SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Cutting Panels

284 views
11 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June, 2016
Cutting Panels
Posted by David from PA on Saturday, March 18, 2017 2:23 PM

I need to know a good way to cut panels to expose engines, tubes, wires, etc. on aircraft without losing panel width or height. Can anyone give me suggestions? Thanks

David From PA

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Saturday, March 18, 2017 2:44 PM

My process has always been to use Dymo label tape to outline the panel I  want to remove and then use a scriber to cut it free. If the job is delicate, a sewing needle chucked in my pin vice is used to scribe it. If any height or width is lost on the panel, a little strip styrene gets glued to the edge. The whole panel gets sanded down for scale thickness anyhow, so blending repairs isn't a major issue. The new opening where the panel was located is dressed with a file and sanded smooth. If needed, strips of stock can be glued in place to represent the frame the panel rests upon. 

  • Member since
    June, 2016
Posted by David from PA on Sunday, March 19, 2017 7:09 AM

Let me get this right.... I cut the panel out then thin it down by sanding and also thin the area where I took the panel out and use stip styrene to replicate a frame?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David From PA

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, March 19, 2017 11:09 AM

Those new saws with photo etched blades make very thin kerfs so negligible panel dimension is lost- saves a lot of scribing/cutting.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Monday, March 20, 2017 7:19 AM

David from PA

Let me get this right.... I cut the panel out then thin it down by sanding and also thin the area where I took the panel out and use stip styrene to replicate a frame?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David from PA

Let me get this right.... I cut the panel out then thin it down by sanding and also thin the area where I took the panel out and use stip styrene to replicate a frame?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 No, thin the whole area ,from the inside,first then cut.....much easier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 12:16 PM

KnightTemplar5150

My process has always been to use Dymo label tape to outline the panel I  want to remove and then use a scriber to cut it free. If the job is delicate, a sewing needle chucked in my pin vice is used to scribe it. If any height or width is lost on the panel, a little strip styrene gets glued to the edge. The whole panel gets sanded down for scale thickness anyhow, so blending repairs isn't a major issue. The new opening where the panel was located is dressed with a file and sanded smooth. If needed, strips of stock can be glued in place to represent the frame the panel rests upon. 

 

 
I second this method, Dymo tape as the straight edge, and a fine sewing needle chucked into my pin vise.  I will also use a fine razor saw, this one, from CMK:
 
 
As Don mentioned, a really fine blade leaves very little kerf when cutting.
 
I do like KT describes above, too, replace material as necessary with styrene stock.  I first learned about all of this from reading Shep Paine's "Tips on Building Dioramas" in my Monogram kits when I was a kid.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 12:46 PM

Hi Dave :

 

    I probably do it the hard way to some . I thin the areas around an opening panel like looking through the surface of a light box . I shine a bright light on the outside of the plane or part . Then I thin the area from behind .

    Then I cut it out with a very fine flattened sewing needle sharpened  on an arkansas stone . It then takes very little work to come up with a panel needing no repairs or extra framing , unless it's there of course !    T.B.

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 8:06 PM

I use the back side of a new #11 blade to carefully make very light passes on the plastic. It will take a lot of light passes to cut thru. Depending on the panel, I will duplicate it with wine bottle foil so it looks like sheet metal in thickness. The foil is easy to tool and will easily copy any details by simply pressing it over the original part inprinting rivets or framing details. The surrounding area of the opening will be thinned down to scale.

As an example, I used wine bottle foil and pressed it on the gun hood cover of this 1/48 Dora then trimmed it to size. It produced a scale like thickness that looked better than the kit's thick part. Double click on the image for an extreme closeup.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 11:50 AM

plasticjunkie

I use the back side of a new #11 blade to carefully make very light passes on the plastic. It will take a lot of light passes to cut thru. Depending on the panel, I will duplicate it with wine bottle foil so it looks like sheet metal in thickness. The foil is easy to tool and will easily copy any details by simply pressing it over the original part inprinting rivets or framing details. The surrounding area of the opening will be thinned down to scale.

As an example, I used wine bottle foil and pressed it on the gun hood cover of this 1/48 Dora then trimmed it to size. It produced a scale like thickness that looked better than the kit's thick part. Double click on the image for an extreme closeup.

 

I use soda or beer can aluminum for making some loose panels, PJ.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 1:37 PM

plasticjunkie

I use the back side of a new #11 blade to carefully make very light passes on the plastic. It will take a lot of light passes to cut thru. Depending on the panel, I will duplicate it with wine bottle foil so it looks like sheet metal in thickness. The foil is easy to tool and will easily copy any details by simply pressing it over the original part inprinting rivets or framing details. The surrounding area of the opening will be thinned down to scale.

As an example, I used wine bottle foil and pressed it on the gun hood cover of this 1/48 Dora then trimmed it to size. It produced a scale like thickness that looked better than the kit's thick part. Double click on the image for an extreme closeup.

 

That's a cool idea PJ. Do you have to coat it with anything so it keeps it shape or does it hold up pretty good as long as you don't do anything to deform it? Seems like it would be very delicate.

-Andy

    

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:33 PM

Rooster

Yes it's very delicate but as long as it's not touched it will maintain it's shape. It's very easy to tool and looks scale.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 5:51 PM

Hi Baron ;

 I have done this also . Especially on boat hull cut-aways and the same with planes .  T.B.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER