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Wet-sanding Perfect Plastic Putty?

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  • Member since
    August, 2012
Wet-sanding Perfect Plastic Putty?
Posted by JMorgan on Thursday, June 07, 2018 4:44 PM

Has anyone else had a problem doing this? It seems that the Putty softens.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, June 07, 2018 5:15 PM

PPP is water soluble, so yes it will dissolve with water. I will let it dry then knock down some of the access with a damp q-tip, then finish sand with fine sanding tools.

 Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, June 07, 2018 6:38 PM

Not being able to wet sand is my only complaint about PPP.

It's a kind of a big deal to me, I like to be able to wet sand, but I guess we can't have everything.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Friday, June 08, 2018 5:18 AM

Apply PPP, let it set off, then smooth with damp Q-tip, finger, radius tool, etc..

Key advantage is that it can be smoothed while not set, doing most of the work in applicaton, so that you don't loose rivet details, etc.

Takes a little lateral rethink.

East Mids Model Club 28th Annual Show 20th MAY 2018

 http://www.eastmidsmodelclub.co.uk/

Don't feed the CM!

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, June 08, 2018 9:41 AM

Yeah ; 

 I just discovered that myself . I had some spots on My Noordyun Norseman and I wet sanded . It all disappeared ! had to do it over .Oh Well , Lesson learned !

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, June 08, 2018 1:17 PM

Greg

Not being able to wet sand is my only complaint about PPP.

It's a kind of a big deal to me, I like to be able to wet sand, but I guess we can't have everything.

  

 

Greg, PPP sands smooth as silk. I remove as much as possible with a damp paper towel or Q Tip which reduces all or most of any sanding. Then shoot it with either Future or Aqua Gloss to get rid of any surface texture difference for a perfect paint surface.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Friday, June 08, 2018 4:57 PM

Why wet sand?

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, June 08, 2018 5:23 PM

plasticjunkie
Greg, PPP sands smooth as silk. I remove as much as possible with a damp paper towel or Q Tip which reduces all or most of any sanding. Then shoot it with either Future or Aqua Gloss to get rid of any surface texture difference for a perfect paint surface.

Thanks for you input, Ernie. You know it is always appreciated.

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, June 08, 2018 5:25 PM

modelmaker66

Why wet sand?

 

I think the idea is that the water carry away the sanding debris and loose abrasive material, sort of like cutting fluid in a grinding machine.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong.

-Greg

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, June 08, 2018 8:15 PM

Greg
 
modelmaker66

Why wet sand?

 

 

 

I think the idea is that the water carry away the sanding debris and loose abrasive material, sort of like cutting fluid in a grinding machine.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong.

 

You are welcome. True that Greg on solvent type fillers but PPP is water based as previously mentioned.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, June 08, 2018 9:20 PM

plasticjunkie
True that Greg on solvent type fillers but PPP is water based as previously mentioned.

Right. I just meant for putties and such that are wet-sandable, Ernie. As we know, PPP turns to mud. :)

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Saturday, June 09, 2018 1:46 AM

Thanks for the reply. Just sounds like a mess to me. Wipe down the part with a cloth when done.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, June 10, 2018 9:04 AM

Hi;

  As an owner and builder of cars in  a Auto Body Shop that Repaired rather than replaced parts , Wet sanding was the Cats Meow .

 In models it is too .When you wet sand , any large rough particles that would crust up in the grit are instead washed away . Leaving a truly smooth surface. On a real auto this gives a surface like fine satin to the touch , but a heck of a sticky surface for the coming layers of paint !

 On a model now . Sanding wet , with 1800 grit or higher gives a silky surface and gives you that Winning surface finish !

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, June 10, 2018 11:09 AM

Yep, that's why I like wet sanding too, TB.

-Greg

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