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X-20 Dyna-Soar

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  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
X-20 Dyna-Soar
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 3:31 PM

I'm building this for the Boeing group build. I'll post my progress here as well.

It's a very well done resin kit with white metal parts.

 

 

 

The cockpit top fit is very bad. I envision much sanding/filling

One of the vertical stabs came broken. It was an easy fix

 

 

I cleaned up the surface and layed down a light coat of primer to see where I stand.

 

 

 

 

Things are not bad. I only had 5 small pinholes to fill. The wing leading edge needed

some work.

 

The instrument panel detail is very soft, but it kind of matches one of the proposed

layouts.

 

 

 

 

sig

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 4:21 PM

I filled the few pinholes, sanded, and reprimed. Things are looking not too bad.

I placed the instrument panel and seat in just to see how everything fits.

 

 

sig

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 4:26 PM

Thats cool, but what a pig! You should fill those horrible "Airfix" trenches.

Following with interest.

  • Member since
    August, 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 6:00 PM

GMorrison

  You should fill those horrible "Airfix" trenches.

 

 

Maybe the're part of the hi temp recovery system   oops time for my meds

 

Seriously; this looks to be a great start to an  unusual Boeing project. wil be following along with interest.

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 7:09 PM

Collect-Aire!  Love the caramel colored resin and "quality" casting.  Great subject though, and one we don't see enough of.

I had read that the X-20 was to have used "shingles" for thermal protection.  I believe the idea was that the shingles could expand and contract independently, thus placing no stress on the airframe.  Unlike the space shuttle's ceramic tiles, the shingles were metal (Inconel X?) and intended to be durable and reuseable.  The concept was allegedly ground tested with some success.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 7:15 PM

Thanks guys. The panel lines are WAY out of scale, but when its painted black I'm hoping they will be less pronounced.

On an interesting note, the X-20 did have an active thermal protection system. Water was

run below the skin and vented overboard during reentry.

sig

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, August 20, 2015 9:19 AM

Very cool! 

Makes me sad we didn't follow up with more work on a space-plane like this though. 

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, August 21, 2015 9:02 AM

Ah, that brings back memories. I worked on MOL (AF's Manned Orbiting Laboratory) that would have been served by X-20.  The later got canned first (MOL to be served by modified Gemini) and then the MOL got chopped.  Budgets were tough even in those days.

Have to see if I can find that X-20 kit

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 8:35 PM

A little progress.

 

 

sig

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Thursday, August 27, 2015 3:09 PM

The cockpit top fit is getting better

 

 

Primed

 

First coat of black

 

sig

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, August 27, 2015 7:05 PM

Looking good Mach71!

And wow that's awesome Don.

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, September 04, 2015 5:47 PM

Don, thats very cool that you worked on the MOL. Imagine where we would be spacewise

If we had continued with the X-20 and the MOL!

 

Whats not cool is I managed to mar the black paint is a couple of spots. I sanded and

repainted.

 

It's VERY black and very shiny! and very hard to get a good photo.

 

sig

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, September 18, 2015 11:32 AM

I had a decal setback, but all is well now. I got them on today.

 

 

sig

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Monday, September 28, 2015 3:38 PM

I think I'm going to call this done.

 

 

sig

  • Member since
    April, 2008
  • From: N.H. USA
Posted by TZombie on Monday, September 28, 2015 5:47 PM

Great looking build and it looks like you have part of my book collection behind it! ha ha.....

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: Northeast Florida
Posted by Arved on Tuesday, September 29, 2015 8:49 AM

Very nice model!

Real G
I had read that the X-20 was to have used "shingles" for thermal protection. I believe the idea was that the shingles could expand and contract independently, thus placing no stress on the airframe. Unlike the space shuttle's ceramic tiles, the shingles were metal (Inconel X?) and intended to be durable and reuseable.

If Wikipedia is to beleived:

"The framework of the craft was to be made from the René 41 super alloy, as were the upper surface panels. The bottom surface was to be made from molybdenum sheets placed over insulated René 41, while the nose-cone was to be made from graphite with zirconia rods.[20]"

That sounds absolutely futuristic for 1957.

“'It was a hot-temperature structure using a nickel super alloy,' said Hallion. 'The leading edges of the wing would be made of an even more exotic alloy. There was provision for active cooling.'” - X-20 Dyna-Soar Spaceplace Was Decades Ahead of Its Time

 

- Arved

e-mail | Blog

"Simplicate and Add Lightness" — design philosophy of Ed Heinemann, Douglas Aircraft

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Tuesday, September 29, 2015 11:21 AM

Yes, the X-20 was to have an active water cooling system. A tank was to supply water to below the hottest surfaces and the steam vented overboard during re-entry.

 

It was a very advanced design. For 1957 or even today.

sig

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, September 29, 2015 11:30 AM

Very cool, great to see her finished! I love seeing a not so great limited run resin kit built up by someone who knows what he's doing into a beautiful model. 

PS: My only complaint is you need more Poul Anderson on your reading shelf... Wink

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Tuesday, September 29, 2015 12:59 PM

Thanks!

 

Thats only a small section of my science fiction library. But I agree, I need more Poul Anderson.

sig

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