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How many of you use home brew thinners for acrylic paint?

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  • Member since
    February, 2017
How many of you use home brew thinners for acrylic paint?
Posted by Chip on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 6:18 PM
I have seen various articles online about making your own thinners when it comes to acrylic paint.  From what I have read the general consensous is 2:1 distilled water:IPA with some drops of flow improver and retarder.
 
I am a newbie to the hobby so was wondering if the majority on this forum subscribe to homemade thinners or is sticking to the paint's mfg thinner still the prescribed method when it comes to thinning acrylic paint? 
Inquiring minds want to know.

Cheers!
  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 7:28 PM

Brew your own thinner? Nope. You're better off buying them. Every brand paint, be it lacquers, enamels or acrylcs have different properties and chemicals. No two thinners are alike; thus the reason to stick with the brand thinner to your paint. I use Testors brand Universal acrylic thinner for all my acrylic paint.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 8:19 PM

Acrylics are a peculiar lot when working with "improvised" thinners. What works well with one brand, may not work well, or worse, with another. There is no one size fits all answer for acrylics due to the various paint formulas out there sold as acrylics. Obviously the manufacturers own thinner will yield best results with their product. But then if you are like many folks here you have more than one brand in your paint supply and may end up with multiple thinners as well. Some acrylic thinners may work with more than one brand of paint, but they certainly will not work with all brands. 

Welcome to the hobby and good luck to you.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Thursday, March 23, 2017 5:02 AM

Yup:

been there done that: Windsor & Newton Art brand retatders/extenders with IPA:

Results: Inconsistent with several brands & disaster with Vallejo due to IPA.

My 2c/Tuppence h'apenny:

Stick with the brands' own thinners retarders/extenders, you will get much better consistency & repeatability...

Tamiya will work with IPA, Halfords' (UK) own-brand windscreen wash, but best with X20a.

VJ ModelAIR will only work consistently with own brand Thinner, Future (!) or Ultimate  brands, my preference is MEDEA brand airbrish cleaner.


VJ Polyeurethane Primer thins a little with Future.

Hataka will spray, but is very fragile on anything that isn't primed especially resins, use their thinner.

Xtracrylics thins with Medea brand or their own.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Northern New Jersey
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, March 23, 2017 6:26 AM
Definitely do not.Prefer to use manufacturers stuff

  • Member since
    October, 2010
Posted by hypertex on Thursday, March 23, 2017 7:50 AM

Here is how I think abou it. The folks who formulate the paint have education, training, and experience that I don't have. I doubt that I can outsmart them.

  • Member since
    February, 2017
Posted by Chip on Thursday, March 23, 2017 1:16 PM

Seems like this is NOT a widely used practice though the cost savings sure make it an attractive option.  That said being 4 kits into the hobby, I have only used about a third of the Tamiya x20a thinner that I bought for around $9 a couple months ago. 

I will continue to stick with the Tamiya x20-a thinner that I have been using.

Thanks to all of you who replied.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, March 23, 2017 1:30 PM

Own brand thinner for me as well. Only exception is Tamiya.I use the halfords own brand screenwash.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Fw 190D-9    

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, March 23, 2017 3:13 PM

If you're working with Tamiya, I can send this tidbit. One of our IPMS chapter members is a chemist by trade. So he did an analysis of Tamiya thinner. 98% Isopropyl Alcohol and 2% fragrance. So if you are just speaking strictly Tamiya, and suddenly run out and have no hobby shop nearby that has Tamiya thinner on hand, Isopropyl Alcohol is a viable option.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    February, 2017
Posted by ugamodels on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 10:10 PM

I use denatured alcohol for a lot of things (like shellac). How does that compare with using isopropyl? Can you ask the chemist?

I type on a tablet. Please excuse the terseness and the autocorrect. Not to mention the erors. 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
Posted by damouav on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 11:17 PM

I am of the understanding that Tamiya Acrylic use an acrylic based laquer thinner.

So, I use an automotive acrylic laquer thinner with excellent results. Its easily available and its far cheaper than a branded Tamiya product by volume by a considerable margin.

The only down side is that I needed to build a spray both to evacuate the fumes.

In Progress
1/48 Hobby Boss TBF-1C Avenger
Pending
1/48 Tamiya P-47-D Bubbletop
1/48 Hasegawa P51-D
1/48 Roden S.E.5a
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, April 13, 2017 9:10 AM

ugamodels

I use denatured alcohol for a lot of things (like shellac). How does that compare with using isopropyl? Can you ask the chemist?

 

Denatured alcohol is not a type of alcohol.  It means a poison additive is put into it to prevent it being drunk.  Based on tax situation for ethyl alcohol.  So it is usually ethyl.  Isopropyl works great as a thinner for most acrylic paints, and has other uses in model building. I always keep a bottle on my work bench.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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