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Applying Tamiya Clear

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  • Member since
    December, 2017
Applying Tamiya Clear
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 9:02 AM

I'm getting back into models after 25+ years. I've been watching youtube videos and learning a lot. One technique I discovered was applying 3 or more coats of Tamiya clear and buffing to a shine. Can anyone give me advice on how to achieve a nice glossy finish? After applying Tamiya clear my model looks dull and the paint feels grainy. I ordered some Tamiya polishing compound which is still on the way. Do I need to presand the finish before applying the compound? The finest sand paper I have is 2000.

Thanks

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, December 28, 2017 10:05 AM

Hate to stat the obvious, but could you use a glass clear coat. I am sure Tamiya does a glossclear.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Rudel Stage 3

                     Academy 1/72nd Apache AH.1

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 1:14 PM

I'm using this. Is this not supposed to be glossy?

https://www.amazon.com/Tamiya-Acrylic-X22-Gloss-Clear/dp/B0006O523U

I've also used pledge/future, but what I'd really like to acheive is a car like shine.

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 1:20 PM

I think I found the answer to my own question...

http://www.militarymodelling.com/forums/postings.asp?th=42979

 

"You did not do anything wrong, in fact you had a lucky escape. As Si said Tamiya Clear is added to matt paint to give a gloss finish and Flat Base is added to gloss paint to give a matt finish. If either Clear or Flat Base are sprayed on a model they will ruin it. "

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 1:23 PM

Ok so it looks like I can't use x-22 as a clear coat. Anyone have any recommendations on what I can use instead? Enamel lacquer acrylic?

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, December 28, 2017 1:54 PM

I don't use the Tamiya clears so was not to familiar with what you are useing. As this is for a car, its a bit out of my area, i only want enough of a gloss to apply decals. You could try multiple coats, but i am sure the car guys might have some useful tips. If you edit the title of your thread and ask for help getting a gloss finish on cars, you might catch there attention.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Rudel Stage 3

                     Academy 1/72nd Apache AH.1

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 2:00 PM

Bish

I don't use the Tamiya clears so was not to familiar with what you are useing. As this is for a car, its a bit out of my area, i only want enough of a gloss to apply decals. You could try multiple coats, but i am sure the car guys might have some useful tips. If you edit the title of your thread and ask for help getting a gloss finish on cars, you might catch there attention.

 

 

I'm not looking for cars, but "car like finish" for my aircraft. I've been searching online and it looks like it is indeed possible to use tamiya x-22 as a clear coat but I looks like they're using laquer thinner as opposed to IPA which is what I was using.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyCng3nEdik

 

It's a little confusing because there's so much conflicting information out there. I've been reading up on Alclad Aqua Gloss as well. Not really sure what direction to go. I know I don't want to be using future/Pledge though. I'm looking for a durable finish that looks good.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, December 28, 2017 2:22 PM

drumsfield
I think I found the answer to my own question...

http://www.militarymodelling.com/forums/postings.asp?th=42979

 "You did not do anything wrong, in fact you had a lucky escape. As Si said Tamiya Clear is added to matt paint to give a gloss finish and Flat Base is added to gloss paint to give a matt finish. If either Clear or Flat Base are sprayed on a model they will ruin it. "

This is incorrect. While X-21 Flat Base is an additive to make gloss colours flat, X-22 Clear is a gloss finish in its own right.

Graininess with Tamiya gloss colors (and clears) is often the result of the paint not being wet enough for it to level. This often happens at the edge of the spray pattern, resulting in each pass leaving a grainy edge which is not covered by successive passes.

Thin X-22 with X-20A acrylic thinner, at about two parts thinner to one part X-22. Airbrush at a lower pressure from a closer distance.  

Apply multiple thin coats and do not use a substitute thinner like Isopropyl alcohol as this flashes off faster than X-20A thinner. Though it will thin Tamiya paint, never use water as a thinner. 

If you are of a mind to try it, Tamiya lacquer thinner will deliver even better results than X-20A, as it extends the drying time a little more and gives the paint more time to level.

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 2:27 PM

Phil_H

 

 
drumsfield
I think I found the answer to my own question...

http://www.militarymodelling.com/forums/postings.asp?th=42979

 "You did not do anything wrong, in fact you had a lucky escape. As Si said Tamiya Clear is added to matt paint to give a gloss finish and Flat Base is added to gloss paint to give a matt finish. If either Clear or Flat Base are sprayed on a model they will ruin it. "

 

This is incorrect. While X-21 Flat Base is an additive to make gloss colours flat, X-22 Clear is a gloss finish in its own right.

Graininess with Tamiya gloss colors (and clears) is often the result of the paint not being wet enough for it to level. This often happens at the edge of the spray pattern, resulting in each pass leaving a grainy edge which is not covered by successive passes.

Thin X-22 with X-20A acrylic thinner, at about two parts thinner to one part X-22. Airbrush at a lower pressure from a closer distance.  

Apply multiple thin coats and do not use a substitute thinner like Isopropyl alcohol as this flashes off faster than X-20A thinner. Though it will thin Tamiya paint, never use water as a thinner. 

If you are of a mind to try it, Tamiya lacquer thinner will deliver even better results than X-20A, as it extends the drying time a little more and gives the paint more time to level.

 

 

Thanks! My local hobby shop stocks the Mr. Color leveling thinner so I'm going to try that out. It makes sense now. The IPA likely dried out the x-22 leading to the grainy rough results. Live and learn... 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Great Southern Land
Posted by damouav on Thursday, December 28, 2017 3:23 PM

I too bought Tamiya X-22 for this exact reason, and all the articles I read where to use Tamiya Laquer Thinners. The laquer thinner produces the best results in thinning Tamiya products for airbrushing, espically the X-22 for this exact reason.

You can try Mr. Color self leveling thinners but you may find the results are not the best.

Correction: After some research it appears that Mr. Color SLT is laquer based with a retarded added, this is maybe why you get good results.

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  • Member since
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Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, December 28, 2017 8:41 PM

The Mr Color leveling thinner worked like a charm. I now have a nice shiny airplane. Thanks everyone!

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Great Southern Land
Posted by damouav on Thursday, December 28, 2017 11:44 PM

...

In Progress
1/48 Hasegawa P51-D
1/48 Hobby Boss TBF-1C Avenger
Pending
1/48 Tamiya P47-D Bubbletop
1/48 Roden S.E.5a
1/48 Airfix Walrus
1/48 Hasegawa P38-L
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, December 29, 2017 9:20 AM

With any gloss clearcoat, you must put it on real wet/thick to get a good gloss. Spraying from too far away, or with too thin a coat, will give an eggshell or semi-matt finish.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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