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submarine models

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  • Member since
    July 2015
submarine models
Posted by ROY L FROST III on Saturday, February 15, 2020 10:33 AM

need to know if there are models of newer American subs out there. Maybe the Virginia class ones, grandson is going to serve on one and would like to build one for his mother my daughter. Thanks for your help

Tags: US Navy subs
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, February 15, 2020 11:08 AM

Yes, there are some Virginia Class kits available

https://www.scalemates.com/topics/topic.php?id=4774

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Saturday, February 15, 2020 11:25 AM

The only problem with the Hobby Boss kit is that the molded details on the sail need to be sanded flush with surface of the sail.  They are much too heavy.  For example, watertight doors do not protrude from the sides when they are closed.  Good luck!  Where is he stationed?

  • Member since
    July 2015
Posted by ROY L FROST III on Saturday, February 15, 2020 1:44 PM

just going in in May, but is going to sub school. Training in missle maint. and I assumed he would be assinged to a newer sub, probably wrong. I been a modeler for years not so much military, but have done a few tanks and planes. thanks for the info.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, February 15, 2020 3:16 PM

Los Angeles Class Attack boats still in service. Trident/Ohio Boomers too. Both types have kits in 1/350 as well.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, February 16, 2020 12:46 AM

This weekend I've been at a conference of a segment of California historians, the missions.

A presentation was given by a woman who is the Great great grandaughter of Mariano Vallejo. The end of her presentation had slides of a trip she took on SSBN 658 when she was a teenager.

A lot of good photos. She got to drive the boat, and her parents hosted the crew at the family ranch in Sonoma. 

 

 

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    July 2015
Posted by ROY L FROST III on Sunday, February 16, 2020 12:39 PM

thanks for all you guys information, will keep you abreast to what happenes in the future

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Sunday, February 16, 2020 1:25 PM

If your missle-man grandson specializes in sub-launched cruise missiles, then fairly all of the current SSN classes (few LosAngeles, Seawolf, Carter, and Virginia's) have them.   Four of the early Tridents have been converted to SSGN with 7-packs of cruise missiles inserted in the ballistic missile tubes.   

If he will specialize in Trident ballistic missiles then his model will be limited to the later Trident class.  The new Columbia class replacement for the Tridents is still a few years away.   

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 1:12 AM

To all USN Submarine modelers,  Micro-Mir has released a few new 1/350 Sub kits recently.  Their USS Albacore, USS Growler, and now a USS Parche (early ver.), are available.

The USS Parche(late ver.) with the 100 foot extension will be available around April. (Note that the Parche Special Project model will have the "Gondola" interpretation per Hal Sutton's Covert Shores depiction.

   To all  SSBN builders and that missile-man grandson:  There is a very solid rumor that a 1/350 Resin kit of the Ethan Allen is going to be made.  As soon as I and a few friends get more details, I will post about it.

     Nino

 

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by lowfly on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 10:55 AM

I have built the hobby Boss USS Virginia kit. It isnt too bad. My god Son serves on board the USS New Mexico and the USS Virginia is her sister ship.  Few parts, easy assembly and good fit.  Decals were less than desired but not too bad

 

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  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 9:39 AM

Jim,

I just ordered the Golf II from Boris.  I did ask him again about the Ethan Allen model but he hasn't responded yet.

Bill

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Thursday, February 20, 2020 12:20 PM

Bill,

     His last drawings looked quite accepable.  Just hope he puts the Sail hatch only on the port side and makes it flush.  There are some interesting painting schemes for this class  from Red/Lt Gray/Black-variations to all Black (and slight variations for the deck).

   I understand many of the LA class have been getting refitted with additional "Gear"/Planes at the stern. probably easy scratch build to add but maybe some OEM's will add additional parts to the old kits like USS Greenville so that it can be used for other Boats as upgraded.

For those interested, the HB kit of Greenville has always been an inexpensive kit to buy and have fun with Mods and scratching.

   Jim.

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:39 AM

Jim,

I have been in touch with the Ethan Allen Reunion Committee about Boris' progress. They will be contacting him as well.

Just a work about the Micro-Mir kits; I like them.  They are the only source in injection-molded models for many, many different classes of boats from many different nations, some of which date back to the early 20th century.  They are a great source for submarine modelers!

Bill

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:58 PM

 Roy,

     I imagine you might want to wait to see what boat your grandson gets assigned to before buying, BUT, depending on your experience with Submarine models, you may want to try your hand at one now.

   Some current Plastic kits covering the latest classes of US Subs in 1/350 scale:

   HobbyBoss makes a Virginia Class

   Bronco makes a Seawolf Class

   Dragon make an Ohio SSBN class and the Florida SSGN

   Hobby Boss makes the Los Angeles Class

   HobbyBoss also makes a 3-in-1 LA class kit covering SSN-688/VLS/688I versions.

   Riich makes an LA class  flt I and flt II VLS and flt III Improved

     WarshipGuy brought up the Micro-Mir kits.  Very nice kits and lots of USN subs to choose from. In fact, Micro-Mir has more classes of US Subs in 1/350 than any other manufacturer.   Both Bill and I recommend them.  However, there are no alignment pins on their hull halves and this can be a tough situation for a modeler unless you have experience with it. Aligning the hull halves is The Most Important Step, otherwise you will be puttying,sanding, and scraping which can ruin the fun.  It's good to have some experience with PE too as many of the kits have brass props and some kits, like the Albacore, have tiny parts like Cleats to be attached to the deck.

   Once FreeTimeHobbies re-stocks, I recommend them for Micro-Mir.

   Several other online retailers also sell Micro-Mir like HobbyLinkJapan.

   My favorite Micro-Mir overseas-retailer is ModelsUA, a Ukraine online shop.  Good prices and even better stock than FreeTime.

One important thing... Micro-Mir does not currently have models of US Subs currently in service. Their USN kits cover the Cold War era Submarine classes: Growler, Nautilus, Albacore, Skipjack, Skate, Thresher, Sturgeon (short & long hull like Parche), George Washington, Lafayette, and Benjamin Franklin.  They do make several models in each class to cover differences within that class like the USS Daniel Webster, a Lafayette class.)

 Be aware that there are some accuracy issues on some of the Micro-Mir kits. For example, no vertical stabilizer on the stern diving planes on their Benj. Franklin class subs. Note that the other manufacturers kits are not always perfect either.

  Roy, Good luck to your Grandson.  I hope he makes his qualification quickly. Let us know where he gets assigned.

 

     Nino

 

P.S.  If you want a run-down on 1/700 kits or Resin models, just ask. 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Sunday, February 23, 2020 12:39 AM

And there is the big 1/144 Seawolf by Trumpeter.  It’s like a 1:1 whiffle bat!

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Sunday, February 23, 2020 1:12 PM

That big "whiffle-bat" of a model begs to have a motor. 

Glue the rudder to port and let'er run around the 15' pool this summer.  Keeps the critters out of the pool.

   Nino

P.S. If there is one area that Micro-Mir shines it's in their collection of 1/144 Submarine models.  Where else can you get the smaller subs like  Holland(British), Peral(Spanish), Piranha(Soviet), Resurgam(British), and Tiburon(Spanish).

  • Member since
    July 2015
Posted by ROY L FROST III on Thursday, August 27, 2020 8:07 PM

Nino, thanks for the information, sorry it took so long to get back. My grandson is graduating this fri., then going to Kings Bay Naval Base for his A school and staying there for his C school. Seems like he will be on a Ohio Class sub when all is done. I have been a builder for many years, like most of us, except mine is mostly auto, sports cars and the like. I have done a few military models, no ships or subs, but I'am sure I can  do it. So thanks for everything and will probably be in contact with questions

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, August 29, 2020 3:37 PM

Submarines are often tricky subjects to model well.

After about 1944, they become very featureless things, with little but the odd lump, bump, or fairing to break up the ines.

They are often painted featurlessly, too.  Most of the decals provided were only every used for launching & builder's trials, abd are painted over in actual service.

Which can include red "bottom paint," too.

For 2¢ let me recommend getting a sub kit that interests you, and build that, to get a feel for the process.  And, to consider things like how to mount/display it when finished.

A 1/350 sub kit can have as many as 50 parts in it (some are under 2 dozen), which puts a lot of impetus on getting each and every one exactly right.  Some of those kits have the hull in 4, or even, six parts--which is tough sledding for alignment.  Building up bulkheads to hold the shape, adding tabs to align the pieces, and the like.

You want to be on your games for a presentation piece.

Had a submariner in my last wardroom, he had a nice presentation display--it was a 1/700 of his boat, this was on five tubular pedastals about 3/4 the hull depth tall set on a walnut plaque, with the hull offest for the presentation nameplate.  It was elegant and sleek--who ever made it was really skilled.

Just 2¢

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Saturday, August 29, 2020 6:31 PM

lowfly

My godson serves on board the USS New Mexico and the USS Virginia is her sister ship. 

I grew up in New Mexico. Until joined the Navy, I never saw a body of water deep enough to float a ship, much less a submarine! How the heck did a submarine get named after New Mexico!?

Bob

On the bench: Italeri 1/72 UH-34 Seahorse helicopter; Academy 1/72 F-86F Sabre; Revell S.S. Hope, being built as the hospital ship U.S.S. Repose, and a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, August 29, 2020 8:15 PM

The Navy's SSNs are being named for states, which of course means earlier ships of the same name were battleships.

The first USS New Mexico was BB-40, following the more famous BB-39 USS Arizona.

Her own history is a good one, and her bells are located in several places in your home state.

Naming a nuclear sub New Mexico does have a connection with Sandia Labs of course.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, August 29, 2020 8:38 PM

GMorrison

The Navy's SSNs are being named for states, which of course means earlier ships of the same name were battleships.

The first USS New Mexico was BB-40, following the more famous BB-39 USS Arizona.

Her own history is a good one, and her bells are located in several places in your home state.

Naming a nuclear sub New Mexico does have a connection with Sandia Labs of course.

 

Bill

 

SSBNs are named for states, starting with the Trident Class Boomers. For the Polaris and Poseidon Class boomers they were named after famous early American figures, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, etc. Before the Tridents and after the Battleships, nuclear guided missile cruisers were named for states. SSNs went from traditional sea creatures to US cities, the previous naming area of cruisers, with the Los Angeles Class.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, August 30, 2020 6:32 PM

And, those are generally only suggestions, not steadfast rules.  If DepNav wants or needs a name, that name wil lbe used.  USS Montana comes to mind, if built she would have been BB-67; SSN-794 is a Virginia Class.

But, Carlos' summary is accurate.

I remember the big stink when they announced the name of SSN-705 as USS Corpus Christi.  There had been a patrol boat that had hunted U-Boats in the Gulf of Mexico by the name, but, suddenly they did not want the nae attached to a "weapon of war."  So, SSN-705 is City of Corpus Christi.

Now, there was a MSC Helicopter Repair ship named USS Corpus Christi Bay.

Speaking of "dry land" ships, there was BB-32 USS Wyoming (also SSBN 742); Iowa, Nebraska, Idaho, Colorado, and even Utah.

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Monday, August 31, 2020 12:16 PM

A bunch of you may have already heard this, but the Navy and DOD have decided and now announced that ARIZONA and OKLAHOMA will again be used for ship names. In keeping with the earlier stated info, they will be used for new subs. As far as I know, it has not been promulgated which boats will get those names yet.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, August 31, 2020 2:18 PM

CapnMac82

And, those are generally only suggestions, not steadfast rules.  If DepNav wants or needs a name, that name wil lbe used.  USS Montana comes to mind, if built she would have been BB-67; SSN-794 is a Virginia Class.

But, Carlos' summary is accurate.

I remember the big stink when they announced the name of SSN-705 as USS Corpus Christi.  There had been a patrol boat that had hunted U-Boats in the Gulf of Mexico by the name, but, suddenly they did not want the nae attached to a "weapon of war."  So, SSN-705 is City of Corpus Christi.

Now, there was a MSC Helicopter Repair ship named USS Corpus Christi Bay.

Speaking of "dry land" ships, there was BB-32 USS Wyoming (also SSBN 742); Iowa, Nebraska, Idaho, Colorado, and even Utah.

 

 

 

My understanding from the Corpus Christi naming was it being the catholic church being upset over the naming, not the city. The words literally mean, “body of Christ”. So I can understand their perspective. Adding the prefix “city of” was a reasonable trade off. Of course when the sub hunter was named, the Church was not so “activist” overall to any national government in nature compared to when the sub was named.

As far as the guidelines/traditions being used to name USN vessels currently, well I won’t get to into it. But let’s just say the previous tradition of naming destroyers and frigate type ships after naval service heroes has become a joke.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Monday, August 31, 2020 6:41 PM

Thanks to all for clarifying my question about the naming of submarines. When I think about it, it's not at all surprising that New Mexico has been the namesake of U.S. Navy ships.

Bob

On the bench: Italeri 1/72 UH-34 Seahorse helicopter; Academy 1/72 F-86F Sabre; Revell S.S. Hope, being built as the hospital ship U.S.S. Repose, and a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962.

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Monday, August 31, 2020 8:45 PM

   The DOD should just call everything "The Boat" save all the PC and other stuff.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 8:21 AM

HiArmornut!

 Nah, Let's just call them all " Floaty Thingies"

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