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Hiw do I remove a static charge on a model?

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  • Member since
    May, 2013
Hiw do I remove a static charge on a model?
Posted by Grantb1780a on Sunday, May 05, 2013 10:22 PM

I'm working on a new model  and  it  has a really bad static charge built up on it.  It's attracting all kinds of little particles, hair and even glue is pulled off a toothpick when I get near it.  How do I get rid of the charge so this doesn't happen?

Thanks

Tags: static
  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Cameron, Texas
Posted by Texgunner on Monday, May 06, 2013 10:17 AM

Well, Grant, this is what I use, but I've had mine for 35 years Surprise!  I was a bit surprised at their price in the 21st Century.  That said, they do have uses other than scale-modeling, ie. removing static from vinyl photograph records (what is that?  lol) or even getting rid of static "cling" on clothes.

http://www.turntableneedles.com/Zerostat-3-Antistatic-Gun_p_3822.html

Gary


"All you mugs need to get busy building, and post pics!"

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, May 06, 2013 10:20 AM

I have never come across this problem. Is this caused by the climate where you live. Very odd one this.

 ''I am a Norfolk man, and I glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Pz II Ausf F

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Lowell City, Mars
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Monday, May 06, 2013 1:31 PM

I've had that problem here in Colorado, where the humidity is usually very low.  I've had to stop using the Touch 'N Flow applicator, because the static charge pulls the glue off course in mid air, and it hits the model in the wrong place, leaving a nice blemish where you don't want one.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 9:32 AM

Here in Minnesota in the winter it gets extremely dry and static can be a big problem.  I have friends that spray a fine mist of water from a spray bottle before they sit down at their workbench.  They just mist the water up into the air in the workshop area.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 11:10 AM

" I have friends that spray a fine mist of water from a spray bottle before they sit down at their workbench.  They just mist the water up into the air in the workshop area."

Good tip above.

I've not had that problem, try, a Computer Stat-mat? In the UK, they are connected by a plug with only the earth connected, but check your local regulations.

Other than that, I usually wash with water, with a little washing up liquid, rinse & allow to dry, before painting, to get rid of dust, etc.

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Lowell City, Mars
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 1:36 PM

When my work involved handling electronic components or circuit boards with sensitve integrated circuits, we had conductive fabric grounding straps that we  buckled around our wrists and connected them to a good earth ground with a wire and special plug.  This worked to protect the components from getting zapped.  I wonder if it would work with plastic models?  Unfortunately, I don't have one any more.  They were professionally  made for this purpose, I don't know if a home made version would be successful.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Tornado Alley
Posted by Echo139er on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 2:19 PM

Try a  dryer sheet.

fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Coatesville, Pa.
Posted by fox on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 9:20 PM

I used to use one of those static guns in the lab. Sometimes they worked and sometimes they didn't. We payed a lot more for them because they were considered "Specialty Lab Equipment".

Jim Captain

Photobucket Main WIP: Rebuild of Monogram 1/8 "Big Deuce" with 1/8 Pocher V-12 in rear - 10%

   On the Bench:   Revell 1/48 Ju 52/3m - 50%;  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 20% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Saturday, May 11, 2013 9:20 AM
Static discharge isn't too much of a problem in my region, so I may just be guessing at this...I use Poly S Plastic Prep to clean up bare plastic before primer coats and the label on the bottle indicates that it contains an anti-static agent.

While I was still sitting behind the bench as a jeweler, I had a manager who was rather fond of misting the carpet with liquid Downy fabric softner in a spray bottle to disappate the static charge in the carpet. It seemed to work fairly well, but it had to be repeated every other day. On the plus side, it made the shop smell nice.
  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Sunday, May 12, 2013 12:37 AM

Try setting the model on a sheet of brass.  it tends to draw off the static charge.

A  thin sheet of shim brass should work

And if you get paint on it you can easily wipe it down with thinner.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 12, 2013 11:11 AM

Keep in mind too that spraying something through a nozzle charges both the nozzle and the stuff coming through.  So even if you discharge the model or assembly before you start spraying, charge builds up while spraying :-(

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • From: Nampa, Idaho
Posted by jelliott523 on Sunday, November 09, 2014 2:45 PM

I also just encountered this problem.  I had applied a coat of primer to the fuselage and wings of an aircraft model a few weeks ago.  I had been working on fixing some small sink marks and gaps with filler and had done some wet sanding.  I went back and started to apply another primer coat static charge started pulling in all kinds of small bits out of the air and they stuck into the primer.  I have heard that dryer sheets work pretty well to wipe down a model before painting to remove this static charge.  Like Don mentioned and a few others, I live in Idaho and in the Winter it becomes quite dry and static tends to build up on everything.

On the Bench:  Lots of unfinished projects!  Smile

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, November 09, 2014 4:38 PM

Well 2 things you can do.

1 - stop rubbing feet on carpets

2 - don't pet the cat.

LOL!

I agree with dryer sheets as well.

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • From: Nampa, Idaho
Posted by jelliott523 on Sunday, November 09, 2014 5:03 PM

I'll have to remember to not touch the cat before working on a model!  LOL!

At least I have not pet the cat and rubbed my feet on the carpet at the same time, might end up with fried cat!.

On the Bench:  Lots of unfinished projects!  Smile

  • Member since
    April, 2017
Posted by Cracker Jack on Thursday, April 20, 2017 11:46 AM

Well, I ain't no Alferd E. Einstein but I'm bettin' that wrapping the piece in aluminum foil and touching it to a faucet (if you have copper plumbing) would get the job done.  I think the next time I spray something I'll paint it on aluminum foil grounded to a faucet and I'll ground the nozzle of my airbrush to the aluminum foil.  I might look like Sheldon Cooper with an alligator clip and wire on my airbrush but it might work.  However, I may be fixin' something that ain't broke. 

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