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Any tips for applying glitter to a model?

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  • Member since
    April, 2008
Any tips for applying glitter to a model?
Posted by Kizzy on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:53 PM

I'm working on a scale model of a winged princess and would like to add some multi-colored or silver glitter to her wings, face, legs, etc. to give the model a little bit of a "pixie dust" effect.  I've already airbrushed all of the parts with their color and am looking for tips on how to apply the glitter now that the model is painted.  Also looking for any recommendations on what kind of glitter to use, and where to purchase it.

Is this something that would be lightly brushed on by hand?  My girlfriend has a collection of different dry glitters -- I was thinking maybe I could add some of that to a few drops of diluted white glue and then paint it on in a very thin layer with a wide brush.

Having never done this before I was looking for some advice.  I did a search but surprisingly could not find anything on the topic!

Thanks in advance,

Kizzy

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:14 PM

Airbrushing glitter with lightly diluted white glue will not work nor is advised. You’re asking for nothing but trouble and instant clog. 

  • Member since
    April, 2008
Posted by Kizzy on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:17 PM

Yeah I really didn't think so, and honestly wouldn't have tried it...though I've seen elsewhere some who claim to mix a little glitter in with their paint (not with glue!) when they airbrush it.

So...failing that, do you normally just dilute white glue into a thin liquid, and add glitter to that, then hand brush it on?  Seems like that would work.  Maybe I'm answering my own question.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:40 PM

One issue i can see with useing white glue is that it has a sheen when dried. If you wanted a mat finish you would have to add a clear coat and this could cancel out the effect of the glitter. How about mixing the glitter in a clear coat rather than white glue. Either way, i would suggest trying it out on a practrice piece.

'I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so'

  • Member since
    April, 2008
Posted by Kizzy on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:45 PM

Interesting point, I hadn't thought of that.  I have a few different clears on hand.  Will run a few tests.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:50 PM

I’d suggest airbrushing on a clear coat that takes a few moments to dry, and sprinkle on the glitter. Probably best to work in one small area at a time.

 

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N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:51 PM

How about those color-changing prismatic paints the car guys use?  I've not tried them, so I do not know if a thin misting will yield the effect you are looking for.  Others may know more.

  • Member since
    April, 2008
Posted by Kizzy on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:57 PM

Some good suggestions here, thanks guys.

What do you think about thinly diluting some Future with water, so as to not add too much gloss to the finish, and then adding the glitter to that, and brushing it on?  I'd think that should help it "stick".

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:28 PM

The only way I can think to get this to work is to dust the dry glitter onto a wet finish. Ideally it would have been the base color paint, but that ship sailed. 

The challenge will be controlling density. Prepare to get "creative" results.

I would try brushing on Future, and then applying the glitter. The car guys flock seats this way, but they go for a dense coating and tap off the excess.

When I built RR scenery, I slopped down a wet coat of earth color paint and then sifted ground cover on it.

You will want a small wire mesh strainer with holes big enough for the glittler particles. Get the model wet, and then put some glitter in the strainer, hold it over the model and tap the edge of the strainer with your finger tip.

 

Good luck.

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 11:30 PM

Just trying to think outside the box here and I surely haven't had much experience with glitter outside elementary school art class, but consider perhaps using a metallic embossing powder for this project.

Example

It's quite a bit finer than traditional glitter and the scrapbookers and calligraphers use it a lot in embossing, where the powder is poured over wet ink and left to dry. Given that, in theory, it ought to stick to a tacky clear coat. It might (MIGHT) just require loading up a brush and lightly tapping or flicking the powder onto the wet clear to get a decent finish without clumps of glue and oversized glitter.

Michael's and Hobby Lobby carry them, as well as some office supply companies that carry specialized stationary. It's worth your time to shop carefully, because in addition to choices in color and texture, you can also find powders that will melt with a hairdryer, giving you all sorts of options to play with in building layers or doing effects like makeup.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, May 24, 2018 1:32 AM

GMorrison
The only way I can think to get this to work is to dust the dry glitter onto a wet finish. Ideally it would have been the base color paint, but that ship sailed.

You could still use this approach by applying a clear coat, sprinkle the glitter on while it's wet, then allow to dry and seal with a finishing clear coat.

Mixing with a liquid medium and applying by brush is a sure invitation for streaks and an ugly, uneven distribution.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, May 24, 2018 7:04 AM

I'm kind of late to this, but, Michael's has craft store acrylic glitter paint Here

It doesn't look like it can be airbrushed, but, it can be applied with a brush. And there are quite a few choices. 

Good luck!

 Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:16 AM

I seem to remember a clear coat that had glitter in it.  Don't remember whose it was, nor if it is still available. It was some time ago.  It was a gloss overcoat but I assume you could overcoat it with a compatible dull coat.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, May 24, 2018 11:34 AM

Could try Future on just the areas you want to cover, lightly blow some glitter from your hand while it's wet, then finish coat.

Or a clear enamel.

An iridesent powder (pearl) mixed in clear could be airbrushed, but I think mixing any kind of glitter and airbrushing is going to clog up the brush in an instant.

 

The color shifting automotive paint is a little on the spendy side....last time I heard was around $39.00 an ounce.

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by knox on Thursday, May 24, 2018 3:38 PM

I don’t know if they have it, but have you looked for glitter makeup. Seems like that might be easier to control, if they have it. 

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by Modelsinc1967 on Monday, June 04, 2018 3:32 PM

Kizzy

I'm working on a scale model of a winged princess and would like to add some multi-colored or silver glitter to her wings, face, legs, etc. to give the model a little bit of a "pixie dust" effect.  I've already airbrushed all of the parts with their color and am looking for tips on how to apply the glitter now that the model is painted.  Also looking for any recommendations on what kind of glitter to use, and where to purchase it.

Is this something that would be lightly brushed on by hand?  My girlfriend has a collection of different dry glitters -- I was thinking maybe I could add some of that to a few drops of diluted white glue and then paint it on in a very thin layer with a wide brush.

Having never done this before I was looking for some advice.  I did a search but surprisingly could not find anything on the topic!

Thanks in advance,

Kizzy

 

 

You can pick this glitter paint up at Hobby Lobby where I picked it up. It is actually a glitter paint. Mine is gold for a themed built model truck but should work for what you are doing if you can mask off the area. May be able to decant it and brush on but have not tried that yet.

the paint...

my test of the glitter paint under deja blue one coat laquer.

The photos do not do justice to this paint. It is incredible what it looks like up close. I love using this stuff. You have to buy a sealer for the glitter they sell with the paint. But once you seal it you can keep coating over it. This particular test sample has three coats of clear over it to even out the glitter......

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