SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Trouble with tamiya paint

815 views
13 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Trouble with tamiya paint
Posted by Matt B on Thursday, January 04, 2018 11:48 AM

I have always had success with tamiya paint until recently when I began using double action A/B's instead of my old paasche H. Now my paint dries to an almost sandpaper texture. I normally use x20a thinner, but Ive also tried tamiya lacquer thinner to remedy the problem. I use matte colors for all of my paint schemes, so im not sure if that plays a role or not. I dont want to give up on my badger patriot or krome just yet. Is there anything I can do?

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Thursday, January 04, 2018 2:00 PM

Strictly winging it now, but I can't see why there would be a difference between SA and DA airbrushes, relative to finished surface.

My only guess: Perhaps with the DA, you're not pulling the trigger back far enough to get a smooth wet coat. With your Paasche H you would have made your adjustments for spray and just pressed the trigger, now with the DA's you have to press the trigger and modulate pulling back travel to get the right spray density. If you're spraying on too thin, the particles might be drying before getting on the surface.

Try some scrap plastic and just go for it with some practice spraying. In my use for large area spraying with DA airbrushes, I think I'm pulling the trigger back full travel, or very near it.

Hope You get it sorted.

Patrick

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, January 04, 2018 2:40 PM

Several things to consider. 

Air pressure and distance from model. The further away you are the more likely the paint will dry before hitting the model. Thus leaving beads of paint on the surface of the model which make it look like sand paper. I find that at a lower pressure you can get closer to the model before the paint dries up. With a dual action AB it took me a while to figure out a comfortable pressure and distance to shoot from to get the desired effect i was looking for. You probably want to shoot your paint a little wetter so you may need to get in closer. Reducing the air pressure may help. I usually shoot at around 15 psi.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Posted by Matt B on Thursday, January 04, 2018 3:32 PM

Patrick206 I think your assumption is correct. I have a habit of being pretty conservative on the trigger when Im spraying and laying down thin coats. I tend to get a good bit of tip dry also. Im still getting adjusted to these new A/B's. I have a couple of old bombers I can practice on. Ill try going heavier and laying down a wetter coat of paint. Thanks.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, January 04, 2018 3:44 PM

Whilst drumsfield is correct in everything he says, I'd bet Patrick probably identified what you are doing (wrong....sorry).

I think pulling slightly back on the trigger is probably a common thing to those new to double-action a/b's. It was for me.

Whatever the cause, your paint is going on too dry and it is not the paint's fault.

You have great advice above from both drumsfield and Patrick. You're going to be fine.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Thursday, January 04, 2018 4:36 PM

Air pressure too high and you are too far from the model. It is caused by the paint drying in the air before ir gets to the model. Lower the pressure. Get closer. Thin the paint. Practice a ton. If you still want to sell it drop me a pm. I use one and they are great when you learn what it likes. If you are impatient you will not get the jhang of it.

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Thursday, January 04, 2018 6:12 PM

Matt B

Patrick206 I think your assumption is correct. I have a habit of being pretty conservative on the trigger when Im spraying and laying down thin coats. I tend to get a good bit of tip dry also. Im still getting adjusted to these new A/B's. I have a couple of old bombers I can practice on. Ill try going heavier and laying down a wetter coat of paint. Thanks.

 

Matt - You're entirely welcome, hope that gets you the results you want.

Something to reflect on, airbrushing  is largely based on the amount of spraying you do, relative to reaching full confidence. It took me quite a long time, to reach a comfort level that made feel assured I was going to be able to get satisfactory finishes, on a routine basis. (But still I can make what looks like the dog's breakfast on occasion.)  ):>(

Please let us know how you get along, it might pass along useful info to some others.

Patrick

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Thursday, January 04, 2018 6:44 PM

I find that odd. I'm one that don't like using acrylics but Tamiya's paints I find to be very easy and forgiving to use. They spray VERY smooth and even and are very durable.

Patrick has a good leed on this and it may be your trigger control?

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by D.Savage on Thursday, January 04, 2018 7:42 PM

Matt B

I have always had success with tamiya paint until recently when I began using double action A/B's instead of my old paasche H. Now my paint dries to an almost sandpaper texture. I normally use x20a thinner, but Ive also tried tamiya lacquer thinner to remedy the problem. I use matte colors for all of my paint schemes, so im not sure if that plays a role or not. I dont want to give up on my badger patriot or krome just yet. Is there anything I can do?

 

Matt, 

         I'm no airbrush expert, but I am very experienced with paint. We used to have 4, 30 1gal can mixing machines in the basement for mixing automotive paints  (enamel, lacquer, urethane) etc...

One thing we noticed when switching from old style BINKS siphon fed paint guns to HVLP gravity fed guns, is that we never really saw the need to put the cap on the gravity fed gun the way most airbrushers do with double action brushes.

What I think may be happening is your solvent (alcohol in Tamiyas case) is evaporating in the open air from an uncovered cup, whereas the siphon fed sealed bottle prevents alot of that from happening.

I could be completley wrong, but we experienced the exact same thing only on a bigger scale and with a whole lot more expensive materials/tools sadly.

Try putting the cap on your cup.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:05 PM

As the others have said, it's likely a combination of things like air pressure settings, distance to subject and the viscosity of the paint.

Matt B
I began using double action A/B's instead of my old paasche H

The Paasche H is an external mix airbrush which usually needs a decent volume of airflow to draw the paint from the jar. If you're using the pressure settings that you're used to with the "H" (around 22 PSI?), it's too high. Try around 15-17 PSI and see if it helps.

Another point to consider is the viscosity of the paint. Almost every recommendation I've seen suggests thinning Tamiya acrylics at 2 parts paint to one part thinner. If you're using X-20A thinner, reverse this ratio and use two parts thinner to one part paint. If you're using Tamiya lacquer thinner or Gunze Mr Color Thinner or Leveling Thinner, you can take it further, up to 4 parts thinner to one part paint. Drop the pressure to 12-15 PSI and get up close and personal.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Posted by Matt B on Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:29 PM

Drumsfield, I appreciate the help. Im probably holding my A/B too far from the surface as well then. My paasche was a firehose, so I got used to keeping it at a distance. Its a habit Ive kept. That, along with the light paint release is most likely what has caused this. I did at least get my air pressure correct. I usually spray at the same psi you suggested ever since I started using the gravity feed AB's. Im just going to have to practice and get comfortable with it. Thank you.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Posted by Matt B on Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:43 PM

Greg

Whilst drumsfield is correct in everything he says, I'd bet Patrick probably identified what you are doing (wrong....sorry).

I think pulling slightly back on the trigger is probably a common thing to those new to double-action a/b's. It was for me.

Whatever the cause, your paint is going on too dry and it is not the paint's fault.

You have great advice above from both drumsfield and Patrick. You're going to be fine.

 

I appreciate the words of encouragement. I think Patrick & Drumsfield were pretty dead on about what is going wrong here. Im looking forward to getting this sorted out. I knew there had to be something I could do. 

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Posted by Matt B on Friday, January 05, 2018 4:20 PM

modelmaker66

Air pressure too high and you are too far from the model. It is caused by the paint drying in the air before ir gets to the model. Lower the pressure. Get closer. Thin the paint. Practice a ton. If you still want to sell it drop me a pm. I use one and they are great when you learn what it likes. If you are impatient you will not get the jhang of it.

 

I generally spray in the area of 15 psi. Sometimes lower if im getting close to the surface. Nonetheless, I think I am still keeping the airbrush too far from the model, just as you've suggested. I appreciate the offer, but I dont think I will be getting rid of any of my A/B's anytime soon. I have a certain sentimental attachment to them. I still have alot to learn, but patience is one thing I do have. I originally began doing this as a way to occupy and rehab myself through a brain injury. I can still remember when holding onto the A/B itself was a  frustrating accomplishment. I should be able to overcome this. 

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Posted by Matt B on Friday, January 05, 2018 4:35 PM

plasticjunkie

I find that odd. I'm one that don't like using acrylics but Tamiya's paints I find to be very easy and forgiving to use. They spray VERY smooth and even and are very durable.

Patrick has a good leed on this and it may be your trigger control?

 

I dont believe its the paints fault. I think, as other's have suggested, that my technique has been the cause. I just wasnt sure exactly what it was I had been doing wrong. Im almost sure at this point that my paint release and distance have been the main contributors. Its friday so I will finally have the opportunity to spend some time at my bench and use the next couple of days practicing. Im anxious to see how this works out.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.