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Trying to mottle without spidering

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  • Member since
    April, 2018
Trying to mottle without spidering
Posted by Oxboy on Sunday, May 20, 2018 7:04 PM

I watched tons of vids on the technique called mottling or marbling so I wanted to give it a try.  I got my brand new (and clean) Neo TRN1, set it to 10 psi and put the trigger lock about a quarter of the way open.  The nozzle is .35 by the way.

Got out some Tamiya flat white, thinned it 2 tamiya laq thinner:1 paint and tried to mottle.  Seem to start ok at about 3/8 to 1/2" away, but then it started spidering within a nano-second of getting the nozzle close to the surface.  I tried:

  1. playing with PSI between 15 and 8
  2. adjusting the trigger lock a little
  3. adding a little more paint because the spidering looked pretty watery
  4. constantly cleaning the needle with lacquer thinner + the iwata brush from the cleaning kit

I know white probably wasn't the best choice, but the inconsistency with my airbrush initiation continues.  I just had no idea that these things could be so *** finicky.

Do I need a smaller nozzle/needle combo for tight in work??  Suggestions?

Thanks all!  Yes

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, May 20, 2018 7:17 PM

Is this your first airbrush?

-Greg

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by Oxboy on Sunday, May 20, 2018 7:26 PM

yep

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Sunday, May 20, 2018 7:56 PM
Never have used one of them pistol grip airbrushes before but here's what I do for my iwata eclipse. Tamiya paint thinned with their thinner to about 70% thinner to 30% paint. Air at 15psi. And practice practice practice and practice until you get the hang of it. Also work close I sometimes take the cap off the needle so I can get closer

Clint

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, May 20, 2018 7:58 PM

Fair enough. Here's why I ask:

Mottling is really difficult and I sure don't want to sound condencending because you are obviously a sharp guy and I think you can probably do any darned thing you put your mind to.

But I think you should take a little time to get the feel of airbrushing before you jump into mottling.

That said, here's a few ideas.....

Acrylics are harder to mottle with. The way you gotta do it makes dry tip worse. Tamiya might be a decent acrylic choice, though.

Someone is bound to say your .35mm needle is too big for mottling. I would like to disagree in advance.

I'd advise against setting the needle-stop. When mottling, you do it by feel. I've heard it said that needle-stops are useless when spraying acrylic due to the dry tip issue yet again, and becuase the stop keeps changing. I tend to agree.

If you really must mottle with acrylics, I've heard Gunze Aqueous can be a good choice. I've pulled it off with Vallejo once. Sadly, I'd given up drinking prior to that, which was, in hindsight, a mistake probably.

I'm going to shut up now. Take your time. Even after you've been airbrushing for years, I'll bet there'll be times you want to launch the thing out a window. I do. I hope you take your time and have fun.

Edit: just reviewed my post. I'm sorry, I didn't set out to write a ramble.

-Greg

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by Oxboy on Sunday, May 20, 2018 8:14 PM

Not condescending or rambling.  I'm still a babe in the woods.  I appreciate any and all comments or advice.  I'm going to try a few tweaks like using a drop or 2 of tamiya paint retarder.  Maybe i'll spring for some of the Mr Color thinner and paint to test out.  

Thanks all.

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by Oxboy on Sunday, May 20, 2018 8:15 PM

Rambo
thinned with their thinner to about 70% thinner 

 

Rambo, is that lacquer thinner or X-20A ?

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Sunday, May 20, 2018 8:20 PM
X-20a

Clint

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, May 21, 2018 12:16 PM

Whew, I'm glad my post didn't offend. It was too pushy.

Been giving this some thought, if you want to experiment, then by golly you should. I think the main thing in starting would be getting the thinning right. If you are getting spiders, you are either

a) too thin (wet)

b) too close

c) too much pressure

Keep messing with it and you'll get it.

Another thing I thought of, even the best mottlers here speak of spaying over boo-boos. That's one of the good things about mottling, you can.

And I forgot to say .....Have fun with the new airbrush!!!

-Greg

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Monday, May 21, 2018 4:44 PM
Thinking about this to me it sounds like you might be trying to put the spot down in one go. Work close and slow and build up your mottling in multiple light coats like you would painting anything else. Hope this gives you some ideas.

Clint

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by Oxboy on Monday, May 21, 2018 4:53 PM

What a difference a day makes!  I took all your guys' advice and did some things today:

  • added a little retarder...I think it helped
  • took off the needle stop...it's like trying to drive with the parking brake on...good call to remove it.
  • got in really close and just barely pulled the trigger...worked it really slow

The one thing to work on is the sudden epileptic seizure that causes a spider.  You're going good than you get the tiniest muscle twitch and out comes the spider.  Oh well..that is probably a constant occupational hazard. Smile   At least it's easy to just paint over.

Again, thank you for all the advice!!

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Monday, May 21, 2018 6:21 PM
Great to hear the number one thing is practice you'll find what works best for you.

Clint

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, May 21, 2018 7:12 PM

Rambo
Thinking about this to me it sounds like you might be trying to put the spot down in one go. Work close and slow and build up your mottling in multiple light coats like you would painting anything else. Hope this gives you some ideas.
 

That is good advice, spot on, Clint.

I'm glad to hear you are having some success, oxboy. Happy news indeed. Got me thinking even on my best mottling job so far I had what you describe and had a few paint-overs.

-Greg

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