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Trying a wooden ship for time ever. A few questions about primer and paint?

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  • Member since
    July, 2007
Trying a wooden ship for time ever. A few questions about primer and paint?
Posted by tachikawa on Saturday, June 16, 2018 10:24 PM

I've never tried an all wooden ship model. I bought a 'beginner' plank-on-plank kit from Artesiana Latina. Was wondering about what kind of primer and paint to use?

Usually on plastic kits I use Plastikote sandible Primer, gray T-235, in a spray can. Then I use all kinds of paints, acrylics, lacquers, enamels, metalizers depending on what color I need. 

So what kind/brand of primer will work well to cover wood?

Which kind/brand of paint will work well over primed wood? Acrylics?

 

I appreciate any help you all can give me!

 

 

TIA!

Glenn

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, June 16, 2018 11:11 PM

Any good sandable primer will work. Zinser is good, Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore are too. If the subject is a wood ship, go light because you don't want to fill the grain.

  • Member since
    July, 2007
Posted by tachikawa on Saturday, June 16, 2018 11:21 PM

Thanks for the info!

 

Glenn

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, June 16, 2018 11:24 PM

I brush paint. So color coats again can be higher quality paint store stuff. Arcylic is fine, just keep it thin. I prefer enamels.

What's your model? AL models can be all over the place. 

Welcome to wood ship models.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2007
Posted by tachikawa on Saturday, June 16, 2018 11:33 PM

The kit is the New England Whaleboat Providence.

 

Glenn

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, June 16, 2018 11:58 PM

Following.  I would like to do a wooden ship kit as well.  What is a good quality novice kit? 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    July, 2007
Posted by tachikawa on Sunday, June 17, 2018 8:21 AM

I'm thinking something small, with a single mast or even no mast at all. Certainly not some 3 or 4 masted huge ship of the line which would probably overwhelm you or me! Something that's not really expensive either, so if you don't finish it for whatever reason there's not a  lot of money sitting there gathering dust.

 

My 2 cents...

 

Glenn

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Sunday, June 17, 2018 8:47 AM

I used Tamiya neutral gray as a primer and Tamita acrylics airbrushed on.Worked just fine!

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, June 17, 2018 11:03 AM

Model Expo sells a line of models made by Model Shipways. They are one of the few wooden ship model companies still going. I recommend what you suggested. Start with something manageable.

The Phantom Pilot Boat is available as a solid hull. It’s very handsome when finished.

Wooden model ship kits come in several basic forms. Solid hull is just that. The blank is shaped and usually can be built as is, or cleaned up a little should you choose. The builder adds deck planks, keel and rudder. Bulwark rail caps.

The other type, with variations, is plank on bulkhead or plank on frame. The kit supplies a series of inner structural pieces laser cut from sheet, or to be cut from patterns. Once you assemble those, planks are added in several layers. It takes some experience and the right set up to get those right.

I really suggest anyone without a fair amount of experience steer clear of any complicated subject. And in particular those big European ship kits- they have very rocky reputations and require a lot of work. HECEPOBs Tilley would say- hideously expensive Central European plank on bulkheads. Fabulous stuff when done well but very challenging.

I confess a complete bias for relatively large scale models of fishing schooners, sloops of war, little brigs. Even a solid hull kit can be sheathed if wanted.

When you open the box, you’ll see a shaped hull blank and a lot of straight dowels and wood strips. Plus some metal castings. And thread.

A skill that you need is to be able to build from drawings. Most kits from Model Shipways or Blue Jacket come with very good ones.

This discussion belongs in Ships to be more useful to you.

Theres a really swell build there of schooner Bluenose, exactly what I’m trying to describe but most instructive as a build.

I do not share the enthusiasm for Tamiya paints on wood. They don’t have a sanding primer, and paint that wet will lift the grain. But it works for some I guess and give some different paints tests on scrap.

Good luck!

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, June 17, 2018 11:15 AM

One choice you have to make is, do you want the model to end up faithful to scale, or a piece of art.

Some people like to finish wood models in stains and varnishes (even those whose prototypes were painted).  In this case you do not need to prime.  The results are beautiful, but not perfectly realistic if the prototype were painted.  This is particularly common in those kits that supply some fancy, rare woods for the planking.

I know there are purists that do not accept one philosophy or the other, but I think it is the builder's choice, and both ideas can produce great models. 

Even if you wish to paint it authentically, priming the woods used in model ship kits do not absolutely have to be primed, unless the prototype was made of metal.  Then, priming and filling of grain are required (or else more coats of paint, sanding between coats) are required than most of us are willing to do.  However, just about any kind of prime will work for that first coat.  I have used thinned varnish (50/50) mix with good results as a sanding sealer, and go on from there.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, June 17, 2018 11:30 AM

I disagree using Tamiya paints as primer. It won’t show much detail in wooden ship hulls. I’d stick with an alternative type of paint specifically for wood.

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Sunday, June 17, 2018 5:51 PM

Well in the case of sailing ships,the hull consists of bent wooden planks so there is no detail to obscurelResults were excellent with Tamiya paints!  

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Sunday, June 17, 2018 5:56 PM

Works well with solid hull ships like my Scientific Sark!    

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