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Vietnam era boats and craft plans / drawings

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  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Vietnam era boats and craft plans / drawings
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 12:41 AM

This may not fit in the 'Fine scale' catagory but, I'm lookig to build a 1/6 scale LSSC or STAB. Anybody out there know of a source of drawings / plans etc. for such craft? I've already checked The Floating Drydock to no avail. Hull lines and frame shapes are really what I need, the rest is comparitively simple.

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 6:29 AM

Hi;

 Have you tried the Naval Institute Press? They might have what you are looking for. T.B.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 9:12 AM

Tanker - Builder

Hi;

 Have you tried the Naval Institute Press? They might have what you are looking for. T.B.

 

Been there, done that.  USNI & Navy boats and craft documentation have at best, line drawings plan view and external elevation.   Not what the OP is seeking  in way of lines.  

The Library of Congress' Historical American EngineeringRecord (HAER) has some plans for 'boats'.   I have not found much in the way of military-type boats    Much more for civilian types;  ferry's, tugs, drift boats, etc.   There are some jewels in there if you have the patience to search and don't go down too many rabbit holes   

For the OP to get line plans for type such as LSSC,  he may want to obtain a copy of the Dragon 1:35 scale model and take lines off of it in same manner as naval architects of old did when surveying captured ships

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 11:26 AM

Hi Ed !

    I was looking around and you may have the only logical course of action for him . T.B.

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 8:07 PM

Well, fortunately I do happen to have the Dragon model of the LSSC. I picked it up several years ago when I couldn't find a PBR kit to play with. How fortuitous!!! So, I guess I will break out the dividers, et al, and start measuring. The figures themselves shouldn't be a problem, though I'll have to take off my shoes for the conversions . . .!

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Sunday, November 24, 2019 12:15 PM

Since my investment thus far in time and money are still low, a change in course .  .  .  I've got some 50' PCF Swift Boat drawing on the way from The Floating Drydock. For something to entertain me through the winter, I'm thinking an R/C, 1:12 scale Mk1 Swift Boat. A search across the internet found potentially suitable weaponry, so we shall see. One thing I did find is that dispite the Mk1 or Mk2 designations, there was still a lot of retro-fitting across the different models. Thus, it's a bit of a free-for-all kinda of build.

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, November 24, 2019 4:22 PM

Hey !

 You do know that Monograms old Swift MK1 is still out there. I think it's 1/32

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Sunday, November 24, 2019 4:44 PM

Tanker - Builder

Hey !

 You do know that Monograms old Swift MK1 is still out there. I think it's 1/32

Nope -- it's 1/48 scale

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Sunday, November 24, 2019 7:12 PM

Which brings up a good point that I've never understood. Maybe someone out there can explain it to me, cuz it makes absolutely no sense at all .  .  .  Aircraft models are in 1:72, 1:48. and 1:32 scales. Military vehicles are in 1:35, and car kits are in 1:24 and 1:25.

Wouldn't it be much simpler to standardize the scales? It would definately make dioramas easier, as lots of civilian vehicles are used in military and para-military roles, and military and civilian vehicles are around military aircraft. Additionally, some military aircraft are converted to civilian roles.

I'm sorry, it just doesn't make sense to have so many 'just slightly different' scales used.

And besides all that, 1:25 and 1:35 are weird scales anyway!!! they are not standard or metric!!!

Just my opinion, don't mean to hurt anyones feelings, really.

 

  • Member since
    May 2010
Posted by amphib on Monday, November 25, 2019 5:37 AM

I can't explain 1/25 scale but I believe that 1/35 scale started with the major suppliers of lead soldiers. But then how do you explain a manufacturer of diecast truck models using a scale of 1/34?

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Monday, November 25, 2019 7:13 PM

You just have to wonder. Oh well, moving on.

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 1:37 PM

Thank You; 

 here I am old and grey and forgot that it is indeed 1/48, Shame on Me!

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 1:45 PM

Hi;

      In some ways I would agree with you. For instance,I have many 1/32 car kits. Neat little Jewels. This is a great scale for big rigs! I like boats in 1/48 ,1/87 and 1/160 ( Railroad Scales)

       I also prefer ships and planes in 1/144. They fit shelves better! 1/48 scale planes are okay for the smaller Aircraft. I have a 1/24 Airfix Stuka J.U.87 from Way back and it's a monster.

     A unification of scale would serve better to have a continuing line of subjects. Although many don't like 1/48 I will say the best Armor I have ever built were Bandai's Armor series. And they had full interiors as well! In 1/48!! 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, November 28, 2019 4:54 PM

HooYah Deep Sea
Aircraft models are in 1:72, 1:48. and 1:32 scales. Military vehicles are in 1:35, and car kits are in 1:24 and 1:25. Wouldn't it be much simpler to standardize the scales? It would definately make dioramas easier

It all goes back to dime stores, boxes, and units of measurement.

In English measurements, ther ewere a number of standardized scales typically in increments of an inch to the foot.  The notations changed over the years, but the scales were generally the same.

So, let us consider 1:48 scale.  We can also render that as 1 unit equals 48 units.  Another way to write that would be 1"  4'-0"; in more modern guise that's rendered as 1/4"=1'-0"

If we look at 1/72, 1 unit equals 72, or 1" = 6'-0" or 1/6"=1'-0--which is a hair odd, as most inch scales are not divided in sixths.  In ship building, there is 1/64, which is 3/16"=1'-0"--and rulers are graduated in sixteenths.

1:72 scale seems to have been an upscale of 1/144, or 1/12"=1'-0" (or 1"=12' in wargaming scales).

These small scales get the "classic" railroad scales of HO, ±1/87, and its cousing OO, ±1/43(ish)--railroad "scales" are based on some nominal width between rails representing the semi-standardized rail width of 4'-8 1/2" (based on the width of Roman carts--sorta).

Interesingly, there's an argument over whether 1/300 is a doubling of 1/700, or 1/700 was the halving of 1/350.  Given that before 1/350 settled in as the scale, there was 1/400, 1/500, and 1/600 about, and the 1/700 seem to have come out first, pantographing 1/700 moulds up (or usings the double-size moulds direct, makes more sense.  To mme, at least.

Now, not one of those much matches scales that are metric-suitable--1:48 is ok where 1mm = 48mm, despite being 2.54mm = 1.2192m, a ridiculous number to contemplate.

We owe, it is said, 1/35 to Tamiya, as that was the best size kit to stick motors into and a couple of C size batteries.  It certainly fit better with 54mm tall cast metal figures.  And was--sort of--suitable with 1/32 (aka 3/8"=1'-0") scale.

54mm works out to about 5'-8.5" tall at 1/32, at 1/35, about 1,890mm tall, or 6'-2"

Ands, strangely enough, what we see today is actually somewhat standardized.  In my lifetime we have also had 1/34, 1/43, 1/50, and 1/40 to contend with.  Those are mostly die-cast scales, and meant to fit standardized boxes for store shelves (and to make a constant scale within a single manufacturer).

In a more perfect world, perhaps the metric scale might have been 1/30, with 1/32 being the "english" equivalent.  3/8" scale is spiffy for scratch building as 1/32" (close enough to 0.030) pretty much is an inch to scale, and dimensions can be ginned up readily.

The 1/24 & 1/25 divide is cleanly english/metric, 1unit = 24units is 1/2"=1'-0" being well known, as was 1mm = 25mm.

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