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Shaping Parts-All Media

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  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Shaping Parts-All Media
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, December 12, 2020 10:11 AM

Here's one I have mentioned only once and that was a long time ago.

        Say you are thinking about these things, P.E., a Paper Model, A Wood Model or something with a lot of flat thin metal components! And Yes! Plastic too ( Scratch Built!).

        There's something we need to know as well as Gluing, Painting and Modifying as well. It's shaping basic components into the parts we need to finish the parts or details. The process is simpler than you think. In wood it works well if you wet the wood , shape it on a jig, then let it dry. It will take shape as it dries and make your work easier. Never think for a moment you just do this and it's done. You still have to make the part fit.

     When you shape there's methods you can use that have been used for many centuries for just that. Rolling ( using a Dull side of a knife or the edge of a ruler) Curving like a bowl or dome. This on takes another idea that works. With wood and paper it's the same in many ways. In Wood, heat is used too ( Mainly Steam). With paper it's a very fine mist on the paper. Then a craft sponge and a Spoon or other Device to press the damp paper into for shaping, and time to dry.

       This assumes that you have taken art classes in basic grade school and know what a Cone , Cube, and Sphere and Folds are! These are the mostly needed shapes you deal with.

      Always keep a tool for creasing the paper ON the line as drawn. Nope, not next to the line. But, Right on it. This is important for hiding the printed lines on a paper model and making sure metal or plastic parts fit well! Make Sure this tool can crease sharply WITHOUT cutting through the paper or thin plastic. With thin plastic it helps if the plastic is done with multiple sweeps of the tool. 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, December 13, 2020 8:53 AM

I pick my materials depending on what degree of curvature needed.  For single radius bend, like hood of hotrod, or hatch on aircraft, I prefer aluminum.  I bought a big roll of bare roof flashing aluminum, a five buck roll that has lasted a decade so far.  For compound curves I love to carve wood.  I have intentions of building a decent vacu-forming machine (bought a cheap little surplus vacuum pump.

For rods, I find brass rods from K & S available in lots of sizes.  I also use styrene rod but those are somewhat limited in sizes.

For smaller parts I have carved wood masters and made silicone molds for urethane resin casting, especially if I need many duplicates of parts- works fine for wheels and tires.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Sunday, December 13, 2020 11:03 AM

Hi Don;

       Surprise! I have broken out a fascinating Box. On it is a picture of a strange looking machine with Masters. What? Yup! an unopened vintage Vac-U-Form by Mattel!

      I never understood marketing by these folks. Around the same time they came out with the " Easy-Bake" oven! These are still sold! Why did they take the Vac-U-Form off the market. Oh, some poor little boy didn't pay attention and burned a finger, by, putting his hand in the wrong place?

       It states on the box that it has heat so be careful! I found the home-made platens I had with my original machine that had somehow developed legs! So I can actually do even quarters of larger domes and other structures, even the necessary ribs for plane super detailing. I don't need no darned 3-D Printer!

 When I bought this thing last summer I didn't do more than check that it worked. Then Back in the box and in the garage. Found it some time ago.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, December 14, 2020 7:36 AM

I stil have my vacuform, but it doesn't work anymore. Heater shot and vacuum weak.  And, want something a bit larger.  I had built one about 20 years ago, using my shop vacuum, but that was not very good-not a low enough vacuum.  New design I am working on uses a little 12 volt pump.  It is supposed to pull a pretty good vacuum, but at a slow rate.  I'll build in a reservoir and quick acting valve.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Monday, December 14, 2020 10:41 AM

Hey Don;

 Don't laugh! I pulled a badly damaged one apart to see what made it work so well for a toy. A flat "O"ring and a heater similar to the one cup coffee water heater was about it.

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