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Clear Gray

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SMH
  • Member since
    October, 2017
Clear Gray
Posted by SMH on Monday, November 06, 2017 8:25 AM

Is there a way to make your own clear gray. I only need a small amount, and don't want to buy it, just to have it sit around and go bad.

I'm thinking what makes a clear gray is they leave the white pigment out making it translucent. 

Ideas?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, November 06, 2017 9:01 AM

What will you be using it for? If you have an airbrush and dial the paint flow way back, you can get a translucent gray.  I do that a lot for weathering.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, November 06, 2017 10:03 AM

Tamiya X-19 Smoke is a clear grey....

  • Member since
    July, 2008
  • From: Albany, NY
Posted by jeffpez on Monday, November 06, 2017 10:03 AM

You might try Tamiya X-19 smoke. It's more translucent than clear and is a darkish grey but if misted lightly could do the trick.

  • Member since
    October, 2010
Posted by hypertex on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 5:29 AM

Take some compatible varnish (clear coat) and mix in an appropriate shade of gray. Adjust the ratio until desired translucency is acheived. I use Tamiya clear flat, which gives me a translucent paint that doesn't have the gloss of the Tamia clear paints.

SMH
  • Member since
    October, 2017
Posted by SMH on Thursday, November 09, 2017 9:02 AM

Don Stauffer

What will you be using it for? If you have an airbrush and dial the paint flow way back, you can get a translucent gray.  I do that a lot for weathering.

 

 

Revell's Corvette C7.R head lightcover.

After a couple of crazy days at work, I got to experiment using your suggestion. A thinned down Testor's enamel black metallic looks spot on. It looks like a medium to dark shinny translucent grey.

Thanks

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Sunday, November 12, 2017 10:31 PM

What is this used for?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, November 13, 2017 8:39 AM

SMH

 

 
Don Stauffer

What will you be using it for? If you have an airbrush and dial the paint flow way back, you can get a translucent gray.  I do that a lot for weathering.

 

 

 

 

Revell's Corvette C7.R head lightcover.

After a couple of crazy days at work, I got to experiment using your suggestion. A thinned down Testor's enamel black metallic looks spot on. It looks like a medium to dark shinny translucent grey.

Thanks

 

For that kind of thing I tend to use marker pens.  Most of them leave a less than opaque coating on plastic. I would experiment with various pens, however.  Or, if no scrap transparent plastic, use other than permanent markers.  I like the highlighter types for tail-light and turn-signal lenses, very transparent color.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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