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Viking ship Mora

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  • Member since
    November 2009
Viking ship Mora
Posted by santa on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 2:49 PM

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by santa on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 2:50 PM

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by santa on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 2:51 PM

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by santa on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 2:53 PM

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 3:47 PM

Interesting! In a search for more about it, I found a FSM thread generally on the subject which is called "building a wood ship" and I have bumped it.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 11:24 PM

One thing is certain- it's not a viking ship. The box cover identifies it as a Norman Drakkar, and the name "Mora' is generally associated with William the Conqueror, although a read through of the other post I bumped will certainly offer a LOT more about that. And the date of the original is supposed to be "1066".

While I was a student in Denmark in 1978- 1979 I went to Bayeux to see the tapestry for myself. It is at the top of my list of manuscripts, or "pictoscripts" I suppose, about ships and medeival warfare.

If you ever see the old Nat Geo book about the Middle Ages, with the fold-out of the taspestry; either buy it or let me know. Truly remarkable.

The Norman ships are now understood to have no real relation to the Celtic ones. They were longer and much 'beamier", as they could transport some number of horses.

Look at how the shields in the tapestry so closely match those of the model. That's a kit I would very much like to have.

Bill ("William")

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, April 1, 2021 9:15 AM

GMorrison

One thing is certain- it's not a viking ship. The box cover identifies it as a Norman Drakkar, and the name "Mora' is generally associated with William the Conqueror, although a read through of the other post I bumped will certainly offer a LOT more about that. And the date of the original is supposed to be "1066".

While I was a student in Denmark in 1978- 1979 I went to Bayeux to see the tapestry for myself. It is at the top of my list of manuscripts, or "pictoscripts" I suppose, about ships and medeival warfare.

If you ever see the old Nat Geo book about the Middle Ages, with the fold-out of the taspestry; either buy it or let me know. Truly remarkable.

The Norman ships are now understood to have no real relation to the Celtic ones. They were longer and much 'beamier", as they could transport some number of horses.

 

Look at how the shields in the tapestry so closely match those of the model. That's a kit I would very much like to have.

Bill ("William")

 

 

Weren't the Normans descendents of the vikings?

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, April 1, 2021 10:51 PM

Don Stauffer
Weren't the Normans descendents of the vikings?

Yes, and also the Franks and the Franko-Romans. The Norse gave their name to Normandy, but had largely been fought off by the late 9th Century.

In the early 11th Century, at the time of the Norman conquest of England; the Normans had converted from the Norse religions to Catholicism. 

The Normans had spread their sphere of influence south to the Mediterranean area by 1017. They were a main force in the Crusades in the 11th Century.

Compared to the Norse raiders of two centuries before, the Normans were a culture that gave birth to Gothic era architecture, city development and commerce by sea in northern Europe.

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, April 1, 2021 10:56 PM

Santa presents a fine model in the making of a subject we see very little of. if you look carefully at the panels of the tapestry with the sea invasion of England; little horse heads appear over the sides of the ships.

I won't hijack this great thread, but I'm tempted to start a thread about the Bayeux Tapestry and the ships depicted.

Look forward to progress, Santa.

 

bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

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