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Yacht mary

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  • Member since
    January 2014
Yacht mary
Posted by Vett on Monday, August 31, 2020 6:27 PM

A simple question, what are those paddle like things on the sides of the yacht mary

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Monday, August 31, 2020 7:23 PM

Leeboards

mounted port & starboard, these allow the ship to sail straight when the wind direction is from the beam.   The board to the lee side (ie downwind) is lowered to provide sideways drag.   They function similarly to a deep keel or centerboard/daggerboard

  • Member since
    January 2014
Posted by Vett on Monday, August 31, 2020 7:26 PM

Thanks I thought they were for some kind of stableazation alway wondered

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, August 31, 2020 10:33 PM

no image.

Pretty typical back when on things like sailing barges which operate in shallow water and need a big open hold.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 5:42 PM

I want to reemmber the term-of-art is "bilge board."

As noted succintly above, they serve the same purpose as a dagger board or centerboard, to increase latteral resistance when sailing upwind.

Hanging the board off the wale means not having to cut into the keel structure for a box or slot for the board, which also leaves the hold clear.

They fell out of favor from several issues.  Like being larger than a center or dagger board of effective size, the complications of the pivot joint, and needing two of the things.  

Being on the lee rail, they could be complicated to work, as well.  Made of wood, they needed two tackles per each, a downhaul as well as an uphhaul.

Eventually, people realised you only needed to trunk a centerboard to just above the water line, and it only needed one tackle when made of metal, or metal clad wood.

  • Member since
    January 2014
Posted by Vett on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 5:49 PM

Thanks everyone for all the help, very interesting 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 6:16 PM

With all of the canal commerce, the design was popular with the Dutch. Mary in her turn was patterned on a Dutch design that the English King admired.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 5:17 PM

Sailing in canals boggles my sailing mind a bit.

keeping off the bank edges against a contrary wind, just rubs wrong somehow.

Which may well explain the goofy and strange sailing rigs seen on canal boats.

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 10:59 PM

Although favored by the Dutch in past years and no longer in common use, the leeboard has not entirely disappeared. The German owned two masted schoomner, JOHANNA, approaching Hamburg, Germany, still retains a relic of the past with her leeboard.

Photo submitted to Shipspotting.com by Eckhard Dhrbrock.

Happy modeling  Crackers

Anthony V. Santos

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 11:28 PM

I also recall a sailing dinghy or two with leeboards like the Sabot.

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

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