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Removing dried Tamiya Putty

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  • Member since
    May, 2016
Removing dried Tamiya Putty
Posted by Hobbie on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 1:14 AM

Good morning everyone,

I dug out a 1/35 Tamiya Tiger from my parents's attic that I let sleep for a solid 15 years.

As I was unexperienced and that aftermarket parts were hard to come by, I covered the unglued parts in grey Tamiya putty and tried to recreate the zimmerit with a scalpel blade.

That's the point where you start throwing stones at me. Fair enough. Black Eye

The kit is unbuilt and full ; I can still use it if I manage to take out the putty and slap some aftermarket zimmerit in its place.

I made a rather successful trial on the front panel : Q-tip, aceton, then Revell airbrush cleaner.

Still, considering the tedious aspect, the amount of airbrush cleaner required and the toxic fumes festival that it represents, I wonder if someone would have other advices.

Thanks already :-)

Arguing with an engineer is like wrestling with a pig in the mud : after a while, you realize the pig likes it.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 10:20 AM

You could stick it in a covered container overnight to let it do its work. Just a thought. Perhaps other will chime in.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 11:30 AM

Ask yourself if the effort is worth the $ 30 or so a new kit would cost, and would the results be equal.

All of the other parts that don't have putty on them are useful for other projects.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by Hobbie on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 1:46 PM

BlackSheep, I thought about it but I fear the aceton starts to attack the plastic if I leave the parts in for too long... I maybe wrong on this though...

Gmorrison : good point... it's just that knee-jerk reaction, shame to let it go to waste ;-) but I must say I tend to agree with you...

Arguing with an engineer is like wrestling with a pig in the mud : after a while, you realize the pig likes it.

  • Member since
    September, 2017
Posted by Sailing_Dutchman on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 2:04 PM

I am with Gmorrison, but if you want to use the same kit you could try grinding/sanding it off. Tamiya putty is solvant based and will melt some of the plastic to create a firm bond that is quite difficult to remove. Any solvent that can remove the putty will also damage the plastic underneath.

   

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 2:28 PM

Try slipping it in a plastic garbage bag and put it in the freezer overnight; it might make the putty brittle enough to be chipped off more easily with a scraper or a wire brush.

Good luck.

 

 

 

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:54 PM

If you have a Dremel tool I would suggest using a grinding bit and a very deft steady touch to remove the putty. Since you’re going to add on AM zimmerit to recoat it, any small dings to the base surface are no big deal.

 

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U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 10:39 PM

All great ideas from putting in the freezer to using a dremel tool . Heck why not stick it in the freezer then use a dremel tool? Or buy a new kit.

Look at it this way, if you decide to buy a new one, save the old kit for spare parts.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 10:59 PM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

All great ideas from putting in the freezer to using a dremel tool . Heck why not stick it in the freezer then use a dremel tool? Or buy a new kit.

Look at it this way, if you decide to buy a new one, save the old kit for spare parts.

 

I like the way this man thinks. About the moment where the OP finally gets all of the putty off, he realizes that the assembly was a earlier skill set. Don't ask me how I know.

AFA the method used, Back in the day there was no such thing as AM Zim. We all did that thing with Squadron putty. I liked it. 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by Hobbie on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 1:20 AM

Thanks a lot for the tips, guys! This big kitten ain't a priority for now anyway, and like GMorrison reminded, I can get the same or even more recent issues, less troublesome and with most goodies included, but I'll try to salvage it anyway - I won't lose any sleep if I can't!

I think a mix of all this should help : freezing and dremeling the biggest chunks, then cleaning up the rest with a Q-tip... If I get there, I'll try to keep you posted ;-) Thanks for your help!

Arguing with an engineer is like wrestling with a pig in the mud : after a while, you realize the pig likes it.

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