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Dull Cote causing frosting?

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  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: Michigan
Dull Cote causing frosting?
Posted by Straycat1911 on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 5:42 PM

So I’m working on the missiles for my Tamiya F-14, got them all decaled and went to spray them with Dullcote before mounting them. 

Checked on them a few minutes later and EEEK! They looked like Jack Nicholson in the last scene of The Shining! Lol! 

Wiped em down and I’m gonna try again. Used Model Master rattle can for the Flat Gull gray body color and Gunmetal from the bottle for the fins. 

Only thing I can think of is I didn’t shake the can before I sprayed. 

Ideas? 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 6:09 PM

My guess is can was too far away, paint dried before it got to the surface.

I've done this a few times with various flat clear coats using an airbrush.

Years ago Stikpusher taught me a neat trick. Lay down a wet coat of gloss over the frosting, it should clear it up and when dry you can try again with the flat. Stik's trick has saved me more than once. Seems counterintuitive to lay down a gloss coat over flat, but it works.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: Michigan
Posted by Straycat1911 on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 6:15 PM

Sounds like a plan to keep in mind for the future but I just tried it again with the can getting a good shaking and it turned out a lot better. 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 7:48 PM

Well let's hope that's all it was, then.

Good to hear! Yes

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Snibs on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 8:11 PM

Is that a varnish? humidity can cause that.

My airbrush and modeling page.

Two cheap spray booths compared, the BD-512 and HS-E420DC

On The Bench.

German V2.

F/A-18A. 

P51D

 

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: Michigan
Posted by Straycat1911 on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 9:27 PM

Snibs

Is that a varnish? humidity can cause that.

 

No, it’s MM lacquer flat coat, and it’s cold and dry up here in the North country right now.

Hmmm, lacquer over enamels. That might be part of the problem but this is the first time it’s ever happened.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 9:47 PM

Depends on where you sprayed. Outdoors or unheated garage perhaps? I never spray in cold environments.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 9:49 PM

Snibs

Is that a varnish? humidity can cause that.

 

No such thing as humidity in winter - especially in the Great White North country...

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Snibs on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 10:02 PM

Guess it's not humidity then,

I use varnish and lacquer over enamel all the time without problems.....unless it's humid of course and we get heaps of it here in Oz Big Smile.

Mick.

My airbrush and modeling page.

Two cheap spray booths compared, the BD-512 and HS-E420DC

On The Bench.

German V2.

F/A-18A. 

P51D

 

  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Thursday, January 03, 2019 9:25 AM

I'm not one to bet on the results of lacquer on top of enamel because I've seen it work and I've seen it go gittiwonkers too. Usually it's not hazing though but rather crazing  or wrinkling and it may not be right away either, though it could be.. Wrinkling could be pretty immediate, crazing could be in a year or two or more. Not saying it will, just saying I've seen it and more than once.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 03, 2019 12:10 PM

There's a whole host of things it could be. Since you got better results after shaking it probably wasn't mixed well. 

But yes what the guys listed can all be involved here: 

Humidity

An old can that's gone bad

Too heavy a coat over acrylic 

Not mixed well as you said

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, January 03, 2019 12:18 PM

How long did the enamel cure before appling the Testors dull coat? 

 Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 3:13 PM

Proper mixing is VERY important, not just a quick shake or a stir but thorough mixing at least a minute or two.

I spray flat clear lacquer over enamels and acrylics all the time with  no issues . The first couple of coats need to be light so they dry fast reducing any type of reaction on the acrylic or enamel. I let the acrylic and enamel cure for at least a couple of days before spraying over the lacquer dull coat.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Boston
Posted by Wilbur Wright on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 2:12 PM

You may have applied the MM flat laquer too heavy.  It comes out much faster than paint in a rattle can.  Light mist coats are recommended.  

There is no problem whatsoever applying this over enamels.  I have done that with over 200 models.  MM enamel airbrushed then  MM flat from the rattle can. 

*You must let the enamel  (or any paint for that matter) dry for at least 48 hours if not for several days. Then flat in mist coats then a slightly wet coat.

Always let your paint cure.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, January 10, 2019 9:33 AM

I have had Testors clearcoats blush.  That is the white appearance due to high humidity.  Lacquer thinners evaporate so fast they actually cool surface. If the dewpoint is too high- close to ambient temperature, it condenses on the paint and appears as a white fog.  Usually this is summer time really damp weather.  Indoor humidity in winter is usually ver low. It is the humidity where you are painting that counts.  But in summer on warm days, try to watch out for really muggy or wet days and avoid lacquer glosscoats.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: Michigan
Posted by Straycat1911 on Friday, January 11, 2019 10:04 AM

Thanks for all the answers, guys. 

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