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Runs, Runs, Runs

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6 replies
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  • Member since
    August, 2012
Runs, Runs, Runs
Posted by JMorgan on Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:27 PM

What is the best process to level them out?

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: ohio I want to leave
Posted by armor 2.0 on Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:32 PM

Sand sand sand

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, June 29, 2017 5:03 PM

Or strip and start over, depends where you are at in the process.

 

You haven't seen runs til you put them 6 inches apart the full length of a 28 foot motorhome, and for half the height of one side.  Looked like someone turned the ocean vertical

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, June 30, 2017 9:31 AM

armor 2.0

Sand sand sand

 

Yep, I agree

I had some bad runs on a 1:32 scale F-80, in gloss black getting ready for Alclad.  Gloss paint runs more readily than flat.  The runs were so bad I had to go all the way down to wet sanding with 320 grit, whereas other minor flaws in finish succommed to 600.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2006
Posted by Bearcat57 on Friday, June 30, 2017 8:10 PM

I thought this was going to be a thread about.......diarrhea. 

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Friday, June 30, 2017 11:03 PM

 LOL!

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, July 01, 2017 10:51 AM

BTW, I consider getting a good gloss paint job an exercise in brinkmanship.  You must put down a wet final coat.  The way I put it is, keep putting it on until just a moment before it runs.  How do you know before it runs?  Only way is experience.  I sanded out a lot of runs learning what it looks like at that point, and still occasionally miss it.  A good repositional lamp is essential.  Keep holding the model so that the surface you are painting makes a mirror reflection of the lamp- the brightness of that reflection is the main clue.  Even doing flats, seeing that reflection helps getting a good finish.  The flat will still have a reflective gloss when it is wet.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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