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Nose weights for airplanes (buckshot and epoxy)

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  • Member since
    March, 2015
Nose weights for airplanes (buckshot and epoxy)
Posted by JohnnyK on Tuesday, January 03, 2017 1:03 PM

I will soon be starting Revell's 1/48 scale B-29. I know that this model needs a lot of weight in the nose to prevent tail sitting. I would also like to add weight to the engine mounts. I was thinking of mixing lead buckshot and epoxy and then press the mixture into the curved engine mount. Has anyone done this in the past?

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Clearwater, FL
Posted by Gymbo-59 on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 12:09 PM

Don't do what I did.  When I first got back into modeling 20 years ago, I had to add weight to a plane I was building.  I  mixed bb's w/ some of that tube glue and packed it in the nose of the plane. The next day I had a very droopy and melted nose.  I didn't realize at the time how "hot" tube glue is.  I'm not sure of the chemitry of the epoxy your using or if it is hot or not.

Duct tape is like the force.  It has a dark side & light side and it holds the universe together.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 12:30 PM

You'll be fine with epoxy.

I use pennies quite often, for weight. In the long run, probably the cheapest option too! They also fit most nacelles.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 12:35 PM

Gymbo-59

Don't do what I did.  When I first got back into modeling 20 years ago, I had to add weight to a plane I was building.  I  mixed bb's w/ some of that tube glue and packed it in the nose of the plane. The next day I had a very droopy and melted nose.  I didn't realize at the time how "hot" tube glue is.  I'm not sure of the chemitry of the epoxy your using or if it is hot or not.

Ouch, tube glue tends to soften plastic. The plastic can remain soft for days afterward.

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 12:40 PM

fermis

You'll be fine with epoxy.

I use pennies quite often, for weight. In the long run, probably the cheapest option too! They also fit most nacelles.

 

There are a number of epoxy products that are designed for use on plastic. I am going to test the epoxy on some scrap before I use it on the B-29. I would hate to melt the wing.

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 1:35 PM

Hello JohnnyK!

You should be fine with epoxy, when it comes to solvents, although some of them might generate heat when curing, so trying it on scrap is a good idea.

Then again, maybe you could find some better place for the weight than the engine nacelles? You see the further forward you pack the weight the less weight you need and the less load you put on the main gear. If you load the nacelles, you'll add a lot of weight without affecting the CG much, but almost all of that load will put additional strain on the landing gear - so maybe it's worth it to consider some spaces closer to the nose of the machine?

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 1:55 PM

This is what I use...

 

I don't normally use it for weights. But I do use it to epoxy nuts in ship hulls(for mounting)

I can then build the model and mount it later...

Regardless of the purpose...I have had no issues with the exopy reacting in any way with the plastic.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Clearwater, FL
Posted by Gymbo-59 on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 6:07 PM

JohnnyK

 

 
Gymbo-59

Don't do what I did.  When I first got back into modeling 20 years ago, I had to add weight to a plane I was building.  I  mixed bb's w/ some of that tube glue and packed it in the nose of the plane. The next day I had a very droopy and melted nose.  I didn't realize at the time how "hot" tube glue is.  I'm not sure of the chemitry of the epoxy your using or if it is hot or not.

 

 

Ouch, tube glue tends to soften plastic. The plastic can remain soft for days afterward.

 

I really wish I took a picture.  It was all schriveled(sp?) & sagging downward.  No pun intended. Oh well, live & learn.

 

Duct tape is like the force.  It has a dark side & light side and it holds the universe together.

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 8:59 PM

Try using epoxy putty.  I use Millliput with birdshot, but you can use hardware epoxy ribbon as it's cheaper.  The epoxy putty/lead shot mix is firmer than liquid epoxy, so you don't have to worry about the epoxy seeping where you don't want it.

It is always a good idea to place the weight as far forward as possible, to reduce the amount of weight required, and thus lessening the stress on the main gear (NOT the nose gear).  The B-29 has a lot of spaces up front, so fill those areas first before loading up the nacelles.  Don't neglect areas like the spaces on either side of the nose gear well, under the cockpit floor.  Even the crew compartment behind the pilots - nobody is going to see in there anyway!

When I built Monogram's B-29 around 1980, I used several dead "D" cell batteries held in place with plasticene.  But kids don't do that, as I had a couple leak after they went into some unfortunate models!  The B-29 main gear was plenty strong and I never had any structural problems, so no need to buy metal gear.

I killed an Airfix C-130 around the same time using solvent type putty to hold (again!) dead batteries.  The fuselage was soft for months!  Such a stupid mistake!  At least the Bloodhound missile and launcher that came with the Herk was succsessfully built.

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Lowell City, Mars
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 9:33 PM

BB's and white glue has always worked for me.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 10:01 PM

Everyone,

thanks for the suggestions, except for the "D" batteriesWink

John

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, January 05, 2017 9:06 AM

Don't put them in engine nacelles.  You need a long lever arm as well as weight.  Nacelles are usually not that far (longitudinally) from the main gear.  Nose is usually much farther away from main gear.  Effect of weight is weight x lever arm.  A spot four inches from main gear will have four times the effect as the same wieght placed only an inch from main gear.

Either epoxy or CA will work- I use gel CA with things like bbs that have irregular shape and poor packing factor.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, January 05, 2017 11:35 AM

Don Stauffer

Don't put them in engine nacelles.  You need a long lever arm as well as weight.  Nacelles are usually not that far (longitudinally) from the main gear.  Nose is usually much farther away from main gear.  Effect of weight is weight x lever arm.  A spot four inches from main gear will have four times the effect as the same wieght placed only an inch from main gear.

Either epoxy or CA will work- I use gel CA with things like bbs that have irregular shape and poor packing factor.

 

Bob,

 

Are you an engineer or an architect? I am a retired architect. Usually only thgose type of people would use tne term "weight x lever arm". I agree with yoiu about weight location. I am going to start with putting weight as far from the main gear as possible. Just in case that is not enough I will need to put weight in the nacelles.

Thanks for the suggestions.

 

John

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, January 06, 2017 10:35 AM

JohnnyK

 

 
Don Stauffer

Don't put them in engine nacelles.  You need a long lever arm as well as weight.  Nacelles are usually not that far (longitudinally) from the main gear.  Nose is usually much farther away from main gear.  Effect of weight is weight x lever arm.  A spot four inches from main gear will have four times the effect as the same wieght placed only an inch from main gear.

Either epoxy or CA will work- I use gel CA with things like bbs that have irregular shape and poor packing factor.

 

 

 

Bob,

 

Are you an engineer or an architect? I am a retired architect. Usually only thgose type of people would use tne term "weight x lever arm". I agree with yoiu about weight location. I am going to start with putting weight as far from the main gear as possible. Just in case that is not enough I will need to put weight in the nacelles.

Thanks for the suggestions.

 

John

 

Engineer/physicist.  Started designing my own flying model airplanes when I was in high school, went on to career in aerospace industry.  Background helped a lot with flying models, but Minnesota not good location for flying models, so everything is static scale now (getting too old to chase them, anyways, these days).

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Saturday, January 07, 2017 2:42 PM

Good Point , Fermis !

 Plus the fact they are pennies they can be bent to shape and cut up as well .Gee , I hope the Feds don't read this . I also flatten them with a heavy hammer and bend them to fit .

 The same holds true for B.Bs

 The other item that works for me When I have them , is two or three washers held together with a super rare earth magnet . Those little scudders are heavier than they look ! Remember , the washers can be cut or bent to fit  as well .

 Now for a B-29 that big , I would probably use Birdshot , Poured into an area that would be solid behind the Bombardier and over the nose gear .The space under the cockpit will work here .  Tanker - Builder P.S. The personnel tunnel can be used too , as long as it's the area directly connected to the cockpit area .

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, January 08, 2017 11:44 AM

I get a fly tying catalog that I use for finding very thin thread (for ship and biplane rigging).  I see in the latest catalog a tungsten putty.  Anyone ever use that?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, January 08, 2017 1:06 PM

I use 1/2" steel nuts and bolts. I can put three nuts on a 1 1/2" bolt and it weighs a LOT. 

Not a fan of working with or distributing lead.

As Don said, moment arm is everything.

(semi-retired architect)

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Sunday, January 08, 2017 2:05 PM

GMorrison

As Don said, moment arm is everything.

(semi-retired architect)

 

Ditto

(Pilot)

 

Stick out tongue

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, January 08, 2017 2:26 PM

GMorrison

I use 1/2" steel nuts and bolts. I can put three nuts on a 1 1/2" bolt and it weighs a LOT. 

Not a fan of working with or distributing lead.

As Don said, moment arm is everything.

(semi-retired architect)

 

As Archimedes said: “Give me a place to stand and with a lever I will move the whole world.”

Now getting back to nose weights, I'll see if nuts and bolts fits into the nose of the B-29.

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Tucson, AZ
Posted by Archangel Shooter on Monday, January 09, 2017 11:43 AM

 

 Your image is loading...

 On the bench: Trumpeter Ticongeroga

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, January 09, 2017 12:47 PM

Now, that's a great photo. Big Smile

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, January 09, 2017 12:55 PM

I am working on a Hasegawa F-86. The instructions include a recommended amount of weight in the nose. I wish all kits would include this information.

I used weights that are made for Pine Wood Derby cars. The weights are not lead. I put some weight in front of the cockpit and some additiional weight on both sides of the cockpit.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, January 11, 2017 12:57 PM

You Know  JohnnyK;

 I should've mentioned those as I use them a lot too .Just plain forgot about them . The B-58 photo made me think of something I hadn't thought of for years . At Little Rock Airmotive we had to put weights on the Falcon 20 noses or they would tail-sit ! T.B.

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • From: Nampa, Idaho
Posted by jelliott523 on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 9:32 AM

Don Stauffer

I get a fly tying catalog that I use for finding very thin thread (for ship and biplane rigging).  I see in the latest catalog a tungsten putty.  Anyone ever use that?

 

Don, I myself have not used that type of product, but was wondering the same thing. Uschi has a similar product available called 3-Green putty, not sure which way is cheaper. I also have seen that Deluxe Materials has a product called Liquid Gravity, small (looks like lead shot) beads that you can mix with epoxy, CA, or white glue to fill in small areas. I would think that if using a product like small bird shot, it would be cheaper to purchase from a reloading store and you'd have enough to last a lifetime of builds.

On the Bench:  Lots of unfinished projects!  Smile

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