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Overthinking Airbrush Air Supply?

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  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Overthinking Airbrush Air Supply?
Posted by Spectre on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:54 PM

After researching airbrush air compressors, I settled on the Sparmax TC-620X. I felt it would offer the best overall value. However, while attempting to place my order with Midwest Airbrush Supply, they informed me that the USA distributor was out of stock and would not receive additional units until May of 2018. Sad So that is when I purchased the Sparmax TC-501N tankless compressor. From my research, this is more or less a dircect copy of the Iwata Smart Jet, with the addtion of a true regulator instead of a bleed valve?

Anyhow, I've yet to hook it up and I'm having serious buyers remorse. I had rationalized this aquisition would be a cost effective means of easing into the hobby and not get $oaked. However, I just cannot get past the fact that it does not have a tank out of my mind.

So, I'm considering returning the compressor to the store and am looking at options, i.e. California Air Tools CAT-2010A or initiating a Crazy Ivan, ref, "The Hunt for Red October",  and renting a CO2 cylinder and purchasing a regulator.

Opinions wanted & welcomed.

Thank you in advance for suffering my anxiety. Confused

 

Cheers

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 5:22 PM
I have an old, noisy walmart 2gal compressor. I would think that all you need is a water trap/moisture filter to make it sing. Maybe someone with some tankless experience will be by to fill us in.
  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 5:49 PM

I have a tankless compressor. I like it just fine. I also have an industrial compressor with a tank for other uses, but it's noisy as hell and I can't use it at night.

I've done the tank thing. Besides releasing all that CO2 which isn't great, the things are a pain to get filled and it adds up pretty quickly.

I'd suggest you read some reviews and consider a high quality, hobby oriented compressor. 

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:42 AM
I have a California air tools compressor best compressor i ever owned it's been going strong for 7 years now plus it's so quite. When it's running you can still talk to someone in the same room with out raising your voice any. I ended up buying a second one to run my nail gun and air hammer in the garage it can handle up to 100psi constant just fine. I urge anyone looking for a compressor to go with a California air tools one, you will love it.

Clint

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:59 AM

I've been a CO2 fan for a long time.  I generally fill the 10lb tank every 2 years or so.  It is a bummer when you run out on Saturday night, but planning ahead helps.  No noise, consistent pressure finely adjustable pressure (with a good regulator) and no condensation.  My 2 cents

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Thursday, April 26, 2018 5:44 AM

Rambo
I have a California air tools compressor best compressor i ever owned it's been going strong for 7 years now plus it's so quite. When it's running you can still talk to someone in the same room with out raising your voice any. I ended up buying a second one to run my nail gun and air hammer in the garage it can handle up to 100psi constant just fine. I urge anyone looking for a compressor to go with a California air tools one, you will love it.

Rambo, which models do you own?
 
Thank you & Cheers Mate
 
Spectre
  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Thursday, April 26, 2018 5:53 AM

keavdog

I've been a CO2 fan for a long time.  I generally fill the 10lb tank every 2 years or so.  It is a bummer when you run out on Saturday night, but planning ahead helps.  No noise, consistent pressure finely adjustable pressure (with a good regulator) and no condensation.  My 2 cents

Wow, two years, Keavdog? Surprise
How much actual airbrush time does this option afford you? I'm very intrigued by this option, it's looking very viable.
 
Thanks & Cheers Mate
 
Spectre
  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:36 AM
The 2010a

Clint

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, April 26, 2018 9:07 AM

I use a tankless Iwata compressor, and I like it.  It is so quiet!  It does have a slight pulsation, but at a very high frequency.  That pulsation has never showed up in a finish.  I suppose if you move the brush at a high enough speed you might, but I have never had trouble with that.

Only trouble at first was that I could only get about 18 psi max.  Since I usually spray at 15, this was not a big problem, but I do sometimes like to go up to 20 on some flats.  Then, I thought of something.  I had not used teflon tape on the compressor output fitting.  I wrapped the fitting, and now can get 25, though I never use that high of a pressure.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:38 PM

Rambo
The 2010a
 

Are you running in conjuntion with a secondary regulator + moisture trap at your bench or just a moisture trap directly at the tank?
 
Cheers Mate
 
Spectre
  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:58 PM

Why not look at the Iwata Power Jet Pro? I have one and it's a great compressor. It has auto-shutoff and a tank. Which is the main reason why I bought it. I also own the Smart Jet with bleed valve which isn't bad when paired with a seperate MAC valve control just below the airbrush quick connect.

One thing I love about the Power Jet Pro is it's so quiet and never seems to loose air. I could leave it off for days and it would still have enough air in it that it doesn't need to restart the motor untill after I start using it. It's also go rock solid resale value if you ever decide to sell it. As for me I'm keeping mine forever. My Smart Jet will be given to my kids eventually and used as a portable kit until then. BTW You can buy the Iwata Power Jet for about $425... which is cheaper than the Sparmax.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:02 PM

I've done about 25 or so models and helped my wife with her dollhouse since my last refill and I'm about due again.  I could stretch the co2 if I chose a different cleaning method. I spray lacquer thinner through it to clean. 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Thursday, April 26, 2018 8:50 PM

Spectre

 

 
Rambo
The 2010a
 

 

Are you running in conjuntion with a secondary regulator + moisture trap at your bench or just a moisture trap directly at the tank?
 
Cheers Mate
 
Spectre
 

I keep it under my spray booth and have the regulator on the tank set at 45psi then a line ran up attached to a moisture trap and another regulator that I set between 15 to 20psi.

Clint

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by CharleyGnarlyP290 on Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:40 AM
I'll second the CO2 thing. I have been using it for quite a while now, and doubt I will ever go with a compressor again. No noise, no moisture problems... works like a champ.
  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Saturday, May 05, 2018 1:23 PM

drumsfield

Why not look at the Iwata Power Jet Pro?

<snip>

BTW You can buy the Iwata Power Jet for about $425... which is cheaper than the Sparmax.

 

 
Where are you getting your price for the Iwata Power Jet Pro?
  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Saturday, May 05, 2018 1:28 PM

keavdog

I've done about 25 or so models and helped my wife with her dollhouse since my last refill and I'm about due again.  I could stretch the co2 if I chose a different cleaning method. I spray lacquer thinner through it to clean. 

 

What is the "sweet spot" psi range and the maximum effective psi range at which you can operate?

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, May 05, 2018 2:40 PM

I do most work between 12 and 20 PSI.  I've never cranked it up so not sure of the max, but I'm sure it's up there!  Looking at one diver site, a guy filled a 10lb tank and read 900psi

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by GraemeT on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:14 PM
I am pretty sure Sparmax sells tanks that are pretty much a plug and play addition.
  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 10:13 PM

Great thread, thank y'all for for the learned input. I decided on the California Air Tools 1P1060S. I can' wait to experiment with this compresor.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, May 25, 2018 5:12 PM

Didn't want to run out of CO2 over the long weekend so I went and had my 10lb tank filled - $30.00 at my local welding supply store.  Just wanted to close out my comments. 

How is the compressor working?

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • From: Louisiana, USA
Posted by Spectre on Sunday, May 27, 2018 7:19 AM

Kevdog,

So far, so good with my compressor.

Thanks for asking.

Cheers

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