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water trap?

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  • Member since
    February, 2018
  • From: Va, USA
water trap?
Posted by JJFlyer on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 12:54 PM

hello,

i have been airbrushing for a short time but i have heard alot about a water trap and i want to know if i need one, i have a torpedo shop compressor and a paacshe h.

Thanks for any help,

JJflyer

current projects:

1/48 monogram b29

1/48 revell sbd1 dauntless

 

on deck:

1/48 revell bf109g10

1/48 Tamiya f4u-1d 

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 2:45 PM

Hi, JJ -

Even though the moisture content of compressed air is somewhat minor, I think it could well have some negative results in sprayed paint. I have always used a moisture separator, combined with a water trap. When I open the drain on my compressor after extended spray sessions, I do see a mist of moisture come out. When I open the drain on the water trap, I see a couple of drops come out.

When I lay the water separator element on a paper towel, there is a very slight amount of moisture that absorbs on the towel, just a trace. The moisture separator is between the water trap and airbrush. The moisture separator is probably overkill, but you surely couldn't go wrong by using a water trap.

Patrick

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 3:54 PM

My setup is a pressure regulator, a red "pumpkin" water trap ($2 at HF, or from the local auto parts store), then my AB hose.  This is all on a quick disconnect so I can plug it into an air hose at either the shop or at home.

Works fine.  You will get some moisture, and possibly a hint of oil (in not an "oil-less" compressor) without a final trap.  May be overkill, but for the cost, pretty good insurance.

 

The pumpkin filters are 1/4 NPT, so are a snap to stick one between your final pressure regulator and your adapter to the AB hose, or regulator and quick disconnect to the compressor.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 3:54 PM

A must-have.

The moisture content of the air in your tank is a result of the moisture content in the surrounding air.

Theres no barrier to moisture on the inlet side of your compressor.

Also as Patrick noted, draining the tank is very important. Otherwise accumulated water will rust the tank, possibly leading to a rupture.

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 7:39 PM

I guess I am very fortunate.  Here in Colorado, the relative humidity is always very low, and I have never seen a drop of moisture in my water trap.  I suppose in Florida, things would be different.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Thursday, May 10, 2018 1:32 AM

Way back when I was using a compressor it was mandetory.  Mine was tankless and without it I'd get water splotches on my model... really irritating.  Fast forward to C02 (yes I'm a C02 fan) zero issues.  Nothing but a tank and a regulator.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    February, 2018
  • From: Va, USA
Posted by JJFlyer on Friday, May 11, 2018 6:50 AM

would a fuel filter work?

current projects:

1/48 monogram b29

1/48 revell sbd1 dauntless

 

on deck:

1/48 revell bf109g10

1/48 Tamiya f4u-1d 

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Friday, May 11, 2018 8:57 AM

No, fuel filters are designed to let fluids through, and just trap dirt and particulates.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, May 11, 2018 9:20 AM

$ 10, worth it.

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Friday, May 11, 2018 11:52 AM

On a related note. What do you guys think about a watertrap right below the airbrush? Overkill? I have one that came with my Iwata but I've never seen moisture inside so I took it off because with the mac bleed valve and quick release my setup was begining to get long.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Friday, May 11, 2018 11:58 AM

Might make it tight to get close enough to do fine line work, depending on the filter.  Haven't had any problems with it at the compressor end of the AB hose.  By then it has cooled enough to let moisture drop out in the trap there.

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by GraemeT on Thursday, May 17, 2018 2:48 AM
You can get regulators with built in water traps.
  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Caveman on Thursday, May 17, 2018 7:29 PM

For the low price of a trap you can't go wrong.  There is no downside to having one in your system.  There is a huge downside to getting a drop of water in your paintwork.  I personally have a regulator with a trap as well as an inline trap just before the airbrush.  Overkill is under rated in my opinion.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, May 17, 2018 10:14 PM

Caveman

 Overkill is under rated in my opinion.

 

First you kill them, then go to work on them.

Yep, water in the paint is no good.

I live in a pretty humid environment, about a mile from the ocean.

  • Member since
    February, 2018
  • From: Va, USA
Posted by JJFlyer on Friday, May 18, 2018 6:57 AM

I live in central VA would a pumpkin water trap solve most of my problems?

current projects:

1/48 monogram b29

1/48 revell sbd1 dauntless

 

on deck:

1/48 revell bf109g10

1/48 Tamiya f4u-1d 

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