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Best Non-Solvent Based Filler/Putty

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  • Member since
    July, 2017
Best Non-Solvent Based Filler/Putty
Posted by crazypat on Sunday, September 24, 2017 5:46 PM

what is the best non-solvent based filler/putty because i am allergic to solvent it gives me socking migranes so i use all acrylics. i have tried a few different things (including fine wall filler) but i get a grany finish. please i need help to get up to scratch.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Northern New Jersey
Posted by Tojo72 on Sunday, September 24, 2017 6:45 PM
I have not used it,but I have read good things about Perfect Plastic Putty,it's acrylic based.Google it and learn more,and where it could be bought.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by ecotec83 on Sunday, September 24, 2017 6:47 PM

Theres a few out there, have tried vallejo putty an absolutely hate the stuff. Perfect plastic putty is my go to filler now. Only downside is it dries almost too fast so you have to work quick.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, September 24, 2017 7:15 PM

I agree with Tojo and ecotec. PPP is worth a try, it might solve your problems.

I like the stuff. In addition to eco's comment that it dries very fast, it also cannot be wet-sanded.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Sunday, September 24, 2017 7:32 PM
thank you all very much i look up where i can buy it and give it a try thank you
  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by gobobbie on Sunday, September 24, 2017 9:04 PM
You might want to try your local hardware store for acrylic wall spackle. I have been experimenting with this stuff and so far its cheap, available locally, cleans with a dampened q tip, sands well. There is some shrinkage but the pluses outweigh that one negative. Bob Gregory Ruining one kit at a time
  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Sunday, September 24, 2017 10:39 PM
thank you i will give it a try. always open to new ideas and cheaper options
  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, September 25, 2017 4:28 AM

Hello!

Sorry to hear about your problem - it's a bad one, like being a diver who's allergic to water... About the best filler ever is liquid sprue, but that's mostly solvent with a little styrene added, soit's out of question here. You might try CA for minor holes, sometimes people add microbaloons or baking soda to build up the volume. Or, for really big holes stuff caled Milliput is really good - it's epoxy, you work it up with water, it has very good adhesion to styrene and dries nice and hard without shrink - very nice stuff, also good for sculpting.

Hope it helps, good luck with your modelling projects and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
Posted by damouav on Monday, September 25, 2017 6:43 AM

I have had excellent success using both Perfect Plastic Putty and CA as I use both lacquer based primer and top coats (MRP & Tamiya Lacquer Paints). I would lean towards using the CA as it sets rock hard (using excerlator) , easy to sand and it is quick. Just dont leave it sit un-sanded for long periods as you will fight to sand it back. CA can also be mixed with baby powder for larger filling jobs.

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  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Monday, September 25, 2017 7:05 AM

In a pinch when I was out of plastic filler, I tried Elmer's Carpenter's wood filler (the new stuff) it goes on purple in color then turns beige when dry. This stuff seems to be ok for models since it is low odor and water soluable and very fine in texture.  I sculpted a contured  large gap on a 1/48 F-111 and it's been holding well for a year now.

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Monday, September 25, 2017 5:30 PM

thanks heaps for the replys Pawel, damouav and Jay Jay. i will give your ideas a go and see what i like best and go from there. I does make it hard when you cant use most of the weathering stuff, glues, fillers and stuff like that. it is great to get some advice from the experts all of you who have helped me on this foum. one day hopfully i will become half as good as the rest of you. thanks again

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Northern New Jersey
Posted by Tojo72 on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 6:12 AM
I believe that Vallejo's weathering products are water based.Check them out.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • From: San Antonio, Texas
Posted by Marcus McBean on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 6:52 AM

Jay Jay

In a pinch when I was out of plastic filler, I tried Elmer's Carpenter's wood filler (the new stuff) it goes on purple in color then turns beige when dry. This stuff seems to be ok for models since it is low odor and water soluable and very fine in texture.  I sculpted a contured  large gap on a 1/48 F-111 and it's been holding well for a year now.

 
I watched a interesting video on you-tube showing a guy using the Elmer's filler to make ZIM on a tank.  Seem to work really good and was easy to apply.
  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 2:51 PM

I used to use Durhams Water Putty on wood models. Never tried it on plastic.

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 4:19 PM

Tojo72
I believe that Vallejo's weathering products are water based.Check them out.
 

thanks Tojo most of my weathering stuff is Vallejo's. i find it actualy realy goodYesSmile

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 4:20 PM

Marcus McBean

 

 
Jay Jay

In a pinch when I was out of plastic filler, I tried Elmer's Carpenter's wood filler (the new stuff) it goes on purple in color then turns beige when dry. This stuff seems to be ok for models since it is low odor and water soluable and very fine in texture.  I sculpted a contured  large gap on a 1/48 F-111 and it's been holding well for a year now.

 

 

 
I watched a interesting video on you-tube showing a guy using the Elmer's filler to make ZIM on a tank.  Seem to work really good and was easy to apply.
 

i will see if i can find the video and check it out

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 4:23 PM

GMorrison

I used to use Durhams Water Putty on wood models. Never tried it on plastic.

 

dont know if it was just the wood putty i used but it has very fine sand like grains in it wich you cant sand out. but i will have a look at it

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 8:55 AM

I have used latex wood putty in a pinch.  Yes, it has some fine texture, but a coat of a good primer fills the texture okay.  It has a somewhat longer setup time than my regular auto spot putty- only reason I used it those times.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by crazypat on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 3:50 PM

thanks Don, i have tried that i don't know if it is exactly the same stuff as you use but i could not get it to blend properly into the model to create a seamless finish. don't know if it was just the way i used it but but i just got a tiny little ridge no matter how hard i tried, and as you say it has a fine texture that shows up really well on my 1/48 lancaster even with a good coat of primer

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