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I'm finding Folk Art Metallic paint difficult.

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  • Member since
    April, 2018
I'm finding Folk Art Metallic paint difficult.
Posted by chile1 on Monday, April 23, 2018 6:48 AM

Hi, I'm completely new to airbrushing. I make fishing lures and use an airbrush to paint them. I bought some Folk Art Metallic paint and soon found out that it needs a lot of thinning. This is acrylic paint and I use water distilled water to thin it. I use about 2.5 psi buy no matter how much I thin it it comes out of the airbrush sporadically. I also have some Testors paints which I haven't used yet. Question One:; Can Folk Art metallic actually be used with an airbrush? It has taken almost 2ozs. to cover one lure because I have to sand and repaint time and time again. Question Two:Do I need a white base coat before applying the top paint? I'm finding the entire process very frustrating. Thanks. John

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:14 PM

From what I've been reading up on that particular brand, it appears they're basically an arts and crafts paint. No one here uses such a brand at all. Stick with basic hobby related paimnt brands instead, Use the paint brand's own thinner line before attempting to try cheap alternatives until you get a better understanding in airbrushing.

Yes, a coat of primer is recommended before top coat. my go-to primer is Rustoleum brand dry/wet sandable primer in rattle can. I use either grey, white of even black depending on the subject.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:44 PM

A primer would definitely help. I have seen some folks use craft paint successfully, but I haven't seen the metallics used. Are you spraying other acrylic colors with no issues? Is the metallic mixing well in the cup without clumping? I wonder if the metallic particles are too thick for the brush. I spray Testors enamels with their airbrush thinner myself and can recommend it, just be mindful of the fumes.

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:55 PM
I would also recommend kicking your psi up to 15 to 20 no mater what brand of paint your using.

Clint

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by chile1 on Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:13 AM

Thanks for the advice. I use acrylic paint so fumes are not an issue. I finally got Testors Acrylic metallic to work. I wasn’t thinning it enough and the 1.0 psi is fine.  The paint flows smoothly and consistently now. I let it dry and then polish with a dry towel. It looks great. Best John

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:29 AM

You mention 1.0 and 2.5 PSI. Those pressures are incredibly low and it's doubtful you'd get any sort of paint flow. Do you mean 1.0 and 2.5 bar, perhaps? (14.5 and 36.25 PSI respectively)

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by chile1 on Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:53 AM

Yes, you’re right. I should have written 1.0 bar and 2.5 bar. Its working out fine now. The Testors metallic is just beautiful. Finally, after banging my head against the wall I’m understanding the pressure/viscosity balance. I’m  suddenly enjoying this! Thanks to all for the advice. John

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, April 26, 2018 7:53 AM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

From what I've been reading up on that particular brand, it appears they're basically an arts and crafts paint. No one here uses such a brand at all...

I must respectfully disagree with that statement.  There are many modelers who use craft store acrylics.  If you do a search of the forum on "Americana", "Apple Barrel", and "Folk Art", I expect you'll find posts describing their use.

The advantages of the craft store acrylics are that they can be thinned with water, have no fumes, can be applied by hand or airbrushed, and that they are cheap for the per-unit price.  I use them for weathering, and I've started using them alongside my Andrea and Vallejo acrylics, to paint figures.

Now, there is a disadvantage, and that is that they are craft paints, as you noted.  Their pigments are not ground as finely as those in Andrea or Vallejo paints, or other paints made specifically for scale modelers.  I found that out myself, when I used a craft store acrylic for the underside color on an airplane.  The paint went on well, but the finish was rough, because of the coarser pigments.  However, I've had discussions with other modelers who have said that they didn't notice that effect.  I haven't tried to work around it yet, but I suspect that I might be able to mix a batch and let it settle a little before applying it.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

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  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, April 26, 2018 8:52 AM

Hello!

While that mightr be counter-intuitive, some metallic paints, like the Alclad 2, require black primer to show some effect - sprayed on light surface they only give you slight glitter while on black surface the same amount of paint gives you a defined colour - so maybe this would be worth a try here. Hope it helps and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

PS. Humbrol used to be a craft store paint before modellers started using it

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, April 26, 2018 8:59 AM

the Baron

 

 
BlackSheepTwoOneFour

From what I've been reading up on that particular brand, it appears they're basically an arts and crafts paint. No one here uses such a brand at all...

 

 

I must respectfully disagree with that statement.  There are many modelers who use craft store acrylics.  If you do a search of the forum on "Americana", "Apple Barrel", and "Folk Art", I expect you'll find posts describing their use.

The advantages of the craft store acrylics are that they can be thinned with water, have no fumes, can be applied by hand or airbrushed, and that they are cheap for the per-unit price.  I use them for weathering, and I've started using them alongside my Andrea and Vallejo acrylics, to paint figures.

Now, there is a disadvantage, and that is that they are craft paints, as you noted.  Their pigments are not ground as finely as those in Andrea or Vallejo paints, or other paints made specifically for scale modelers.  I found that out myself, when I used a craft store acrylic for the underside color on an airplane.  The paint went on well, but the finish was rough, because of the coarser pigments.  However, I've had discussions with other modelers who have said that they didn't notice that effect.  I haven't tried to work around it yet, but I suspect that I might be able to mix a batch and let it settle a little before applying it.

 

I also find there is a place for craft store acrylics.  House brands for some of the stores have an incredible number of colors right across the spectrum  If you are doing something different, for which there is no hobby paint available, you may need to mix some  paint.  It is a lot easier to do the mixing when a wide spectrum of colors are available than doing it only from four or five primary colors.  I use Michaels house brand.  I mix it with isopropyl.  Once I found the right mixture ratio, it airbrushes fine.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2012
Posted by Compressorman on Monday, April 30, 2018 10:46 AM

Don Stauffer
 I also find there is a place for craft store acrylics.  House brands for some of the stores have an incredible number of colors right across the spectrum  If you are doing something different, for which there is no hobby paint available, you may need to mix some  paint.  It is a lot easier to do the mixing when a wide spectrum of colors are available than doing it only from four or five primary colors.  I use Michaels house brand.  I mix it with isopropyl.  Once I found the right mixture ratio, it airbrushes fine.

Wow, would never have thought of using alcohol for these types of paint. What advantage does it give over using water?

Chris

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cave City, KY
Posted by Watchmann on Monday, April 30, 2018 6:07 PM

I've used folk art paints in my airbrush, but not the metallic paints.  They may contain particles that help with the metallic sheen, like the old square-bottle testor paints.  After thinning, you may need to strain them through a fine metal mesh to get rid of any lumps before you load it into the airbrush.  Of course, this may remove the metallic effects.

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