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Acceptable gap

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  • Member since
    January, 2015
Acceptable gap
Posted by TheMongoose on Saturday, April 08, 2017 9:50 AM

I've attached a picture of what the gap looks like on my 1/32 Tamiya F-4E. I think it's too large but need your expert advice. In the past I would have glued this together and called it good but after looking at alot of other models I think it needs work. Let me know if I'm on the right track?

If it does need work how have you aproached it? I was thinking of trying to sand the curve of the fuselage into the bottom of the tail so it has a better shot of sitting down flush.

On the bench - 1/35 F-35A Lightning II, 1/72 Sptfire MkVb & for a change of pace a 1/700 USS New York

 

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, April 08, 2017 1:47 PM

How about a shim of strip styrene to fill that?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Saturday, April 08, 2017 1:58 PM
Is the bottom of the tail surface flat? If it's bulging or uneven side to side it'll cause a gap. Same with the mating surface on the fuselage. If both are even then Stik's idea is the way to go.
  • Member since
    October, 2010
Posted by hypertex on Saturday, April 08, 2017 9:18 PM

Don't sand the fuselage, unless it's shape is incorrect.

Strip styrene is what I would do. I would at the strip to the bottom of the stabilizer, then test fit. Add more strip if the gap is still too big, sand the strip if it is too much. Sand and test fit and sand again. You may have to sand/scrape the edge of the strip to be flush with the sides of the stabilizer. When you get a good fit, you can glue it in place.

To answer your first concern, I agree that it does need work.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Saturday, April 08, 2017 11:05 PM

ok, i started by taking the #11 to the bottom of the tail. It was flat and the fuselage was not. I have it down to this point now and I think this looks good...

 

There are 2 places I can see a little light through. I'll try some thin plasticard sheet in those areas to really clean it up.

On the bench - 1/35 F-35A Lightning II, 1/72 Sptfire MkVb & for a change of pace a 1/700 USS New York

 

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, April 09, 2017 12:42 AM

Much better! I take it that the entire vertical tail is a separate piece from the fuselage? If so, then yes, working the bottom of the fin to achieve a better fit is you best bet... file/sand, test fit, repeat as needed.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    June, 2016
Posted by Pwaszak on Sunday, May 14, 2017 12:03 AM

Can you guys explain to me how the 'strip styrene' technique works? I actually have the same problem, on the same plane (Although my is 1/72 scale.) I'm kind of a noob at this hobby (only been doing it a year), and I've heard of this texhnique a lot, but could never wrap my head around how to go about actually doing it. 

 

Thanks in advance!

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Sunday, May 14, 2017 8:04 AM
pm sent with styrene details.

On the bench - 1/35 F-35A Lightning II, 1/72 Sptfire MkVb & for a change of pace a 1/700 USS New York

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:59 AM

There are incredibly thin and narrow strips of styrene available at hobby shops, from Plastruct and Evergreen.  I think they make like .010 x .020 and up.  Those fit in some pretty fine cracks and will ease filling.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 14, 2017 11:02 AM

Just a thought- for using styrene strips, do you have an old feeler gauge, like we used to have to adjust auto distributor points in the days before electronic ignition?  You can use those to see what is the best thickess of strip you need to fit in the gap.  I always keep an assortment on hand, and just try various strips to find the best one to fill the crack.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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