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Airbrush Spray booth

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  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Easton, CT
Airbrush Spray booth
Posted by Doug vH on Friday, May 05, 2017 7:40 PM

Out of curiosity what are folk’s using for a spray booth? I'm on the verge of building my own with a 150cfm bathroom exhaust fan, furnace filter, and ¼” ply. Looking for 20-24 inch wide opening.
 
 This is the fan i was looking at
 
 
-Doug
  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Snibs on Friday, May 05, 2017 11:14 PM

Hi Doug.

Here's what I use

http://snibs.net/spraybooth.html

few bits of velcro and you can attach a filter without a problem. Cheap but affective.

Mick.

My airbrush and modeling page.

Two cheap spray booths compared, the BD-512 and HS-E420DC

On The Bench.

USS Voyager.

F/A-18A. 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, May 06, 2017 9:01 AM

Mine is a homemade booth using a 125 cfm fan and 16 x 20 furnace filter. It works great!

I have built about 7 or 8 homemade spray booths, starting with cardboard boxes and an auto air filter.  The last booth I made was using the same fan as the new one, and also furnace filters.  Only problems were it was heavy, and since it was hung on my shop wall, it was too hard to take down to change filters.  Also, changing filters was too hard.

My current one is made from quarter inch plywood, much lighter than the old one, and has a hinged rear compartment that makes changing filters a snap.  Two quick release clamps allow me to raise up that hinged rear compartment and change the filter.

I use a five inch muffin fan, no commutator (spark free), and it cost about twenty bucks.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Saturday, May 06, 2017 12:36 PM

$141 just for a fan!? Yikes! I bought my own spray booth for far less than that - less than $100. This is what I got:

http://www.tcpglobal.com/MASB420DCK.html?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=(roi)+product+listing+ads+-+tcp&utm_content=all+products&utm_term=holiday+gift+guide#.WQ4JjYWcGAg

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by damouav on Saturday, May 06, 2017 7:43 PM

Doug,

I just finished building my own spray booth several weeks ago at an overall cost of about $100 AUD. I read numerous articles and ended up using this idea from several sources. The design is not mine, I found it and adapted it for my use.

I used a stock standard bathroom fan (brushless motor), 9mm MDF, LED light, a filter and some 300mm AC ducting. I wired up the fan and light to a switch and added a lead.

It extracts about 220cfm (fan rated at 400cfm but with filter its reduced) which is sufficent to pull the lacquer smell from the area. The window slides, so I open it, place the board in the gap (which I taped the duct to) and close the window, when I'm done I reverse the process.

I need to purchased some more filter material and do a better job with attaching it within the booth, but it works.

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by RX7850 on Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:59 PM

I built mine around a telescoping stove top vent that cost $15 to $50 (I've bought two at those prices) used. Encased it in a wood cabinet with folding leaf,  added wheels and piping. Topped it off with a poster foam board cover. Work area is 21" x "40 with the leaf up and 9" x "40 with the leaf down. It has three speeds with a maximum cfm. of 650. My total investment was well under $100. The fan you chose will def. do the job. But if you want to save some cash there are other options. I"m glad to see someone else taking on a DIY spray booth its the best way to go. Good luck with your project and post up when it's done.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Easton, CT
Posted by Doug vH on Saturday, May 06, 2017 10:37 PM

Thanks all for the ideas. I'll definitely keep on the hunt for a cheaper 150 cfm fan, but think the 1/4 ply and furnace filter is a winning combo based on you posts. 

 

-Doug

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Easton, CT
Posted by Doug vH on Saturday, May 06, 2017 10:54 PM

Don Stauffer

Mine is a homemade booth using a 125 cfm fan and 16 x 20 furnace filter. It works great!

I have built about 7 or 8 homemade spray booths, starting with cardboard boxes and an auto air filter.  The last booth I made was using the same fan as the new one, and also furnace filters.  Only problems were it was heavy, and since it was hung on my shop wall, it was too hard to take down to change filters.  Also, changing filters was too hard.

My current one is made from quarter inch plywood, much lighter than the old one, and has a hinged rear compartment that makes changing filters a snap.  Two quick release clamps allow me to raise up that hinged rear compartment and change the filter.

I use a five inch muffin fan, no commutator (spark free), and it cost about twenty bucks.

 

 

 

Don,

 

 I really liked your muffin fan idea, are your similar to these 110cfms? I'm thinking 2 3-4" behind the filter, then an air chamber behind with the vent flange. 

http://www.acinfinity.com/axial-ac-fan-kits/axial-1238-muffin-115v-ac-cooling-fan-120mm-x-120mm-x-38mm/

Much better pricing ;)

-Doug

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by damouav on Sunday, May 07, 2017 6:32 AM

Doug,

Be aware that once you place a filter in front of the fan the overall cfm will be reduced significantly, this is why I went for a 400cfm fan.

I would recommend at least a 300cfm allowing for flow reduction due to the filter.

Your aiming for about a minimum extraction rate of about 150-200cfm.

Damian

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Easton, CT
Posted by Doug vH on Sunday, May 07, 2017 7:30 AM

damouav

Doug,

Be aware that once you place a filter in front of the fan the overall cfm will be reduced significantly, this is why I went for a 400cfm fan.

I would recommend at least a 300cfm allowing for flow reduction due to the filter.

Your aiming for about a minimum extraction rate of about 150-200cfm.

Damian

 

Thanks Damian. 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 07, 2017 11:33 AM

Doug vH

 

 
Don Stauffer

Mine is a homemade booth using a 125 cfm fan and 16 x 20 furnace filter. It works great!

I have built about 7 or 8 homemade spray booths, starting with cardboard boxes and an auto air filter.  The last booth I made was using the same fan as the new one, and also furnace filters.  Only problems were it was heavy, and since it was hung on my shop wall, it was too hard to take down to change filters.  Also, changing filters was too hard.

My current one is made from quarter inch plywood, much lighter than the old one, and has a hinged rear compartment that makes changing filters a snap.  Two quick release clamps allow me to raise up that hinged rear compartment and change the filter.

I use a five inch muffin fan, no commutator (spark free), and it cost about twenty bucks.

 

 

 

 

 

Don,

 

 I really liked your muffin fan idea, are your similar to these 110cfms? I'm thinking 2 3-4" behind the filter, then an air chamber behind with the vent flange. 

http://www.acinfinity.com/axial-ac-fan-kits/axial-1238-muffin-115v-ac-cooling-fan-120mm-x-120mm-x-38mm/

Much better pricing ;)

-Doug

 

Yes, the five inch muffin fans come in many flow rates up to about 125 to 150 CFM.  You can use any physical size you want as long is it fulfills your desired flow rate.  Also, they come in 110V AC or 12V DC. Life is easier with the AC.  You just solder on a power cord- you don't have to install a DC power supply.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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