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Updated - Cleaning up this kind of sprue attachment?

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  • Member since
    December, 2017
Updated - Cleaning up this kind of sprue attachment?
Posted by KyleBragger on Sunday, December 03, 2017 8:46 AM

I'm wondering if anyone has tips on cleaning up this kind of sprue attachment. Newer Tamiya and Eduard kits seem to use it, which is great, since it keeps visible surfaces free of any kind of cutting/cleanup. 

However no matter the approach I take, sprue cutters or saw or just trimming with a blade, it always seems to create a divot in the surface, I guess from the forces of the plastic being sheared away, requiring filler or cleanup. 

 Images: https://www.dropbox.com/s/i2x51vs6zku90s2/IMG_6931.JPG?dl=0 + https://www.dropbox.com/s/l0mykmtcfi74d6t/IMG_6930.JPG?dl=0 + https://www.dropbox.com/s/bk78z0szctv8wz0/IMG_6929.JPG?dl=0

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, December 04, 2017 2:53 PM

Snip it, sand it, and you're done. It's not that hard to do....

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by KyleBragger on Monday, December 04, 2017 2:56 PM

Sure, but my question I'd posed is how to do so without creating a divot in the plastic. It seems whichever way I cut the attachment it creates shear forces on the part, even with good quality sprue cutters. 

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Monday, December 04, 2017 3:04 PM

When you snip the part off the carrier frame with your flush cutter, cut away from the part, leaving a bit of sprue still attached to the part to help absorb the stress of the cut. Then, use your X-Acto blade to whittle it down a bit. A file is ideal for taking the rest of the attachment point down flush to the surface of the part, but a sanding stick can also be used. It takes a moment or two longer than cutting flush against the part itself, but it definitely prevents divots and damage that you'll need to putty later on.

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Monday, December 04, 2017 5:11 PM

In addition to KT's good advice here's my two cents. For most large parts I'll do the cut close then trim method, and then follow up with a fingernail or toenail cutter held perpendicular to the part. I forget where I saw this tip; maybe Swanny's website? It's amazing how close a trim you can get, requiring very little filing or sanding to get smooth.

For small and delicate parts I use a UMM razor saw for very clean and accurate cuts. It helps to hold the sprue against a cutting surface to avoid slipping. I use blocks of veneer plywood or an old cutting board. A modeller named Chuck W. who used to post here had an interesting tip - when the thin razor saw blades break, take the useful pieces and make mini saws by CAing them into slots in short lengths of wood. I use wooden dowels. These little saws are incredibly handy for the tight spots in some sprues. 

Mike

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 8:06 AM

KyleBragger

Sure, but my question I'd posed is how to do so without creating a divot in the plastic. It seems whichever way I cut the attachment it creates shear forces on the part, even with good quality sprue cutters. 

 

Use the UMM saw blade. It makes clean cuts rarely needing any sanding. 

I will use the sprue cutter to cut well above the attachment point to leave a short piece in order to have more room to get a smooth clean cut. I then use the UMM paper thin razor saw blade by itself to carefully saw the small sprue attachment.

Using sprue cutters here will for the most part create a dent on the part or create tiny spider webbing cracks in a clear plastic part like a canopy.

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by KyleBragger on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 6:44 PM

Thanks for all the replies, folks.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 1:36 PM

Hi Kyle ;

   What I do is this . I cut the part off as far from the joint and surrounding sprue as I can . Then when I have more control I cut the parts at an angle of the edge of the part matching the part's angle or curve .

 Using a New # 11 blade I gently take it down till it's almost not there anymore .Then I finish up with a sanding stick wide enough that when done the divot or bump is gone for good .On an edge like a wing trailing or leading edge I also give a gentle sand down the length to make sure of the trueness of the area .  T.B.

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