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Fully enclosed spray booth

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  • Member since
    October, 2011
Fully enclosed spray booth
Posted by radcontech on Saturday, September 01, 2018 7:24 PM

I am thinking about buying/building a spray booth that is fully enclosed. My thought is that it would be built so that there would be arm sleeves to allow my arms in or even have gloves that would only allow fingers through. I really don't like wearing a respirator and if it was fully enclosed with a negative ventilation to the outside I would be seperated from the fumes. 

I'm wondering if anyone has seen or built anything like this?

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Saturday, September 01, 2018 10:29 PM
So like a sandblaster booth, it wouldn't be that hard to make but awful hard to see what your doing while painting.

Clint

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 02, 2018 12:14 AM

I built one many years ago and I still use it. It does minimize fumes. And, I think it helps to reduce dust inside of the booth.

When I first built it I used latex gloves that I glued to the inside front panel. You'd put your hands in from the outside through holes in the front panel. Over time, I got frustrated with the lack of reach inside the booth. So, I cut the hands off the gloves and left the sleeves. I still put my arms through those holes, and what remains of the rubber sleeves provides enough of a seal as is goes over my arms.

Works well for me.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 02, 2018 12:30 AM

PS: Panels of the booth are clear plexyglas. So, I have no issues seeing in. Even the top is clear. I have a hanging light just above, and with it being clear, it allows light to enter. Everything I needed was purchased through a hardware store. It is crude construction, but it works.

Good luck with however you go.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Sunday, September 02, 2018 6:18 AM
I just think unless your spraying 8 hrs a day,every day,or you really can't afford to have any fumes at all in your work area,it seems to be overkill,especially with acrylics being more and more the norm.I know for the amount of spraying I do,it's a bit much. But if it's what you require go for it.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 02, 2018 10:06 AM

Tojo72
I just think unless your spraying 8 hrs a day,every day,or you really can't afford to have any fumes at all in your work area,it seems to be overkill,especially with acrylics being more and more the norm.I know for the amount of spraying I do,it's a bit much. But if it's what you require go for it.

Hi Tojo! I know you are addressing that to the OP. Hopefully, he will respond with his reasons for considering this. I just want to add a few points here because there can be some extenuating circumstances for doing it. I am speaking from my experience, and why I had gone to this extreme.

Many years ago I lived with my girlfriend in a small two bedroom apartment, and I had decided that I want to build models again. The issue at hand was, my girlfriend has asthma, and she has allergies to all sorts of fuming. How do I adequately vent not only the fumes, but the paint particulates? I had to take all the precautions I could, for her sake. This is why, in my case, I went to this extreme.

Today, I live in a much roomier condo, and the girlfriend is no longer with me. As fate would have it though...I developed the same sort of maladies. I am boderline asthmatic, and I have developed a fairly severe sensitivity to fumes. At times, it is almost debilitating. Even though I have the ability to use a closed system, I often wouldn't. I felt that my exhaust fan was handling it, and that my short exposures will not cause any issues. During a few extended paint sessions with the front panel open I happend to notice that clouds of paint particles were blowing back towards me. My exhaust system was not producing enough draw. Evidence of this was seen when I blew my nose. When it looks the color of what you were spraying...  you know there is an issue. I had used one of them cheap surgical masks, but those don't do much at all. Anyway, I ignored the issue. This last Fall I was spraying laquer based paint and it was one of them longer paint sessions. I got a good dose that day. A month later I was stricken with a pretty severe case of bronchitis. It was one where I teetered on having to go on short term disability. Maybe it was the bug that was going around but... in my heart of hearts, I knew that I had weakened my immunity. Having allergies is an immunity problem and exposure to chemicals only weakens a person. Since then, I have added another exaust fan, and that has improved the air draw a lot. For now, I will continue to spray with the front panel closed. I can't afford to take that health risk.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, September 02, 2018 11:09 AM

In the interest of adding to the dicsussion (when are airbrush concerns overkill?), I'd like to add my story.

Around 2011, my current wife, then girlfriend moved in with me. That Christmas, her son bought me my first model kit in 40 yrs, and a work area downstairs, complete with airbrush(es) followed shortly.

I used an old box, unvented, as a makeshift booth.

In late 2016, my wife was diagnosed with lung cancer**. I haven't done much building since. I'll never know if my spraying and her illness were connected, they probably were not. But until I get off my butt and come up with a safer solution, I do very little airbrushing, hence very little building.

Just as Tojo mentioned, I too don't worry much about little acryic spray jobs, I do worry about oil-based gloss coats and such, though. I used to worry about blowing up the furnace. Now it's lungs.

I only mention this becuase at first read, the OP's solution seemed a bit of overkill to me too, then I read Steve's story, and thought of my own.

So I second both Tojo and Steve, if your conditions warrant it, go for it. Maybe Steve could even offer tips if you build one.

2 cents

** the cancer was detected extremely early, and short version is my wife is fine. We were extremely fortunate, and my hat is off to the surgeons and  staff at Rush Medical Center Chicago.  .....and to her family Doc for taking her cough seriously enough to order an x-ray. Saved her life.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Sunday, September 02, 2018 11:29 AM
Off course thats the caveat,everyone has their individual cirmcumstances that dictate how much they must protect themselves,I usually strap on my mask when priming with the rattlecan,and vacate the area for a little.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, September 02, 2018 11:32 AM

If you have the room to build one, by all mean build it. FWIW.... a waste of time if you're not spraying 8 hours a day straight.

Spring, summer (except when it's humid outdoors) and fall (on decent cool or warm days), I do most of my airbrushing in my garage with door and windows open. Wintertime I use my airbrush booth with vent vented out to cellar window. Worked for me...

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, September 02, 2018 12:39 PM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

If you have the room to build one, by all mean build it. FWIW.... a waste of time if you're not spraying 8 hours a day straight.

Spring, summer (except when it's humid outdoors) and fall (on decent cool or warm days), I do most of my airbrushing in my garage with door and windows open. Wintertime I use my airbrush booth with vent vented out to cellar window. Worked for me...

 

I agree with that. Venting through a filter is not difficult, and keeps overspray clouds off your other stuff.

When I first saw this thread, I pictured a painter in a paper suit in a room, wearing a respirator and using a gun to paint a sign.

It sounds like it's possible, but I have a hard time understanding how you'd keep the window into the booth clean.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 02, 2018 1:25 PM

GMorrison
It sounds like it's possible, but I have a hard time understanding how you'd keep the window into the booth clean.

Bill--it's not a problem. I may be stating the obvious, but the booth must be vented. Spraying in a closed environment with no exhaust would lead to one big mess. My exhaust is in the back of my booth and that pulls the overspray away from the model, and the window. I never have to clean the window. Even when my ventilation system was inadequate, I had no problems. It works very well. And I tell ya--it limits the amount of fumes that enters my basement, and the house, no matter what. I typically can't even smell the fumes when in a closed configuration. That is why I don't even need to use a respirator. If I would migrate over to use a respirator only, with the booth configured open--the fumes build up in the basement. I know this from trying it. Sure, I am not breathing it as I spray, but what about later? In winter months the heating system draws those fumes throughout the whole house. The same is true when the air-conditioning kicks in in the summer months. I can smell it for many hours after as it's being forced through the ducting. Using acrylics is not the issue. It's when spraying enamels and lacquers is where it gets bad. Even with cleaning the brush using lacquer is enough to fumigate the place. But then again--because of my lowered immunity--I am more sensitive to it. For people with strong immunities... it's just another day in the park.

 PS: I failed to mentiuon that the venting is directed out into my garage via dedicated ducting.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 02, 2018 1:30 PM

Greg
I'll never know if my spraying and her illness were connected, they probably were not.

Greg--I highly doubt this was the cause. BUT--you were wise to stop for her sake because smelling breathing those fumes could have irritated the lining of her lungs making her feel uncomfortable. 

Greg
Maybe Steve could even offer tips if you build one.

I'd be happy to, if needed.

Greg
* the cancer was detected extremely early, and short version is my wife is fine. We were extremely fortunate, and my hat is off to the surgeons and  staff at Rush Medical Center Chicago.  .....and to her family Doc for taking her cough seriously enough to order an x-ray. Saved her life.

And thank goodness for that.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, September 02, 2018 4:08 PM

Thanks for your kind words, Steve.

I was standing in the shower at the gym a while ago realising I posted way too much info here in this thread. My bad, sorry.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 02, 2018 6:26 PM

My Friend--you forget who you are talking to. You are talking to one of the KINGs of posting too much info. BTW--I liked what you wrote. So, NO REGRETS! Got it?

“Anti-quitsies, you're it, quitsies, no anti-quitsies, no ”startsies! (Name that movie)

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, September 02, 2018 7:25 PM

Thanks Mr. Steve.

-Greg

  • Member since
    October, 2011
Posted by radcontech on Monday, September 03, 2018 11:35 AM

I'd like to thank everyone for their input, especially Baxter and Greg. I have the room to build a nice booth, I'm thinking about 4 foot long and will vent it directly outside. I really don't like the idea of fumes inside because I don't like wearing a mask and even if I do I have pets. The dog has a blanket she drags around and will lay on it on the floor next to me while modeling. I certainly don't want her to be hurt or worse yet Gregs story concerns me. 

 

In about a month the wife is going on an extended trip to see the kids in college and I think I will build it then. It might be an overkill but I have a tendency to do that, I'm an engineer.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, September 03, 2018 11:47 AM

radcontech

I'd like to thank everyone for their input, especially Baxter and Greg. I have the room to build a nice booth, I'm thinking about 4 foot long and will vent it directly outside. I really don't like the idea of fumes inside because I don't like wearing a mask and even if I do I have pets. The dog has a blanket she drags around and will lay on it on the floor next to me while modeling. I certainly don't want her to be hurt or worse yet Gregs story concerns me. 

 

In about a month the wife is going on an extended trip to see the kids in college and I think I will build it then. It might be an overkill but I have a tendency to do that, I'm an engineer.

 

You're welcome.

Once you get to building your booth, it would make a great project to post here as a WIP. Hint, hint.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, September 03, 2018 12:02 PM

This is my booth. It uses a Dayton 1TDR3 blower mounted to the back of the booth's lower plenum box.. It  exhausts 273 CFM and the electric motor is not in the path of the exhaust air. There is a switch box mounted to the side of the plenum. The top of the booth is made from a storage box that I purchased at IKEA, The bottom is made from MDF boards from Home Depot. I can lift off the top of the booth to change the filter. The blower exhausts to the outside of the house via a 6" dryer duct. I never smell any paint fumes when I use the booth. The storage box came with a plastic cover. When I am finished painting I attach the cover to prevent dust from entering the booth. 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Monday, September 03, 2018 2:19 PM

radcontech
I'd like to thank everyone for their input, especially Baxter and Greg.

You are welcome. You won't regret it. Why breath air filled with chemicals if you don't have to. 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2011
Posted by radcontech on Monday, September 03, 2018 2:36 PM

Greg

 

You're welcome.

Once you get to building your booth, it would make a great project to post here as a WIP. Hint, hint.

 

 

I'll definately post the project here but probably not until I'm done due to the fact that I have a tendancy to restart projects a couple times because I don't like how they are turning out. For ventilation I am thinking I will use two bilge blowers (due to being explosion proof) with seperate power and adjustable speed so that I have fine control over how many and speed of blowers. It will be a down draft booth on lockable wheels so that I an move it around the room as necessary. 

I think it's time to start drawing up plans. I'm thinking I can do the whole things for under 400 dollars. 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, September 04, 2018 11:15 AM

radcontech

 

 
Greg

 

You're welcome.

Once you get to building your booth, it would make a great project to post here as a WIP. Hint, hint.

 

 

 

 

I'll definately post the project here but probably not until I'm done due to the fact that I have a tendancy to restart projects a couple times because I don't like how they are turning out. For ventilation I am thinking I will use two bilge blowers (due to being explosion proof) with seperate power and adjustable speed so that I have fine control over how many and speed of blowers. It will be a down draft booth on lockable wheels so that I an move it around the room as necessary. 

I think it's time to start drawing up plans. I'm thinking I can do the whole things for under 400 dollars. 

 

 

 

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