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new to airbrush need help

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  • Member since
    May, 2018
new to airbrush need help
Posted by floydtn on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 4:29 PM

I keep having texture and a ruff feel in my paint. What can cause this? i primed with tamiya primer using tamiya acrylic thinned with there thinner. passche h at 20psi. thanks  for any info

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Great Southern Land
Posted by damouav on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 4:42 PM

Try adjusting the air pressure, try at different distances from the subject and do this all on an unwanted plastic container. just for good measure run some of the thinners through the AB to clean any residue out. The basic reason is the paint is drying before it hits the surface, this can also be attributed to over and under thinning the paint or having the AB to far from the surface.

A mositure trap in humid and hot locations can also help, I use two, one on the comprssor and another on the AB.

Good luck!

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  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 5:09 PM

There are several things that will cause a rough finish. A bent needle or clogged tip will do it, as will  too thick paint or having the paint dry before hitting the surface.

How much did you thin the paint? How close to the surface did you hold the AB? What is the approx. temperature and humidity in your spray area?

Generally, the paint needs to be thinned with an equal quanitity of thinner, i.e., a 1:1 ratio, but in hot weather sometimes more thinner is required. If (when) I have the same problem I start by checking the needle and tip, use thinner paint, and vary the distance and pressure up and down until I see better results.

Hope something I said will help!

Mike

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, July 04, 2018 10:43 AM

This may be off-base, but my Paasche h was circa 1970-something and I finally parted ways with it a couple years ago. It was in extremely bad shape from neglect, no fault of the Paasche, just bad on me.

So I have to wonder, is your Paasche h in good condition? Mike touched on this briefly above.

Airbrushing can be a real hair-puller, and having an airbrush in less than like-new condition can throw one more variable into the mix you don't need.

Glad to hear you are using a tried and true paint (tamiya) and their own thinner. Hope you get this sorted soon.

 

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Wednesday, July 04, 2018 2:28 PM

Great ideas from all above. If you're certain the business end of the AB is clean and in good physical condition, then my suggestion is to get a supply of thinners and paint, then as was said get plenty of plastic to paint on, then experiment with different thinning ratios and pressures, plus distance between the AB and surface to be painted.

When spray painting, one of the most critical elements is lighting. A poorly lit space for spraying is an invitation for unwanted results.

The old saying about beginning with airbrush painting is to practice, practice and then practice some more. My first attempts at airbrushing, using an AB similar to your H were terribly disappointing, and I was not seeing any improvements as I continued. I seriously thought I was just not able and was resigned to brush painting.

My stubborn Irish side said "just get with it." So I get a bunch of plastic sheets and large jugs, then spent most of an afternoon spraying out several bottles of model paints. In time I saw what worked well, and even more important what didn't work.

Cleaning of the airbrush after use is one of the most critical parts of spray painting, I know many folks consider a rinse spray to be good enough, in my experience it just isn't sufficient. When you're through it's easy enough to remove the front parts and the bottle feed tube to the AB, then give them a thorough cleaning and reassemble. Just a very few bits of dried paint left inside the parts, will have a disastrous effect on future spray jobs.

Also, as you spray, keep an eye on the sharp pointed needle end, a q-tip and some thinner will clean any drying material there with just a quick swipe. If the paint does dry there it will cause spitting of little droplets and spots getting on the surface you're painting.

Last, if you haven't yet by all means have a look at "Don's Airbrush" site, listed as that on Google. There is info on your H, plus all other things related to airbrushing. Very well worth the time.

Let us know how you make out, if you have the time.

Patrick

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, July 05, 2018 8:24 AM

I tend to get roughness most often with too high a pressure and too much distance from model.  The paint dries on the way to the surface, and does not self level.  Dial the paint flow back a bit and get closer to surface.  You do not need a whole lot of pressure for most paints.

One important thing is to think of an airbrush as a brush that puts down brushmark-less paint, not as a mini-spray gun.  Cover small areas, overlap a lot, and go slowly.  Airbrushing does not necessarily go faster than a manual brush, but makes a much nicer finish.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Thursday, July 05, 2018 1:41 PM

Don Stauffer

I tend to get roughness most often with too high a pressure and too much distance from model.  The paint dries on the way to the surface, and does not self level.  Dial the paint flow back a bit and get closer to surface.  You do not need a whole lot of pressure for most paints.

One important thing is to think of an airbrush as a brush that puts down brushmark-less paint, not as a mini-spray gun.  Cover small areas, overlap a lot, and go slowly.  Airbrushing does not necessarily go faster than a manual brush, but makes a much nicer finish.

 

 

That is truly some of the wisest and most well spoken advice on airbrushing I have ever heard. Thanks.

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Thursday, July 05, 2018 6:26 PM

This is very odd. I find that tamiya acrylics spray pretty much like enamels. I have never had this issue with Tamiya paints. I thin mine about 40% paint and 60% Tamiya thinner and spray about 12-15 PSI 3 to 4 inches from the surface and get very good smooth coverage. As mentioned above, experiment with different mix ratios and distances. Also use another paint bottle just in case the one before is bad.

  

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

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