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Building Revell 1:72 Pirate ship

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  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Building Revell 1:72 Pirate ship
Posted by Having-fun on Thursday, April 23, 2020 8:56 PM

Atrtached is a couple of pictures of the pirate ship under constroction, it also show my workbech not as neat.

Pirate ahip - 1

Here is another angle

Pirate ship - 2

Does avery one has dificulty building the rigging? Working with the small threads and attempting to tie them to places you can barely reach is troublesome.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, April 24, 2020 2:43 PM

Yes, rigging is a seperate skill different from all other model building tasks.  It takes practice, and you use the touch quickly if you are not constantly doing it.  If I finish a model and don't do another right away, it seems to take me forever to get the moves right again.  After about 30 minutes to an hour, I start getting the moves again, and the muscle memory kick in again.  However, for a first rigged kit. I recommend you realize that rigging is likely to take longer than the entire rest of the build.

First, take your time and learn patience.  Even today, after building sailing ship models for decades, If it has been awhile after the last rigged ship, I find, even after I recover my muscle memory, I cannot work on rigging for a protracted length of time.  Too much concentration and fine manipulation are required.  I never work more than an hour at a time.  Any longer and my concentration will falter and my hands shake.

Also the right tools are important.  I have two home-made tools I find essential. The first is a hook, about six inches long, made from a large, long needle like a chrochet or needlepoint needle, and cut the eye to make the needle.  A chrochet hook is also okay.  The other tool is a fork.  I use one of those large sowing needles and cut the eye in half making a fork.  Sometimes you need to push a thread between two lines close together, and that is where the fork comes in.  Other times you need to fish out a line from an inner region of the rigging, and the hook is what does this.  Vision aid is also a good idea- I use cheap readers from the dollar stores (now closed). I am glad I am in good shape for those.

Lastly you willl be tying thousands of knots.  A bit of pratice, tying twenty or thirty knots in a piece of thread before even starting on the rigging is a good idea.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, April 24, 2020 3:19 PM

Work from the inside out. Reaching through rigging to attach something is to be avoided.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Friday, April 24, 2020 6:28 PM

Having-fun
it also show my workbech not as neat.

Well, you always have to allow for Morrisson's Law--that there's never more than 2 square feet free no matter the size the size of the desk.

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Friday, April 24, 2020 8:38 PM

Well Don, you are so right!, It seems that the treads has magnetic property becuase they are always stiking to intems they are no supposed to stick to, I also having problems tying knots, if I do not put some glue on the knot, many of then simply would unravell.

I am beguining to do as you recomended and only work for 1 to 2 hours then take a long breack, and I also being praticing on how to be patient, and that for me is very dificult because I tend to be hiper. I will keep trying

Bill, I do try to work from the inside out, but, at times I find that the instructuion tells me otherwise, today I was trying to add a front sail and it took me about an hour just to tied and secure the 4 treads that support the sail and the reason was becuase of the location of the tye in ports being in a crowded location.

 

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Friday, April 24, 2020 8:40 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Having-fun
it also show my workbech not as neat.

 

Well, you always have to allow for Morrisson's Law--that there's never more than 2 square feet free no matter the size the size of the desk.

 

 

My present workbeach is basically a 2 x 4 piece of wood, I just need to convince the The Boss ( the wife) to see is I can increase the size to something like 3 x 8. In case you are wondering, my workbench is located in the warehouse that we call a garage.

  • Member since
    July 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Saturday, April 25, 2020 12:16 AM

First off, you model is looking good so far, nice and neat. Keep it up and you’ll turn out one fine looking model.

All the advice so far is spot on. We all have different techniques but the basics really don’t change. Work for the inside out and do your standing rigging before your running rigging. 

I usually wax my lines with Bees Wax to keep it from fraying too much. I also start with the bow sprit but that‘s me. I also tend to work from the bottom up but I’ve seen beautiful models rigged from top to bottom.

I also try and do as much work off the model as possible and add lines I know will be needed to things like belaying pins before it gets really crowded. I add blocks to spars and masts before they’re glued onto the ship. Using a tiny bit of CA on your knots will usually hold them. Just remember' it’s like the old Brylcreem commercials, “a little dab will do ya.”

You’ll find your own style as you go so try not to get frustrated and the instructions are not always correct in terms of steps, so don’t be to rigid following them.

Hopefully some of this will help,

Steve

       

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, April 25, 2020 6:54 AM

Having-fun

Well Don, you are so right!, It seems that the treads has magnetic property becuase they are always stiking to intems they are no supposed to stick to, I also having problems tying knots, if I do not put some glue on the knot, many of then simply would unravell.

 

 

I should have added- it is almost impossible to cut a piece too long.  I always try to leave at least three to four inches extra in length so I have a longer end to work with- that should stop unraveling. I never regret having a piece too long (and having to spend more time working with it) but I sure do regret it when I cut it too short.

I cut the extra off and put a drop of thinned white glue on it for running rigging, a drop of black paint on black thread (standing rigging).  I may go back when it dries and trim it a bit closer with suture scissors.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Saturday, April 25, 2020 8:48 PM

"I cut the extra off and put a drop of thinned white glue on it for running rigging"

I have been using plastic cement on the knots, but, sometimes this makes a mess due to the cement melting the plastic. You mentioned using thinned white glue, by this you mean Elmer's glue? and if so, what ration of glue and water do you use?

Thanks Don.

  • Member since
    March 2018
  • From: Chicago suburbs
Posted by Luvspinball on Saturday, April 25, 2020 9:39 PM

Elmer's and water.  Thin enough to soak into thread and lock it in place.  I have two old medicine bottles: one is 50:50, the other is a bit thicker at 70:30.  If you are using cotton thread or Syren rope, you can also get the rope to lie straight by wetting it and then hanging with a clothespin on the end and letting it dry overnight.    Takes the kinks out before you use it for rigging.  I hang about 8 to 10 pieces the day before.  And always pass over the beeswax 2 or 3 times before using.  Cuts down on the fuzz and dust collection.

For standing rigging, you can add a bit of black dye or black tempra (acryl) paint in the Elmer's mixture to darken it up.

Bob

 

Bob Frysztak

Luvspinball

Current builds:  Revell 1/96 USS Constitution; heirloom Lobster boat

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, April 26, 2020 6:35 AM

Having-fun

"I cut the extra off and put a drop of thinned white glue on it for running rigging"

I have been using plastic cement on the knots, but, sometimes this makes a mess due to the cement melting the plastic. You mentioned using thinned white glue, by this you mean Elmer's glue? and if so, what ration of glue and water do you use?

Thanks Don.

 

Yep, good old Elmers, 1:1 with water, applied with toothpick.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Sunday, April 26, 2020 6:48 PM

Thanks Dave, thanks Bob, I will set it up on a couple of empty bottles. Bee wax I do not have any, so I will try to order it from Amazon or other vendor.

Thanks again.

Joe

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 5:52 PM

Here are 2 more photos of the Pirate Ship, it is almost completed, then I will have to fix all the bugs etc.

A side view

Side view

 

Here is a photo of the front of the ship.

I know that the ship may be showing the fact that I am still a beguiner, but I am learning.

PD It looks like I will have to break out my micro lenses to get photos that are sharp, my present lens only focus to 1 feet, so if I get any closer it looses focus.

  • Member since
    September 2010
Posted by retdfeuerwehr on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 6:39 PM
Use spellcheck in your posts.
  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 7:25 PM

That's a nice build, sir. I look forward to the next one.

One ridiculous part of the kit, no reflection on the builder; is how the main mast is coaxial with the capstan... design by Disney I suppose.

For spell checking, one way to do it is to type your post in Word, spell check, and then paste into the forum. I do that with longer posts and WIPs like yours here because this forum has an annoying way of sending partial posts to the ether halfway through.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 8:45 PM

retdfeuerwehr
Use spellcheck in your posts.
 

As I was told when I asked, there is no spell checker on this system. I am the first one to agreed that I need a spell checker, one of my worst subjets when I was going throught school was spelling, so, if some one needs a spell checker system is me.

Gmorrison says that he types his posts in Microsoft word, spell check it, then copy and paste, I will investigate such procedure.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 2:30 PM

Having-fun

 

 

 

 

PD It looks like I will have to break out my micro lenses to get photos that are sharp, my present lens only focus to 1 feet, so if I get any closer it looses focus.

 

Do you have any control of exposure?  Is there any mode for closeups, like an icon with a flower?  Selecting a high aperture ratio/small aperture really helps for closeups.  Otherwise, yes a closeup or macro lens will do the job.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Thursday, April 30, 2020 2:19 PM

Don Stauffer

 

 
Having-fun

 

 

 

 

PD It looks like I will have to break out my micro lenses to get photos that are sharp, my present lens only focus to 1 feet, so if I get any closer it looses focus.

 

 

 

Do you have any control of exposure?  Is there any mode for closeups, like an icon with a flower?  Selecting a high aperture ratio/small aperture really helps for closeups.  Otherwise, yes a closeup or macro lens will do the job.

 

 

 

The camera I am using is a semi-profesional Nikon D7000, it has a 18 - 200mm zoom lens attached to it, and that may be the problem, this lens is very powefull, but it only focus to about 12 inches. I also have a 50mm fix lens, I think I will try it to see if I get better results, if not I will try to put some extenders on this lens to increase it magnification.

Yes, the camera has all kinds of special adjustments, I also need to find the correct setting, but, as you know, I will have to keep trying until the correct formula is found.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, May 1, 2020 1:34 PM

Having-fun

 

 
Don Stauffer

 

 
Having-fun

 

 

 

 

PD It looks like I will have to break out my micro lenses to get photos that are sharp, my present lens only focus to 1 feet, so if I get any closer it looses focus.

 

 

 

Do you have any control of exposure?  Is there any mode for closeups, like an icon with a flower?  Selecting a high aperture ratio/small aperture really helps for closeups.  Otherwise, yes a closeup or macro lens will do the job.

 

 

 

 

 

The camera I am using is a semi-profesional Nikon D7000, it has a 18 - 200mm zoom lens attached to it, and that may be the problem, this lens is very powefull, but it only focus to about 12 inches. I also have a 50mm fix lens, I think I will try it to see if I get better results, if not I will try to put some extenders on this lens to increase it magnification.

Yes, the camera has all kinds of special adjustments, I also need to find the correct setting, but, as you know, I will have to keep trying until the correct formula is found.

 

Go to aperture priorty exposure.  Select f/16.  You'll need a tripod, but most people find they need a tripod anyway for closeup model photography.  I bought mine for about twenty bucks a few years ago at Walmart.  Also, exposure will probably be about 2-3 seconds indoors, so using the timer delay eliminates shake from pushing the button.  I take all my model pictures with an old Nikon D50x, have a later model Nikon for the rest of my photography.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Saturday, May 2, 2020 5:46 PM

 

Here is a closeup of the rear of the ship. I believed that the boat was completed, however, after seeing this photo I realized that I still have a lot of work to do.

 

Took the photo using a 50mm lens with an aperture of 22 and with a small micro tube.

 

The ship has some bad cracks on it as it can be seem in the photo, I just ordered the Tamiya putty recommended by you guys and also a set of very fine brushes so I can work on the details.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, May 2, 2020 5:49 PM

I like it. You could also just cover those gaps up with additional detail. It is after all a complete fantasy.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Saturday, May 2, 2020 8:14 PM

GMorrison

I like it. You could also just cover those gaps up with additional detail. It is after all a complete fantasy.

 

You have a point there, maybe I could add some fancy columns or something.

Thanks

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 3, 2020 8:51 AM

Having-fun

 

Here is a closeup of the rear of the ship. I believed that the boat was completed, however, after seeing this photo I realized that I still have a lot of work to do.

 

Took the photo using a 50mm lens with an aperture of 22 and with a small micro tube.

 

The ship has some bad cracks on it as it can be seem in the photo, I just ordered the Tamiya putty recommended by you guys and also a set of very fine brushes so I can work on the details.

 

 

Looks very nice!  Good brush work.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Co.Kerry, Ireland.
Posted by Est.1961 on Sunday, May 3, 2020 9:12 AM

Spell check or no spell check I like your handy work. 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: Cape Cod, Mass
Posted by Rick Sr on Sunday, May 3, 2020 4:03 PM

If you have a computer copy your clearest photos to it, enlarge and post.

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Sunday, May 3, 2020 8:46 PM

Rick Sr

If you have a computer copy your clearest photos to it, enlarge and post.

 

 

 

I did moved to my computer and enlarged it, that is when I noticed that my brush work needed more work. I did not have no.1 size brushes so I ordered some and I also ordered the putty to attempt to fill in the cracks, once all that work is done I will take more photos and post them in this forum.

 

Thanks

 

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 8:41 AM

Est.1961

Spell check or no spell check I like your handy work. 

 

 

Thank you, sir.

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 8:45 AM

GMorrison

That's a nice build, sir. I look forward to the next one.

One ridiculous part of the kit, no reflection on the builder; is how the main mast is coaxial with the capstan... design by Disney I suppose.

For spell checking, one way to do it is to type your post in Word, spell check, and then paste into the forum. I do that with longer posts and WIPs like yours here because this forum has an annoying way of sending partial posts to the ether halfway through.

 

 

 

Not been a nautical expert and not knowing the names of the different components of a ship, I do not understand your comments, could you kindly explain it, thanks.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 11:21 AM

 

This is all meant to be lighthearted criticism of the kit, not the modeler, nothing serious. The kit is a version of a kit brought out by a Russian modeling company named Zvezda named the Black Swan, which in turn was a renaming of their original Black Pearl kit.

The movie has happily left my brain, so I don't know for sure if the ship/ barge used had a co-axial capstan.

A capstan is a winch with a vertical axle.

It's used to do heavy lifting chores that require multiple man power. In the case above, it's being used to raise an anchor. It also gets used to operate a crane boom, lift heavy sails and similar jobs.

It rotates on a vertical axle that extends down several decks or even all the way down to the keel, so as not to get ripped from the deck.

The mainmast you are familiar with. It definitely extends all the way down to the keel.

So the two can't be in the same place at the same time.

Apologies for going on about it.

 

It's all for fun and your model looks great. Another similar but nicer model is the Revell Wasa.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 3:32 PM

 

Bill, I never took your comment as offensive, I simply wanted to know what your comment means. I am willing to take any constructive criticism of the work I am doing, because I believe that is the best way to learn, from some one that has been there and therefore is an expect.

Thanks

PD: if not an expect, at least someone who knows a lot more than I do. As an example, I am using your idea of running any typing through my Word speller.

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