 2018 9:49 AM

Don ;

 I seem to remember a fellow telling me that boats like those were secured with what he called  "Storm Bands " which were in essence large woven straps secured to the cradles and tightened with a ratchet assembly on the inside facing of the cradle .

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Tampa, Florida, USA
Posted by steves on Friday, February 09, 2018 10:19 AM

This photo of HMS Hood fitting out appears to show bands or straps simillar to what Tanker-Builder describes:

http://2014.f.a0z.ru/09/05-3583368-hms-hood57.jpg

Steve Sobieralski, Tampa Bay Ship Model Society

  • Member since
    May, 2010
Posted by amphib on Saturday, February 10, 2018 6:29 AM

I believe the proper name for the straps to secure boats in their chocks or cradles is GRIPES. I don't think any ship would leave port without something tying the boats down. If you haven't been there its hard to imagine how much even a middle size ship will move around even in a modeate sea.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:57 AM

GMorrison

Here's a picture of Mikasa. She was built in England as well, about 10 years earlier.

I don't see anything like lashings over the boats. They are sitting in really deep cradles.

It reminds me that on these pre-dreads, the boats typically were handled by large cranes braced to the masts, not davits.

 

 

Apparently the Nelson used both methods.  There are a big bunch of boats, large and small- most are stored right under two big cranes.  But, there are more boats quite aways aft, and those are on davits.  Two are on the rear of the superstructure, and they are huge davits.  They add some interest to this vessel!

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, February 15, 2018 8:28 AM

Thank You ; Amphib .

   I forgot that they were called Gripes . I was after all Damage Control . Not Deck Force .

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