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Won't try that again

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  • Member since
    June, 2017
Won't try that again
Posted by plane nuts on Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:01 PM

I am finishing up a Revell P-61 "night fighter" which is quite tail heavy.  This kit has easy access to the engine nacelles via the wheel well openings under the wings.  I decided to fill that area with split shot (fishing sinkers) and then fill the whole thing with white glue to hold them in place. I learned from a previous model not use typical model glue in large amounts, it makes the styrene quite soft and pressing the halves of the fuselage together leaves finger shaped indentationsSad.  Anyway,  I put the split shot and the glue in and hung the model from its tail for a couple of days.  Turns out that the white glue 1) is not as viscous as it looks and 2) takes forever to dry when you use large quantities of it.  After hanging nose-down for a couple of days, the glue managed to seep out through some tiny openings around the engines and completely filled the cowlings where it then set quite nicely.  If that was not enough, when I filled the wheel wells with paper towels prior to painting a couple of weeks later and set the plane on its wheels, the glue back-filled into the paper towels and so now there is a quite solid mass of paper in each wheel well.  Needles to say, this is a technique that I will not be repeating.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, August 17, 2017 2:18 PM

One of the reasons I like JB Weld's clear 5 minute epoxy for that kind of thing.

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Thursday, August 17, 2017 4:57 PM

As Lewis Grizzard (a great American and humorist) said many times:

 "Dang, buddy, I don't believe I'da told that!"

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by Marcus McBean on Thursday, August 17, 2017 7:33 PM

Thanks for the lesson and the laugh...sorry.

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Thursday, August 17, 2017 8:38 PM

You may still be able to save the plane. If it was "water clean up "type white glue. ( Elmers )

Find a dish, or bin big enough to hold the plane. Fil it with water and submerge the plane compleatly. Soak it until the glue softens. ( Dont know how long it will take. A week ? )

Once it softens you should be able to pull the "chunks " out. Then wash the exess glue off with liberal amounts of water.  Warm ... not quite hot.

YES  I know it's messy. But it will work. It's just going to take   f  o  r  e  v  e  r .

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, August 17, 2017 9:56 PM

Gel CA glue is the best way I've used to hold lead weights in place. Weights are best added during construction.

DO NOT USE Squadron Putty to fix weights in place... Don't ask...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Thursday, August 17, 2017 10:39 PM

Gel Ca is best, but don't spray accelerator! It will heat up when it activates and possibly damage the plastic.

  • Member since
    June, 2017
Posted by UnwaryPaladin on Friday, August 18, 2017 8:32 AM

Is it ok to use lead weights? I recall reading that some people had problems with the lead reacting to the plastic or glue.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, August 18, 2017 9:26 AM

I have had no problems over the past 30 years using lead birdshot. How you choose to fix your weights in place is usually where any problems come from.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Boston
Posted by Wilbur Wright on Friday, August 18, 2017 6:07 PM

I use Elmers Stix-All for this which is really just clear silicon caulking. Dries overnight and stays flexible.  It's very very sticky.  It's never failed me for weighting aircraft.

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Sunday, August 20, 2017 12:48 AM

 

 

That's an exellent suggestion! I will definately give that a try! Thanks!

 

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, August 20, 2017 2:16 PM

Wilbur Wright

I use Elmers Stix-All for this which is really just clear silicon caulking. Dries overnight and stays flexible.  It's very very sticky.  It's never failed me for weighting aircraft.

 

I have a question. Have you ever used that glue with split lead shot? I need to install a LOT OF WEIGHT into the nose of my B-29. I plan on installing the split lead shot balls behind the cockpit bulkhead.

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Thursday, August 24, 2017 11:13 PM

UnwaryPaladin

Is it ok to use lead weights? I recall reading that some people had problems with the lead reacting to the plastic or glue.

 

I'd used lead curtain weights in number of airplane kits trimmed to fit spaces closest to the model's nose as possible, never needed to glue them in. If several weights were needed taped them up best possible so wouldn't jiggle around. The Airfix B-29 needed a lot of them, placed them below the forward gun turret, one I'd built in 2005 still holding up just fine.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, August 25, 2017 9:59 AM

Note that catalyzed resins like epoxy and polyester generate considerable heat when they cure.  I once had a small paper drinking cup with epoxy resin on it, and it started smoking when it began to harden. It ended up charring the cup!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, August 25, 2017 10:33 AM

My method is very simple. I pack the area with lead sinkers then use rolled up masking tape (sticky side out) to trap the weights in place. The masking tape with the sticky side out keeps thing tightly in place.

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